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    Cultural Atlas of Ancient Egypt (Cultural Atlas of)
    by John Baines, Jaromir Malek
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (01 October, 2000)
    list price: $50.00 -- our price: $31.50
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Reviews (3)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Excellent maps and illustrations
    As Baines and Malek explained in their introduction, they attempted to make this atlas useful for those readers who might plan to travel to Egypt and visit the ancient sites.The authors made good on this claim by devoting over half of the atlas to a section entitled "A Journey Down the Nile", which provides a survey of ancient sites that are encountered while traveling down the Nile from Elephantine towards the Delta.Archaeological finds are briefly introduced for each location through a combination of discussion, illustrations, and frequent maps.Since this part of the atlas is organized according to geography (south to north along the Nile), sites from different historical periods are inevitably mixed together, which leads to a confusing sequence of, for example, Ptolemaic temples followed by New Kingdom tombs followed by Predynastic graves and so on.While this arrangement might be useful as a travel guide of sorts, armchair travelers (like myself) who expect a continuous development of ideas may be disappointed.Perhaps if the authors had organized their "Journey" chronologically as well as geographically, this atlas would have had more of an impact on its readership, especially when reinforced by the plethora of photos, illustrations, and maps that are present.

    Despite this misgiving, I thought that the short articles that constitute the remainder of the atlas were informative and interesting.Topics covered in these articles include Egyptian art, religion, and writing, among others.And of course, numerous photos and diagrams are provided that are a pleasure in and of themselves.

    As far as I'm concerned, the major strengths of the "Cultural Atlas of Ancient Egypt" are the excellent historical maps, the floor diagrams of the major sites, and the visual delight provided by the beautiful photos.Although the geographical framework is a limitation, the strengths outweigh the weaknesses, and this book will probably be able to satisfy the "Egyptomania" fix of many readers.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A superb guide.
    I have loved traveling to Egypt for years and have devoured everything decent I can find to read about this country and its people. If you want to understand the Egyptians this volume is one good place to start.

    5-0 out of 5 stars An intellectual and visual delight
    This is the second edition of one of the finest summations of ancient Egyptian civilization ever written for the general reader. Not only is this an exellent introduction to many aspects of Egypt, it is a visual delight. The maps, especially, configure in the reader's mind spacial relationships and their cultural implications. Other illustrations of temple precincts and related architectural elements of Egyptian life supplement the excellent writing, written for, but never "down to" non-specialists. If I were to own only one reference work on ancient Egypt, this would be the one. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0816040362
    Sales Rank: 147840
    Subjects:  1. 332 B.C-638 A.D    2. Ancient - Egypt    3. Ancient Egypt - History    4. Antiquities    5. Atlases - Historical    6. Civilization    7. Egypt    8. History    9. History - General History    10. History: World    11. Reference    12. To 332 B.C   


    $31.50

    Egyptian Religion
    by Siegfried Morenz, Ann E. Keep
    Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 April, 1992)
    list price: $23.95 -- our price: $23.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Reviews (3)

    4-0 out of 5 stars A SCHOLARLY TEXT WHICH DESERVED A BETTER TRANSLATION
    This book on ancient Egyptian religion is certainlynot for the newcomers. It is dense, full of textual references and words in Hebrew and Greek - which are not translated at all - and Egyptian texts in specialized transliteration, all of which will become a hard burden for the unnoticed reader. A comparison between the original German edition and this English version is annoying: the latter being many times quite free regarding the former, as to even change the spirit of some passages. For the learned in the field, it is, even with all these hamperings, a good-researched and scholarly text which provides many thought-provoking questions never proffered before in a (supposedly) "general interpretation" of the religious creeds of ancient Egypt. An indispensable tool for the researchers in this field, not doubt at all.

    5-0 out of 5 stars excellent reference on Egyptian religion
    For the ancient Egyptian their civilisation and their religion were one and the same. To this end they developed over time a complex cosmological structure of the interactions of man and the gods, with the emphasis beingon creation and the afterlife. An additional feature which sets this bookapart from the numerous others in its field are the comparative andinteractive analyses with the religions of Ethiopia, Greece and Syria.Available both in its English translation and the German original, it is asuperb reference which ably demonstrates that religion was the fundamentalbasis of the Ancient Egyptian civilisation. It is highly recommended forall academics, scholars and laypeople.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Annoying!
    This is not your typical book on Egyptian religion. The author takes concepts of Egyptian religion (such as what came first, Egyptian ritual or myth) and tries to prove the author's point (at times very poorly). Othertopics include:How man related to God? Consciousness of sin (yes sin)?How the Egyptians viewed fate?Etc., etc.

    There are two reasons why Idid not like this book. The first one is due to the author's constantreference to Judaism and Christianity. I would have preferred moreinformation on Egyptian religion than Judaism or Christianity. The secondreason why I did not like this book, is constant display of Greek andHebrew?phrases. The author (or translator) does not explain what thesephrases mean or if they are from the original text he is reading from. These phrases are so consistent they become annoying. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0801480299
    Sales Rank: 569825
    Subjects:  1. Ancient - Egypt    2. Ancient Egyptian Religion    3. Egypt    4. Religion    5. Religion - World Religions   


    $23.95

    The Egyptian Book of the Dead: The Book of Going Forth by Day
    by Raymond Faulkner, Ogden Goelet, Carol Andrews
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 August, 2000)
    list price: $29.95 -- our price: $19.77
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Reviews (11)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Plates, Hieroglyphs and more!!!
    The only great thing about this edition is the addition of the plates and hieroglyphs to the Papyrus of Anu-Ia (so-called Ani because of laziness); it would have scored 20-stars if the "balance" of the chapters (located at the back of this edition) came with plates and hieroglyphs as well!!!

    Still, translations are just that---Translations! I rated this book with 5-stars only because of the plates and hieroglyphs, however, the translation, which invites many people to revoke their own minds in exchange for someone else's (the translator's), I can do without.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Ian Myles Slater on How to Succeed in the Next World
    It would hardly seem necessary to add another review, but it seems it would be helpful to make a few things clear. "The Book of the Dead" is not, as some reviewers seem to think, a (not very good) encyclopedia of Egyptian life. Nor is it a compendium of mythology (the narrative content is remarkably small). Nor is it (an early but durable misconception) "the Egyptian Bible". The name applies to a number of collections of spells, prayers, hymns, and instructions (the contents varying from copy to copy, and over time), which were included in tombs. They were intended to assist the deceased in achieving a happy existence (and avoiding destruction) in the afterlife. The contents are, in this context, quite utilitarian. To the Egyptians it was "Coming Forth by Day" (as a glorified spirit), and those who could afford it commissioned beautifully executed copies as essential equipment for their long-term future. Many copies, including the Papyrus of Ani, included numerous illustrations (some exquisite) of major and minor gods, the intended owner and his family, and scenes of the (very earthly) Next World. The collection emerged from earlier bodies of tomb and coffin literature during the New Kingdom, and versions continued to be produced into Roman times.

    This particular edition reproduces (beautifully) the color edition of the New Kingdom "Papyrus of Ani" published by the British Museum in the nineteenth century. That version was edited by E.A.W. Budge -- who had purchased the scroll in Egypt -- in collaboration with another Victorian-era Egyptologist, Le Page Renouf. This modern presentation is actually an improvement, since computer manipulation has allowed the rejoining of material which Budge arbitrarily separated when preparing the brittle papyrus for shipment by pasting sections on wooden blocks. (The papyrus has, inevitably, deteriorated since it was unrolled. The few modern reproductions of images from it which I have seen were a letdown after the early descriptions. James Wasserman's Preface, which mentions this problem, refers to photographs in an Egyptological series, which I have not seen.)

    That first edition was always rare and expensive, and hardly ever available today, and then at a very high price indeed. It was followed by a popular edition, prepared by Budge, containing the text in a hieroglyphic transcription, interlinear transliterations and translations, a more polished translation, and an elaborate introduction and other apparatus, including supplementary material from roughly contemporary texts, and some black and white versions of the illustrations. This latter edition has been reissued for decades by Dover Publications, and at first glance it looks like a wonderful bargain. The arrangement looks promising, and the hieroglyphic font was a brilliant example of nineteenth-century design.

    Unhappily, Budge was not only writing in the nineteenth century, he was already behind the times even then. His transliteration is utterly obsolete, and his smooth translation misleading (although the interlinear translation is sometimes helpful figuring out the original word order when comparing translations by others). His introduction and commentary are full of errors (or then-current misconceptions), and he devotes a lot of space to almost-forgotten controversies (useful to the serious student, a waste of time to most readers). I enjoy looking at it, but have never trusted it.

    Budge went on to edit a "complete" Book of the Dead, the hieroglyphic text of which is still cited, and a translation of that text, still (or recently) in print (under the Arkana and other imprints) and also misleading.

    For anyone who has longed for the color plates of Budge's original edition, and dreamed of a modern translation of what it says, this edition will meet most demands. It does not (alas!) have a modern transliteration, but that is its only real lack. It contains a limited, but useful, commentary. There are translations, based on critically edited versions of those "Chapters" found in the Papyrus of Ani, on the same pages as the facsimiles. Like Budge's popular edition, it also contains translations of important material from other copies of the collection from the same period.The translations are based on those by the late Raymond Faulkner, which also appear, with other material, in another "Book of the Dead" translation.

    So, if you are looking for an outstanding example of Egyptian funerary literature and art from the New Kingdom, you will probably want this book. If you are looking for a general introduction to ancient Egypt, a reference work, or comprehensive anthology of ancient Egyptian literature, try something else. (You will probably want to return to this if what you find there interests you, but that is another matter.)

    3-0 out of 5 stars Review
    I gave it a three because I thought it contained other information, but however it is a good guide to the ancient rituals of Egypt. It's contents just tell about what they said and all during the process of the ceremonies. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0811807673
    Sales Rank: 22953
    Subjects:  1. Ancient - Egypt    2. Antiquities & Archaeology    3. Future life    4. History    5. History: World    6. Incantations, Egyptian    7. Reincarnation    8. Religion - World Religions   


    $19.77

    Concise Dictionary of Middle Egyptian
    by Raymond Faulkner
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (January, 1962)
    list price: $45.00 -- our price: $45.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Reviews (8)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Le bras droit de l'étudiant égyptologue
    Ce dictionnaire est d'un grand secours pour moi. J'étudie les hiéroglyphes depuis 2 ans et mon ancien dictionnaire n'est rien en comparaison avec celui-ci. le Faulkner donne les références aux textes, ce qui aide la traduction. En plus, tout est écrit à la main, ce qui donne un certain cachet au livre!

    Vraiment un bon achat!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Best Middle Egyptian dictionary in English around!
    This dictionary offers almost the entire corpus of vocabulary of Middle Egyptian literary texts that a student will encounter. No, it is *not* a complete corpus of ALL Middle Egyptian words, but it does cover the standard texts that are used in learning the language (Story of Sinuhe, the Shipwrecked Sailor, etc.). Even advanced students and professionals use this one volume work when the standard multi-volume dictionary (written in German) is a bit much.

    Some reviewers here have complained bitterly that the book is autographed (i.e., written by hand, not typeset). This book appeared first long before computers and computer typesetting. At that time (and often even today) it was standard for books with huge sections of Egyptian hieroglyphs to be written by hand, including the five volume German dictionary mentioned above. Yes, hot metal type was available, but with a press set-up fee of several thousand British pounds, it was rarely used. Moreover, not every hieroglyph is available in type (even in computer fonts). Fortunately Faulkner and his assistants have a very clear and legible hand and offer no problem in this regard.

    The only minor draw back is that the book is somewhat dated by today's standards (originally published in 1962), but not overly so. A few words have different transliterations today, and of course new meanings and newly discovered words are not given. However, unless you can read German, this book is well worth its price and will certainly handle the sorts of texts serious students will be presented with. It is by far better than Budge's horrendously out of date -- and down right inaccurate -- dictionary.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Is this a joke?
    Can anyone please tell me why this book appears to have been HANDWRITTEN? Maybe someone thought it would just look cool to publish an entire book by photocopying Faulkner's notes. The book is somewhat useful and is good for translating certain stubborn Egyptian texts, but frankly I expected much more. The book seems literally thrown together. Add to this the fact that there is NO English to Egyptian cross-reference. You have to buy the supplemental reference at additional cost (review on that coming soon).

    An Egyptian hieroglyphic dictionary is the single most important tool a student can possess. Either the publishers have some specific copyright that prevents someone else from writing a similar dictionary, or there is simply no market for one because professors receive a kickback for requiring Faulkner's book. I recommend this book for one reason: It is the only one that exists. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0900416327
    Sales Rank: 95435
    Subjects:  1. Foreign Language - Dictionaries / Phrase Books    2. Miscellaneous    3. Reference   


    $45.00

    The Complete Pyramids: Solving the Ancient Mysteries
    by Mark Lehner
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (24 November, 1997)
    list price: $39.95 -- our price: $25.17
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Reviews (13)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Good nuts and bolts but missed the mark for me.
    Lehner does what he does so well.Except for changing his tune a little from his last work, the actual building process was overdone, I think.Whether he made some miscalculations here and there is not so important to the genre.There is some evidence that the ancients knew how to forge copper into a much harder tool than we would expect today.There is better modern evidence of the overall engineering available to the reader elsewhere.

    What I wanted to see was more behind the title.I wanted to see why the design was chosen and so painstakingly duplicated not only in Egypt, but also in China and South America.Also, other than elaborate busy-work, why were they commissioned in the first place?And who were the designers?

    Ah, for that answer I refer you to The Ark of Millions of Years, by Clark & Agnew.The common origin of the design and the civilization it took to muster the resources are beautifully documented in great literary style.The recognition by the ancients of the significance and true use of the design is supported from so many sources it is impossible to misunderstand.

    Without taking sides or preaching some philosophy, The Ark of Millions of Years may be the best book ever written on the subject of earth science and creation.I liked it so well I bought two more copies for my friends.

    5-0 out of 5 stars This text sets a new standard for archaeological literature.
    Like its author, this book is completely devoted to the Pyramids of Egypt. The major premise - that the archaeological record bears witness to an evolution of pyramid design, construction and function from beginning to end of the Pyramid Age - is demonstrated brilliantly and completely. It explains without exhausting the religious significance of the conceptual Pyramid Complex, then concentrates on the `brick and mortar' aspects of its subject. An informative review of explorations at the pyramid sites throughout the ages is equally as interesting as the detailed descriptions of the pyramids themselves that follows in a section fittingly titled "The Whole Pyramid Catalogue". This catalogue, comprising fully half the volume, is a description of each individual Egyptian Pyramid Complex presented (chronologically) with such clarity of detail that it dispels all ambiguity created by several lifetimes of sensationalist and speculative journalism surrounding its subject. In its latter pages the author discusses the role of the Pyramid Complex as administrative center and landlord in later antiquity, and gracefully addresses the more controversial of topics, including the ubiquitous "how did they do it" question, along with his own speculations on some unanswered sociological questions - the size of the work force and logistics.Quite reasoned and well-informed estimates lead him to conclusions that will in their own right prove controversial.One notable unintended consequence of this volume is that many artifacts, presented elsewhere as "Art", assume their appropriate contextual venue and so now hold much more meaning for this reader. The Narmer Palate as declarative stellae in a walled courtyard at Nekhen is one example, the gilded yet austere canopied boudoir of Hetepheres is another.The text is very well written and easily read. Heavily illustrated, the photographs are appropriate, of excellent quality and are well placed; line drawings are used throughout to clarify and supplement photographs. With this volume Dr. Mark Lehner joins the ranks of Egypt's most celebrated archaeologists, and surpasses them all in understanding and presentation of the facts concerning the Pyramids.

    1-0 out of 5 stars The Incomplete Pyramids: Distorting the Ancient Mysteries
    The author who asked readers to believe people were grotesque hybrid
    beings with horse heads and human bodies when the Great Pyramid was
    built, and that native Egyptians had tails and feathered legs (Mark
    Lehner, The Egyptian Heritage: Based on the Edgar Cayce Readings,
    1974) is proposing nonsensical information about pyramid
    construction. The Complete Pyramids does not ask readers to believe
    the Great Pyramid was built by Atlanteans in 12,000 B.C., or that when
    people were cleansed in the temples their claws changed into hands and
    their tails fell away, as he did in The Egyptian Heritage. But he does
    expect readers to believe information that defies scientific
    methodology and the archaeological record. For brevity, I offer only
    four points with hope of helping to correct the record.

    First,
    consider how Mark Lehner defies scientific method. He recognizes that
    Giza is not known to exhibit the housing needed for the 100,000 or
    more builders engineers assert were needed to build the Great Pyramid
    within Khufu's reign. Lehner proposes only 25,000 men, indicating,
    however, that most were miscellaneous workers.

    To get his reduced
    number, Lehner wrongly calculates with an averaged block weight of 2.5
    tons, rather than taking into account a myriad of far larger building
    units of over 15 tons.Although more study of the block weights is
    warranted, Lehner fails to acknowledge that the heights of the blocks
    are sufficiently documented to make better calculations than he would
    have readers believe. Indeed, the heights of each course were first
    measured in the 1800s and as recently as the 1970s. The published
    reports of these studies match (except for the loss of some upper
    tiers since the 1800s) because of accurate measurements.The charts
    show that many of the heaviest blocks in the outer masonry are at the
    level of the King's Chamber. Some of these blocks occupy the height of
    two tiers. By calculating with an averaged weight of 2.5 tons, Lehner
    rids the workforce of many thousands.

    Furthermore, Lehner
    incorrectly uses a calculation for moving blocks along level ground,
    rather than one for raising blocks on a ramp! He thereby reduces the
    workforce by many thousands.

    Second, Lehner assumes that nummulitic
    limestone blocks can be leveled and otherwise shaped with copper
    tools. Thus, he ignores up-to-date Egyptology. For instance, Dieter
    Arnold's Building in Egypt (1993) recognizes that the mines could not
    furnish enough copper for cutting millions of pyramid blocks, and
    Arnold shows that copper tools are unworkable on medium-hard to hard
    limestone (the Great Pyramid's blocks are mostly medium-hard to
    hard). In short, the strongest metal of the Pyramid Age was too soft
    to cut the blocks so as to render the Great Pyramid's extraordinary
    features.

    Third, Lehner's estimate of the time required to quarry
    blocks is useless, and his discussion of how blocks could have been
    quarried is misleading. Lehner writes: "To build the Great
    Pyramid in 23 years...322 cu. m (11,371 cu. ft) of stone had to be
    quarried daily. How many quarrymen would this require? Our NOVA
    pyramid-building experiment provided a useful comparison:...8.5
    stones per day. But though they worked barefoot and without power
    tools, they had the advantage of a winch with an iron cable to pull
    the stones away from the quarry face. An additional 20-man team might
    have been needed for the task in Khufu's day." The NOVA crew,
    however, used modern steel tools! Lehner's calculation is invalid
    because he utilizes the tremendous advantage afforded by steel tools
    (it is incorrect for Lehner to call NOVA's tools 'iron,' although
    steel is mostly iron. His use of the word iron makes NOVA's tools seem
    like those of the ancient world. They are not. Furthermore, the
    Egyptians did not possess iron until 800 years after the Great
    Pyamid's construction, and iron does not have the capabilities of
    steel). NOVA's quarrymen can be seen using steel adzes and steel pry
    bars. They used heavy steel pickaxes to cut trenches to isolate
    blocks. They drove steel wedges beneath blocks and hit these wedges
    with steel sledgehammers. Compare Pyramid Age tools of copper, wood
    and stone. If Lehner presented such methodology in the 'hard'
    sciences, he would be subjected to the kind of criticism that end
    careers.

    Lehner adds that his "figure can be expanded further
    to compensate for other advantages of iron tools." With this he
    admits, in a manner too subdued to alert the average reader of his
    tactics, that his estimate does not involve Pyramid Age tools. Pyramid
    Age tools are inadequate for quarrying or shaping good-quality
    limestone blocks. No matter how many workers are employed, if the
    tools are inadequate the work cannot be completed. The very existence
    of the Great Pyramid suggests that a different method was
    used.

    Fourth, Lehner's calculation of the number of men needed to
    haul blocks from the quarry to the Great Pyramid is flawed and
    misleading. He writes, "Let us assume that the stone haulers
    could move 1 km (0.62 miles) per hour en route from the quarry to the
    pyramid...The distance from Khufu's quarry to the pyramid, at c. 6o
    slope, could probably be covered in 19 minutes by 20 men pulling a 2.5
    ton block. Certainly, this was well within the capacities of the NOVA
    team..." Again, Lehner uses averaged weights of 2.5 tons,
    ignoring the need to address hundreds of thousands of 15-ton and
    larger units. He insinuates that NOVA's experiment validates his
    calculations!A front-end loader, however, hauled all blocks from the
    quarry. Even the three or four one-ton stones raised manually for
    NOVA's on-camera demonstration were hauled and placed onto the
    mini-ramp by this machine.

    Lehner mentions the front-end loader,
    implying it only set stones in the lower courses of NOVA's
    mini-pyramid. ....









    ... Read more

    Isbn: 0500050848
    Sales Rank: 222946
    Subjects:  1. Ancient - Egypt    2. Ancient Egypt Archaeology    3. Antiquities    4. Archaeology    5. Archaeology / Anthropology    6. Construction - General    7. Egypt    8. History: World    9. Pyramids    10. Social Science   


    $25.17

    Ancient Egyptian Coffin Texts: Spells, 1-354 (Modern Egyptology Series)
    by R.O. Faulkner, Raymond Oliver Faulkner
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 June, 1978)
    list price: $42.00 -- our price: $42.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Reviews (3)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Hi,Can anyone please tell me more about this books as far as
    Hi, as far as what's I heard from the others EGYPT BOOKS,
    they said this book was a very powerful books,but I wonder
    what's inside the books? Are the spells"Easy"to follow?
    and what's kinda of spells are inside this "Coffin Text Spells"book? and did they have any chanting or is it easy
    to perform the spells? most of all,does they have any forms
    of LOVE SPELLS and Prosperity spells inside this book?
    Are these spells very powerful? if you owned this book,could you please let me know all information about this book,
    thanks alot

    5-0 out of 5 stars A GREAT TRANSLATION OF A GREAT FUNERARY CORPUS
    There are not words to praise late Dr. Faulkner for the impressive task he had undetook at translating the 7 volumes of the"editio princeps" of the valuable Ancient Egyptian Coffin Texts, like he had already done with the Pyramid Texts in 1969. Anybody interested in ancient Egyptian religion and funerary literature must own a copy of this edition, whether under this "omnibus edition, 3 vols. in 1", or the extended edition in 3 vols. MOreover, a new reprint of the same is badly in need for it is very difficulto to find it at hand. So that you known: if you have the chance, and you are looking for an authoritative, researched and scholarly translation: THIS IS THE TITLE YOU MUST OWN1

    5-0 out of 5 stars Too good to be
    Ancient Egypt has always been a facination to everyone. This book of spells will have you reading all the way. Join Raymond Oliver Faulkner ashe reveals a whole new world to you... ... Read more

    Isbn: 0856680052
    Sales Rank: 1273212
    Subjects:  1. Comparative Religion    2. Egypt    3. Religion    4. Religion - World Religions    5. Sources   


    $42.00

    The Literature of Ancient Egypt : An Anthology of Stories, Instructions, and Poetry, New Edition
    by William Kelly Simpson, Raymond O. Faulkner
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (10 September, 1973)
    list price: $19.95
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    Reviews (3)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great Reference
    This is a great book to add to your Egyptian Literature library. It contains many narratives, stories, lamentations, and poetry which can also be found in the three volume set by Miriam Lichtheim. Although many`stories' are fragmentary - it is not THAT excessive. The editors haveprovided footnotes and commentaries on the missing parts of the stories,which attempt to explain the missing parts. Each `story' starts with acommentary, and is followed by the text. Some pieces include: "ShipwreckedSailor", "Story of Sinuhe", "Tale of the Doomed Prince", "Contendings ofHorus and Seth", "Truth and Falsehood", "Teaching for Merikare", "Maxims ofPtahhotpe", "The Man Who Was Tired of Life", "Instruction of Amenemope","Hymn to the Aten", "Instruction of a Man for His Son".

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great Reference
    This is a great book to add to your Egyptian Literature library. It contains many narratives, stories, lamentations, and poetry which can also be found in the three volume set by Miriam Lichtheim. Although many`stories' are fragmentary - it is not THAT excessive. The editors haveprovided footnotes and commentaries on the missing parts of the stories,which attempt to explain the missing parts. Each `story' starts with acommentary, and is followed by the text. Some pieces include: "ShipwreckedSailor", "Story of Sinuhe", "Tale of the Doomed Prince", "Contendings ofHorus and Seth", "Truth and Falsehood", "Teaching for Merikare", "Maxims ofPtahhotpe", "The Man Who Was Tired of Life", "Instruction of Amenemope","Hymn to the Aten", "Instruction of a Man for His Son".

    3-0 out of 5 stars Collection from Old, Middle and New Kingdoms.
    I should say that the edition that I bought only last year, the new edition, is from 1973 and may not be exactly like the revised edition.My interest in these writings arose from an understanding that they had a notintangible effect on Biblical literature.But although I feel bad givingthis book only 3 stars I should explain that there are reasons for this. First is that many of the stories, etc. are fragmentary or missing theentire beginning, end or both.If they were all complete it would get atleast 4.The other reason is the often obscure quality of the readings,which is purely a function of our not getting enough exposure to books likethis.Mostly if the story was complete, it was very enjoyable, but ifbroken up and missing parts, it seemed useless to the general reader.So Icannot say that the low rating is due in any way to the fault of theeditors or translators.Other than that it was a charming array of talesand advice that is every bit as good as Biblical literature. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0300017111
    Sales Rank: 511900
    Subjects:  1. Ancient - Egypt    2. Egypt    3. Egyptian literature    4. General    5. Literary Criticism    6. Literary collections    7. Sociology    8. Translations into English    9. Social Science / General   


    The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt (Oxford Illustrated Histories)
    by Ian Shaw
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (01 November, 2000)
    list price: $49.95 -- our price: $39.65
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    Editorial Review

    One of the most vexing problems in Egyptology is the question of establishing reliable chronologies, whether through relative methods such as stratigraphy and the dating of artifacts or through more absolute time horizons established by astronomical ephemera or radiometric dating. In this overview of ancient Egypt--meant for advanced students, but accessible to general readers with an interest in the area--Ian Shaw and 13 contributors pay close attention to issues of chronology, reconciling conflicts of dating that mark older scholarship.

    While doing so, they address other problems in the study of ancient Egypt, such as the lack of material evidence of early humans in the region and the increasing destruction of sites in the face of contemporary urban growth. Elsewhere, they remark on the principal developments that distinguish periods in Egyptian prehistory, such as the Old Kingdom's use of large-scale building projects to consolidate power and "remind people of the greatness of pharaonic civilization," and the Middle and New kingdoms' apparent openness to foreigners, which lent Egypt a cosmopolitan, multicultural air that persisted for centuries during long periods of domination by outside powers such as Persia and Rome. Highly useful as a reference and survey, this handsomely illustrated book is a fine addition to any Egyptophile's collection. --Gregory McNamee ... Read more

    Reviews (7)

    4-0 out of 5 stars A very thorough account
    Starting, as I did, with the most superficial knowledge of Ancient Egypt, this book was an incredibly useful review.As mentioned earlier, the style may be a bit dry for the casual reader.There are two areas in which I would have liked to see more details:

    Throughout the book, there are only passing mentions of what is going on elsewhere in the world at the same time.I usually find these "synchronizations" very useful in a history book.

    The final two chapters (about the Ptolemaic period and the Roman period) are not nearly as well written or as thorough as the rest.It is as if they were written as an addendum.Hopefully, a later edition might address these issues.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Thorough, Scholarly but hard work
    The work in this book is presented in a thorough and detailed manner, covering the whole fascinating history of ancient Egyptian civilization. My one complaint is that the style is very dry, making it tough going for a non-specialist (even one used to academic treatise in another field). That said, if you are willing to stick with it, or wish to have a reliable reference work on the subject, this would be an asset on your bookshelf.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent update on Ancient Egypt
    This is a first rate book on the General History of Ancient Egypt from Pre-Historic times until the end of the Roman Empire. The 13 various contributors--Betsy Bryan, Gae Callendar, Janine Bourriau, Jaromir Malik and Ian Shaw among others--give an excellent overview of Egypt's long and distinguished History. The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt is a good update on Alan Gardiner's 1963 Egypt of the Pharaohs and Nicolas Grimal's more recent 1988 book, A History of Ancient Egypt. While one might diagree with a contributors take on certain topics such as Ms. Callenders complete rejection of the institution of any coregencies in the Middle Kingdom which are accepted by most scholars(they are certainly documented between Senusert I/Amenemhet II, Amenemhet II/Senusert II and Amenemhet III & IV based on the Inscription at Konosso in Nubia for the latter; rather, it is the coregency of Amenemhet I/Senusert I which is currently contested), they are more than made up for by these scholars careful and balanced coverage and interpretation of all the latest archaeological evidence. These contributors certainly know their areas of expertise well.

    Especially impressive were the various contributors inclusion and analysis of much of the latest studies on Egypt's various Periods of History such as Kim Ryholt's 1997 book on the Second Intermediate Period and Luc Gabolde's important 1987 SAK paper on the length of the reigns of Tuthmose I and II, based on their attested scarabs. One of the most invaluable parts of the book is its exhaustive catalogue of all the best books, publications and journal articles on Egypt's various historical eras.

    My only regret was that John Taylor's coverage of the end of Third Intermediate Period is rather short and fails to examine the Libyan Period in any great detail after Sheshonq I's reign. He briefly mentions this period's history of severe political fragmentation with 3 kings alone ruling simultaneously in the Delta Region(Tefnakht of Sais, Osorkon IV at Tanis and Iuput II of Leontopolis) which is documented in Piye's Year 20 Victory stela--and does not mention the recent(1993) discovery of a completely new Tanite king namely Sheshonq IV, who reigned between Sheshonq III and Pami. Finally, no reference was made to the discovery of an Annal document for Pami in Heliopolis which shows that this king's Highest Year date was his 7th Year. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0198150342
    Subjects:  1. Africa - General    2. Ancient - Egypt    3. Ancient Egypt - History    4. Egypt    5. History    6. History - General History    7. History: World    8. Middle East - Egypt    9. To 640 A.D    10. African history: BCE to c 500 CE    11. Ancient Egypt    12. Ancient World    13. BCE to c 500 CE    14. Prehistory   


    $39.65

    The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt
    by Donald B. Redford
    Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (15 December, 2000)
    list price: $450.00 -- our price: $450.00
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    Reviews (8)

    3-0 out of 5 stars Definitive but poorly presented
    This is an A-Z of Egyptology which will act as a definitive reference. Two downsides:
    1) There is no narrative introduction to the subject, so this Encyclopedia would complement a 'history', but not replace it
    2) The photographs are in black and white and are often bad quality: badly focussed, badly lit.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Not worth [money] much less 10 times that amount
    The problem with this encyclopedia is that it is not encyclopedic in nature.Many topics are not covered (for example, you won't find Hatshepsut's mortuary temple in it), and those that are covered are handled in a very simplistic and abbreviated (not concise, just short) way.

    I cannot remember when I was so disappointed in a reference book...maybe never.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Wrong Book
    There is a problem here - there is an updated version of this book, available elsewhere, which (i) is longer, (ii)has more color photos, and (iii) is about 10% cheaper. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0195102347
    Sales Rank: 932698
    Subjects:  1. 332 B.C.-638 A.D    2. 332 B.C.-638 A.D.    3. Ancient - Egypt    4. Ancient Egypt - History    5. Antiquities    6. Archaeology    7. Civilization    8. Egypt    9. Encyclopedias    10. History - General History    11. Reference    12. Reference And Information Services    13. To 332 B.C    14. To 332 B.C.    15. African history: BCE to c 500 CE    16. Ancient Egypt    17. Ancient World    18. Reference works   


    $450.00

    Akhenaten: The Heretic King
    by Donald B. Redford
    Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 October, 1987)
    list price: $35.00 -- our price: $35.00
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    Reviews (7)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Akhenaten Worshipper of the Sun.Indeed, no.
    Amenhotep, later Pharaoh Akhenaten, has been called a "worshipper of the sun" by a recent reviewer.Surely he was not. National Geographic (April 2001) quotes him as saying: "Oh living Aten, who initiates life.... Oh, sole god, without another beside him! You create the Earth according to your wish.... You are in my heart, and there is none who knows you except your son." It is said that he spoke these words as the Sun rose.

    But is he a worshipper of the outer, physical Sun or the inner, spiritual Sun, that is ultimately God? Who has initiated life?God the Father has.Does not the Upanishads, which predates Akhenaten, say that "the whole universe came forth from [God] and moves in [God]"? (Prabhavavanda and Manchester, Upanishads, 23. The Sanskrit word used is "Brahman.")

    Who is the sole god, without another beside him?The Heavenly Father is One without a second, is He not?Is there any difference between what Akhenaten said and what Isaiah said?" I am God, and there is none else."(Isaiah 5:22.)Or Shankara: "[God] alone is real. There is none but He." (Prabhavananda and Isherwood, Crest-Jewel of Discrimination, 69.)Surely what Akhenaten is saying is that only God exists; there are not two in the universe, but only One."Hear, Oh Israel, the Lord thy God.The Lord is One."

    Did He not create the Earth (and the heavens) according to His wish? Said Solomon: "The Lord ... hath founded the earth."(Proverbs 3:19.) Said Shankara: "[God] is the cause of the evolution of the universe, its preservation and its dissolution." (CJD, 75-6.)

    Does He not reside in the heart of each being as the Immortal Self?Krishna declares: "The Lord lives in the heart of every creature." (Prabhavavanda and Isherwood, Bhagavad-Gita, 129.) Or the Upanishads: "The Supreme Person, ... the Innermost Self, dwells forever in the heart of all beings."(Upanishads, 24.)

    And where is the difference between saying that "there is none who knows you except your son" and saying, with Jesus, "no man knoweth who the Son is, but the Father; and who the Father is, but the Son."(Luke 9:22.) This same Son, this Christ, this Pearl of great price and treasure buried in a field -- is not this the immortal Self, the Son of God?

    When Akhenaten says, "I shall make [the royal city of] Akhetaten for the Aten, my father, in this place,"is he referring to his earthly father or to his Heavenly Father, whom he revered?

    I submit that Pharoah Akhenaten was an enlightened man, who had knowledge of the Heavenly Father through mystical insight, as all the world's saints and sages have had.He had this experience, as they all did, when the Inner Sun of the Self arose, not on the earthly horizon, but on the inner horizon of the heart.The religion that he initiated, which was overthrown after his death, was the worship of the same Heavenly Father that all mystics and masters through eternity have reverenced.

    Seeing him in this way eliminates the difficulties inherent in casting him as a mere worshipper of the Sun and restores to him his true accomplishment: he fulfilled the purpose of life -- to realize God.That his contemporaries did not give him his due is unfortunate.But, with the benefit of thousands of years of spiritual learning, we have the opportunity to set that unfortunate circumstance straight and give Akhenaten his true place in history, along with such other enlightened mystics as Solomon, Socrates, Jesus, and Buddha.

    1-0 out of 5 stars PURE VENOM!!
    I am sorry but as a decent and self respecting human being, (and to put it nicely, too), I am permenantly allergic to this book. Akhenaten is my absolute hero and I don't know where these peoplewho detract from him including in this work think they'll get off taking untruthful and cheap shots at him. Obviously, they are afraid to look further into the sheer beauty and kindness which radiates from both him and his brilliant poetry. I think that if they decided to open their minds and look further, they would suddenly see the startling lovliness of this man. But this book is just cruel far beyond the edge of decency, though this author obviously isn't stupid, as he projects onto so many other fine people. I give it one star only because there isn't a zero, so this is the lowest.

    4-0 out of 5 stars informative book about Akhenaten
    The author portrays Akhenaten more as an atheist than a monotheist. A striking portrait is an outline of this fascinating 'worshiper of the sun', who is also one of the best known pharaohs. A good overview is provided ofthe Akhenaten Temple Project. Some of the author's comments are amusingwhich makes the book more enjoyable especially through the 'dry' moments.The book contains a short glossary, suggested readings, and many black andwhite illustrations and drawings. It is recommended for the open-minded layperson. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0691002177
    Sales Rank: 171799
    Subjects:  1. Akhenaton,    2. Ancient Egypt Archaeology    3. Ancient World History    4. Archaeology    5. Archaeology / Anthropology    6. Biography    7. Egypt    8. Eighteenth dynasty, ca. 1570-1    9. Eighteenth dynasty, ca. 1570-1320 B.C    10. General    11. History    12. History: World    13. King of Egypt    14. Middle East - Egypt    15. Pharaohs    16. Archaeology and Ancient History    17. Classics    18. History / Egypt    19. Mind, Body, Spirit    20. Religion   


    $35.00

    Akhenaten: Egypt's False Prophet
    by C. N. Reeves, Nicholas Reeves
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (May, 2001)
    list price: $29.95 -- our price: $18.87
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    Reviews (10)

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Needed Reappraisal of Akhenaten
    In my view, Nicholas Reeves delivers a long needed reappraisal of Akhenaten's reign by arguing that most interpretations of this controversial Pharaoh--as a benevolent ruler who merely believed in the existence of One God are totally at odds with the surviving facts from his reign. Although Reeves' book is devoted to the monarch, Akhenaten does not take centre stage until the beginning of Chapter 4(p.75) when he accedes to the throne. In the previous chapters, Reeves meticulously lays out the rise of the New Kingdom Empire, the discovery of El-Amarna and the tremendous wealth that Egypt enjoyed under the prosperous 38 year reign of Amenhotep III, Akhenaten's father.

    Reeves argues, compellingly that rather than being a devout Monotheist(someone who believes in the existence of one God--the Aten here), Akhenaten used his Religious Revolution to cynically concentrate power in his hands--at the expense of more traditional political structures of Ancient Egypt such as the Amun Priesthood. The Amun priests were denied access to the considerable wealth of the Amun temples which had boosted the Egyptian economy after they had defied Akhenaten's wishes in his 4th Year. The wealth was instead conveniently diverted into the Treasury of the Egyptian state, ie. Akhenaten. Soon after, Reeves aptly notes that Akhenaten unleashed a Wave of Terror against anything remotely concerning the old religious order as his agents actively destroyed non-Atenist religious statues and hacked out the names and images of these gods wherever they occured--on Temple Walls, Obelisks, Shrines and even on the accessible portions of Tombs. Rather than being a king who wished to reform the traditional Priesthood, Akhenaten wished to create a New Order--his order.

    Reeves observes that the scale of the anti-Amun persecutions were so terrifying that mass paranoia reigned throughout Egypt. Archaeological discoveries have shown that many ordinary residents of Akhetaten chose to gouge or chisel out all references to the god Amun on even minor personal items that they owned--like commemorative scarabs or make-up pots--perhaps for fear of being accused of having Amunist sympathies. References to Amenhotep III, Akhenaten's father, were partly erased since they contained the traditional Amun form of his name. In the end, Akhenaten's revolution collapsed from within after his death since the enormous costs of founding a new capital city (ie. Akhetaten) at El-Amarna and the closing of the Amun temples choked off the growth of the Egyptian economy and created massive corruption among the king's state officials who held unprecedented control over all the wealth and produce of Egypt. Later Egyptians rejected Akhenaten's unhappy reign by systematically dismantling all his monuments, denouncing him as "that criminal from Akhetaten"(in an inscription by Ramses II) and abandoning Akhetaten, the seat of Akhenaten's religious Revolution, to the Desert.

    On other matters, Reeves rejects the view of a long 12 year coregency between Akhenaten and his father, Amenhotep III in favour of a shorter period of only one year. Reeves notes the clear evidence of docket EA 27--on a letter written to Akhenaten--dated to the latter's Year 2 plus the evidence from Amenhotep III's own tomb, in which the latter's name is always represented in the traditional prenomen nomen of Nebmaatre Amenhotep, rather than the anti-Amun "Nebmaatre Nebmaatre" form which omitted any reference to this king's Amun-inspired birth name.

    Finally, on the mysterious Dahamanzu who corresponded with Suppiluliuma of Hatti, the author demonstrates that this Queen could only be Nefertiti, rather than Ankhesenamun, as is traditionally believed. Reeves notes that the approximate time of the first correspondence by this newly widowed Queen--in the late Autumn season(ie.: September/October)when Suppiluliuma I was beseiging Carchemish--corresponds perfectly with the known time of Akhenaten's death when the bottling of the Wine from his Royal estates was taking place. One of his Year 17 wine dockets has even been changed into Year 1 of Akhenaten's successor(cf. CAH) which proves that Akhenaten had died during this process and to reflect this political change. Tutankhamun, by contrast, clearly died late in the Winter Season(December or early January) as the presence of the Blue Lotus flower in his tomb--which only blossoms in late February and early March--shows when one takes into account the traditional 70 day mummification process. The existence of a letter--EA 170--found in El-Amarna from one of Akhenaten's vassals in Canaan which makes reference to a Hittite attack on the city of Amki is undoubtedly the same one which Hittite Annals record as being in progress at the time of Dahamanzu's first correspondence; hence, the Egyptian Queen here can only be Nefertiti. In contrast, Tutankhamun had abandoned Akhetaten(El-Amarna) for Thebes at least 7 or 8 years prior to his death in his Year 10--a fact which eliminates the case for identifying Dahamanzu with Ankhesenamun.

    Reeves' excellent prose and penetrating insight into the real situation that Egypt was facing under Akhenaten's crisis filled reign shows the tremendous value of, and the amount of time which Reeves has devoted towards, this masterful work. I consider it a must read on Akhenaten's tumultous 17 year reign and its terrible aftermath which left behind a weak and chastened Egypt bereft of her imperial possessions in Syria(which had now been lost to the Hittites), and struggling to recover her confidence and belief in the divine kingship of Pharaoh. It took 3 different Pharaohs--Tutankhamun, Ay and Horemheb--to fix the mess that Akhenaten left behind.

    The sole regret which I have with this work is its relative brevity--at 194 pages--before you reach the Bibliography and Index sections. But this does not detract from its great value and I would wholeheartedly recommend it to the general reader.

    5-0 out of 5 stars hitting the reader on the brain
    Hitting Nail Head reviewer FELLOW shows little enlightenment in his comments. Limited intelligence, rather, all rote and book-learned thinking blazes thru, without a hint of common sense applied. I guess he never noticed Nefertitis eyes are BLUE, her skin is WHITE,and so are another couple of statues. He must be Art Deprived. OH WELL for you, nail hit on foot guy~your books must have had no illustrations.

    I guess he also didnt notice Tut is asian looking as well as African looking. There are egyptian queen statues (go view them in ART) that look ENTIRELY oriental, as well as ENTIRELY african, and ENTIRELY caucasian. Dont the jews who claim to be from egypt have red hair and blue eyes sometimes? They certainly dont cross breed in their hasidic sect, yet there it is to look at. Amazing logic Mr. Nail shows. Modern Day Madagascarians have GREEN eyes and wooly COPPER colored hair - take a trip and learn your facts. It too is in AFRICA. Its obvious to me all races sprang from egypt and exodused to where they split up and remained till today, more than likely when violent ROME invaded, controlled by fear, and they preferred peace/exodus to fighting back. How each RACE today looks, indicates how the TRIBE who left looked. There were at least 12 tribes we know of, right? Or did you forget much of the bible is depicting Egypt?

    Similar to how ALL DOG BREEDS stem from wolf, dingo, and fox mixed together, goes the logic of the races coming from Egypt. Egypt also PHYSICALLY went thru changing from very fertile, green land to desert as it is today, which would have caused an exodus of separate TRIBES to survive on better land. To mix the narrowed breeds of people we have today back together, you would result back with ALL the genes, looking like dingo, wolf or fox, i.e. EGYPTIAN originators, and people arent excluded from having racial, genetically-limited breeding same as animals.

    Atenism was the fuzzy beginning of Roman/Greco imposition of forcing the "harm is good" philosophy on Egypt, the REMOVAL of belief in THIS life, and to trade living oppression for " heaven later ". They knew it was a bogus trade and didnt bite. The oppressors rewrote the egyptian Bible (which would be along the lines of the Psalms) to include a new Greco/Roman teacher purporting that "we should trade a stinky present life for a vague reward after death" or "pain is good"- this to a culture that believed one god made them, they never die, there is NO heaven, they return again and again in repeated lives, and LIFE is to be not a sorrow, but the blessing itself. Of course, Egypt never swallowed that logic, or reversing their current beliefs, as it was wholely absurd to them. It was all about oppression and roman RULE, and Ankhenaton was most likely doing what he had to do to try to appease the romans and greeks, (i.e. gain full control, and break the strong religious spirit of the people that indicated future TROUBLE to the romans)...while keeping the best peace he could for his people. It was one of the earliest attempts by the roman invaders, to remove the religion of the egyptian people, and it failed just like the whole 'throwing to lions escapade' failed. The author is on the right track when he says "it was an attempt to remove contact with god from the people", and "make the egyptian subjects more dependant on the king THRU using their devout spirituality and "need" for communication with god, as a weapon". Totally right. Go learn your egyptian Mr. Nail, they had 30 commandments that BLOW AWAY the ten we are left with today, they were ULTRA good compared to christianity in the modern world (vegetarian, never make another cry, never kill ANY living thing, etc.) They didnt believe in "loopholes", or "animal headed folks", they believed in all-inclusive GOOD, ONE GOD.

    Mr. Nail, I contradict you, just as hinduism is today showing ASPECTS of ONE GOD'S personality thru varied pictures (strong elephant, all-reaching 8 armed, many-eyed all-seeing, etc), SO DID EGYPT draw him the SAME way. YOU probably also think HINDU = pagan, dont you. You need to broaden your horizons and learn a few basics. Egypt ALWAYS believed in one god, the invading roman/greco foreigners with THEIR OWN soap opera-ish, pagan diety pantheons mistook it for similarity on a personally-biased level, (they perceived what THEY were coming from)...and misrecorded it for history to come unravelled in the now.

    Rather than a genetic disease, Ahkenatons face more likely betrays over inbreeding. The pharoahs of egypt were brothers and sisters, married, which caused inbreeding- ALWAYS not just a couple of odd times. Mr. Ahkenaton probably got unlucky in the process of his accidental genetic draw.

    Good book for the new facts it shows. I bought it for the archaeological facts, NOT the opinions. :) If anything, Tut would have been murdered out of FEAR that what Ahkenaton did would EVER be repeated in the near future. Egypt and GOD were interdependant, not to be tampered with in the minds of the egyptians. Whats been left out, is that we're only pointing to Ahkenaton changing god's SYMBOL to "sun", and closing the temples. The facts omitted, are that this was only the tip of the iceberg - he tried to change ALL their beliefs and introduce the new "pain in life, pleasure in heaven" idea of oppression. It certainly couldnt have been ONLY a matter of symbol or something so small to cause his failure.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Compiled new results by a forcible story.
    This book is an interesting reading instead of archeological study.
    N.Reeves includes result of the new archeology that there is not in C.Aldred and D.B.Redford.
    However, a total style of reciting is forcible In a direction to affirm his insistence.
    I think that we cannot understand a king before 3,300 year with a human being general idea of the 21th century.
    It violates the same mistake that it considers him to be a pacifist and a devoted husband to liken him to a revolutionist and a dictator.
    Even if it is hard to understand a real image rising from a document , it is historical fact.
    I want to avoid judging a past with our value judgment of the present age.
    What this book should evaluate is to have arranged a point at issue about this time to a compact, and it's demeritto lack humility for the history. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0500051062
    Sales Rank: 38553
    Subjects:  1. Akhenaton,    2. Ancient - Egypt    3. Ancient Egypt Archaeology    4. Archaeology    5. Biography    6. Egypt    7. Egypt - History    8. Eighteenth dynasty, ca. 1570-1320 B.C    9. General    10. History    11. History - General History    12. King of Egypt    13. Pharaohs    14. Royalty    15. Social Science    16. Sociology    17. Akhenaton   


    $18.87

    The Discovery of the Tomb of Tutankhamen
    by Howard Carter, Howard, Carter, A. C. Mace
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 June, 1977)
    list price: $11.95 -- our price: $8.96
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    Reviews (9)

    5-0 out of 5 stars One of my favorite books
    I have a beloved hard copy that I've owned since sophomore year of high school when I learned about Howard Carter and Tutankhamen in A.P. History class. I was hooked and had to learn more. I've read that the first edition was actually two volumes but I haven't ever come across any copies yet.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fascinating
    If you love Epyptology, you'll love this book. Written like a diary, it will keep you on the edge of your seat, waiting for what's around the corner. A must read!

    5-0 out of 5 stars truely amazing!
    3 years ago my parents took me on holiday to Egypt, which I was very angry about at first because its was'nt a 'proper holiday' (too much education involved). Now I look back on it as the most inspirational 2 weeks of my life. This book compliments the travels perfectly. The book really shows how determined Howard Carter was to discovering Tut's tomb, and how close he got to never finding it at all. The book documents one of the greatest discoverys in the past century and will make you want to visit the tomb. Please read this book!! ... Read more

    Isbn: 0486235009
    Sales Rank: 74488
    Subjects:  1. Ancient - Egypt    2. Egypt    3. Excavations (Archaeology)    4. Excavations (Archeology)    5. General    6. History: World    7. King of Egypt    8. Sociology    9. Special Interest - Adventure    10. Tomb    11. Tutankhamen,    12. Tutankhamen   


    $8.96

    Middle Egyptian : An Introduction to the Language and Culture of Hieroglyphs
    by James P. Allen
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (04 November, 1999)
    list price: $43.00 -- our price: $43.00
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    Reviews (14)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Book...but Gardiner still worth it!!

    I am writing this review simply to clarify and answer a few of the questions and comments that the previous reviewer had about the textbook.

    1) This is a textbook intended for college students and self-study and assumes no previous encounter with English or Middle Egyptian grammar; therefore, as one might expect, the book presents descriptions of nouns, as well as more complicated aspects of grammar such as prospective, subjunctive and relative forms. However, if one is privy to the definitions, than one can simply skip over the descriptions of these grammatical aspects and continue learning Middle Egyptian.

    2) Rare usages or unusual translations are covered in the book and although they do not appear in an appendix, they do contain astericks or other diacritics or concise descriptions.

    3) Enough examples are provided so that an intelligent person can build upon previous examples and construct the answer to the exercise, similar to a math book that provides some examples and then offers more complicated, but solvable exercises.

    4) Although the book does lack grammatical paradigms (mostly since no one really knows what inflections Middle Egyptian contained) and vocabulary lists, it does provide references, a sign list, a dictionary, the answers to the exercises, and an index.

    5) The paperback binding is actually quite good. I have used it for a while and, although borrowed from the local library (most of those books are usually mistreated or handled periodically), it has shown little signs of deterioration. More importantly, there is at least a half inch spacial blank gap between any word or hieroglyph at the inner edge any page, making the inner edges easy to read.

    6) Although the chapter four essay argues that the "Western notion of religion [...] has seperated religion from spheres of [...] government, social behavior, intellectual pursuits, and science" p.43, it never states that this is how the western notion of religion always viewed and continues to view these concepts. The Egyptian religion embraced most things as the Gods themselves. For example, two people falling in love in Greek and Roman religion was an act of Eros, and love making a gift from Aphrodite; however, an ancient Egypian might argue that two people falling in love and making love is the personification of the love between Osiris and Isis.

    That said, this is a wonderful textbook that will leave any serious student or amateur the craving for more since, unfortunately, it does not cover all there is to know about Middle Egyptian. A second step would be to purchase Sir Alan Gardiner's "Egyptian Grammar" a little outdated but unmatched in depth and coverage of Middle Egyptian. His book remains the "BIBLE" of Middle Egyptian of and for most egyptologists.

    4-0 out of 5 stars An good text book!
    If you want to learn the basics of hieroglyphs. Dont buy this book first. Buy "How to Read Egyptian Hieroglyphs: A Step-By-Step Guide to Teach Yourself". Then buy the text book by Allen.

    Allens book is more a book for those that seriously wants to learn the language, not good as an introduction. But as a tool to learn hieroglyphs it is excellent and very detailed.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A real student's version of the venerable Gardiner grammar
    The main problem with Gardiner is that it presents information but makes little attempt to *teach* it.Data is shown context-free, with no awareness of the common errors likely to be made by students.It's a brilliant piece of work, and it is possible to learn to read hieroglyphs from it, but while it's a fabulous reference work, it's simply not a *teaching* book.It's a magnificent piece of work, but in such need of a pedagogical update as to render it as much a daunting obstacle as a real asset.Granted that learning to read Egyptian hieroglyphs will never be easy, a good teacher can certainly make it easiER.

    Allen does it, without sacrificing one scrap of rigor.Allen is the Gardiner grammar written with a desire to actually meet the dedicated, intelligent student halfway.It presents the information with a real sense of ... stepping back first and examining what is about to be presented, for want of a better way of putting it.It places the grammatical rules that it demonstrates in context, and relates them to one another, thus enabling the student to learn the *language* as a coherent, related thing and not simply a list of unrelated rules to be memorized.Most valuably, it also anticipates common errors and corrects them before they have become engrained as habit to the student.

    Granted, if the student happens to be gifted with languages and able to contextualize the grammatical and phonological rules themselves, Gardiner is quite adequate.But even a gifted student will appreciate Allen's desire to teach hieroglyphs as a derived whole as opposed to a disjoint set of rules presented rapid-fire like baseballs out of a pitching machine.

    Allen is the sort of book that people learn from.Gardiner is the book they buy and use constantly *after* they've learned from Allen. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0521774837
    Sales Rank: 89887
    Subjects:  1. African Languages    2. Ancient - Egypt    3. General    4. History - General History    5. Language    6. Language Arts & Disciplines    7. Egyptian    8. Language & Linguistics    9. Language Arts & Disciplines / General    10. Language teaching & learning material & coursework   


    $43.00

    Ancient Egypt
    by David P. Silverman
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (01 March, 1997)
    list price: $39.95
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    Reviews (13)

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Comprehensive Guide for Ancient Egypt
    While not exactly encompassing, it gives a great overview to the various parts of Ancient Egyptian life and history. Really good if you want to pick a specific part of Ancient Egypt to focus on!

    3-0 out of 5 stars Not good for the classroom
    Given the previous high reviews of this book I was hoping that this might replace Grimal's and a cultural atlas in a college history course on Egypt.Sadly it cannot.The essays will interesting and focused still are too general in some areas such as women and religion where it seems that there is no change over time in Egypt.That simply isn't true.In other sections, change is suggested but it isn't explained.Overall too little time is spent on each subject to justify its separation from the whole.A good solid introduction to the basic chronology and traditional history is covered in only 20 pages!I was so disappointed in the book that I'm returning it for a refund.I have specific and general books on Egypt already and this adds nothing to them.On the bright side, if you like a very general book then you should like this one because it is organized by topic and has very nice images and decent maps (not as good as others I've seen however).

    5-0 out of 5 stars Walk Like An Egyptian
    "Ancient Egypt" is the perfect antidote to those Time-Life books about ancient civilizations, where you look at the pictures and read the text and wonder, "is that all there is?"

    Well, of course there is. The problem is finding it. This collection of essays uses words, pictures, artwork and imaginative reconstructions to describe the ancient world ruled by gods and which built monuments that have lasted millennia.

    The book's 15 chapters opens all aspects of the Nile kingdom's world. In addition to the expected sections on the pyramids, its hieroglyphs and Pharaohs, "Ancient Egypt" also delves into religious beliefs, political campaigns, the role of women, the development of towns and trade and the daily rituals of its people.

    Wrapped around the text are superlative photographs, shorter articles about equally fascinating subjects (a profile of Ramesses the Great in the section on Pharaohs, for example, or on the "letters" to the dead, written on simple pottery bowls and deposited in the tomb or coffin), plenty of colorful reproductions of Egyptian art so vivid that the course of individual brush-strokes could be seen, and commissioned drawings giving theories of how pyramids were built, and what the Temple of Karnak must have looked like at its height.

    But what really shines are the little touches. A closeup of an Egyptian artist, his scruffy hair and scraggy beard making him look like a New York bohemian, using an odd-shaped tool on a wooden beam; the vivid face of a long-dead woman painted on a board and included with her mummy wrappings, gazing at the reader with the poise of nobility; a piece of prose passed among the scribes that mocks all other trades ("the potter is under the soil, although he stands among the living / He grubs in the mud more than a pig in order to bake his pots"); a drawing of a fortress built to impress the Nubians in southern Egypt, looking for all the world, with its towers and crenellations like something out of medieval Europe.

    So much about ancient Egypt seems so familiar, but, really, we were just watching "The Ten Commandments," or remembering the villain King Tut from the old Batman TV show."Ancient Egypt" shows us what we were missing. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0195212703
    Sales Rank: 163656
    Subjects:  1. Ancient - Egypt    2. Ancient Egypt - History    3. Archaeology / Anthropology    4. Civilization    5. Egypt    6. History    7. History: World    8. Middle East - Egypt    9. To 332 B.C   


    Religion in Ancient Egypt: Gods, Myths, and Personal Practice
    by Byron E. Shafer, John R. Baines, David Silverman, Leonard H. Lesko
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 July, 1991)
    list price: $18.95 -- our price: $18.95
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    Reviews (4)

    4-0 out of 5 stars A good resource; some parts better than others
    Prof. Shafer of Fordham University put this book together in order to fill the need for an English-language survey of ancient Egyptian religion. The result is a relatively short introduction to the subject from three points of view, each addressed by a different author. John Baines writes about the gods, Leonard Lesko about myths, and David Sliverman about religious practice. The idea and organization of the book is commendable; however, I felt that stronger editing could have made the three portions of the book more cohesive and compatible in quality.

    There was too much overlap between Baines' and Lesko's sections, and Lesko's chapter seemed to be aimed at a more specialized audience than were the other chapters. I felt that Baines dwelled too much on political history and took the focus off the topic at hand. His article would have benefitted from further subdivision; as it was, the overly long sections lacked clear direction. Baines handles concepts of divinity quite well, but I think he could have provided a better overview of the Egyptian pantheon. On the whole I would give his article a tentative 4 stars.

    Lesko's rather short chapter also placed too much focus on political history, and this was doubly frustrating since he didn't say anything different from Baines. His discussion of myths seemed to lack organization and was befuddling for the newcomer to the field. The chapter mostly consists of lengthy and inadequately explained or connected quotations from Egyptian texts. These texts are interesting sounding but cryptic, and Lesko does not provide enough of an overview for one to understand either what they are saying or why he is quoting them. His article has two chief sections: one on cosmogonies, which is very long and opaque, and a much shorter and somewhat clearer section on cosmology. Overall, this article deserves a tentative 3 stars from a newcomer; someone with more specialized knowledge might find it more useful, but I am not sure.

    Silverman's chapter was by far the most accessible and informative. Frequent divisions in the text underscored its points while providing strong organization and direction. Silverman's explanations started from basic concepts and worked up to address difficulties in modern methods of study in his field. His chapter came across as an interesting and informative social history of Egypt with particular emphasis on the origins of its structure and morality, both of which derive from religion. This article was engaging and clear, and earns an enthusiastic 5 stars from me.

    On the whole, then, some parts of this book were more readable and useful than others. However, it seems to be the most scholarly and trustworthy introduction to the topic. I would not recommend it as pleasure reading, but if you need to know something about the subject it is a good resource.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Clarifies Much
    This book is extremely useful for understanding the complex, multifaceted world of the ancient Egyptian Gods. One cannot simply list gods and myths and have them make sense; this book provides three Egyptologists' views on how the Egyptians saw the gods and the universe, how that view evolved in 3000 years, and how they were worshipped throughout that time. There are numerous illustrations, photos, and footnotes. The authors discuss theories about the Armarna period and the divine status of the Pharoah that cannot be found in other books on Ancient Egypt. This is a great book to read if you want to understand the religion as a whole and get the essence of what it was like.

    2-0 out of 5 stars disappointment
    It is only a historical book.There is no useful information for pagans. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0801497868
    Sales Rank: 276206
    Subjects:  1. Ancient - Egypt    2. Congresses    3. Cosmogony, Egyptian    4. Egypt    5. Religion    6. Religion - World Religions   


    $18.95

    Egyptian Grammar: Being an Introduction to the Study of Hieroglyphs
    by Alan Gardiner
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (January, 1957)
    list price: $62.00 -- our price: $62.00
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    Reviews (12)

    4-0 out of 5 stars So you know the alphabet-......
    Like everyone says, this is the book to have to study hiero. Sure some parts of it could have been updated over the last while but the basics are there- and lots of them! There's a dictionary in the back that I don't know what I would have done without.I don't know if taking this on on your own is such a good idea, but if you have a strong grammatical background then you will do well. I will never part with this book unless they pry it from my clammy hands.:)
    sorry about the visual.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Bible of Middle Egyptian
    Gardiner's book is the sine qua non for learning ancient Egyptian. Though somewhat dated, no other book is quite as exhaustive and most if not all professional Egyptologists have learned ancient Egyptian from this book. Although the book was originally written for the rank beginner, Gardiner assumes his readers are not idiots and it pays to know something of grammar, preferably some previous knowledge in an inflected language like Latin or Greek, or perhaps even some knowledge of linguistics, before taking the plunge. Students who aren't serious should stay away since the book will be quite worthless to dilettantes. This book, along with Faulker's "Concise Dictionary of Middle Egyptian", are the core for English speaking students who wish to master Middle Egyptian.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The standard bearer
    I actually learned hieroglyphs beginning with a different text, but then the course quickly graduated to Gardiner's text for those pursing historical studies in earnest, at the University of London in the 1980s.I have assembled a collection of more accessible books on how to learn hieroglyphs as refreshers (four such other texts, each of which has merits) but `Egyptian Grammar' by Gardiner remains the standard bearer of hieroglyph study.

    If you are truly interested in learning Egyptian hieroglyphs for an upcoming trip to Egypt or to visit a museum with a collection (I amazed a friend once by being able to read an inscription at the museum; I confessed that of the hundreds of 'paragraphs' of hieroglyphs in the collection, that that was one of only two I could decipher without my notebook), this text might not be the first choice.However, if you are serious about studying hieroglyphs and think it might become a lifelong avocation or even professional study, this is the text to get.

    Now in its third edition, the Gardiner text has been continually updated since its first publication in 1927 (the printing I have is from 1978).It consists of 33 lessons, each of which covers a particular facet of grammar, followed by a section on vocabulary and exercises.There are also several additional pieces, Excursus A, B and C, which cover historical information such as calendrical studies, funerary rites, and royal speech and address.The appendices cover vocalisation (Middle Egyptian), proper names, extensive lists of hieroglyph symbols and meanings (nearly 100 pages of such), and vocabulary arranged in both Egyptian/English and English/Egyptian formats.

    All that is needed for the language is covered in this text.The vocabulary follows interesting patterns, as does grammar and sentence structure, whichh can vary in ways similar to the direction of the writing.The pattern of hieroglyphs is variable. Generally, you always want to 'read into the face', i.e., the picto-glyphs will be facing the direction from which to start -- more often right to left than left to right, and columns go top to bottom. There are no punctuation marks and no word breaks -- this can make meanings hard to decipher.

    Consider the example:

    IAMNOWHERE
    which could be broken into
    I AM NOW HERE
    or
    I AM NOWHERE
    and in this case, context might not help provide which meaning is the true one. Or perhaps the author is poetical and sees the trouble of distinction and means that trouble to be present.

    No wonder hieroglyphs are hard!

    This is a heavy, academic text.It is not always user-friendly.The book assumes a high level of comfort with grammar and linguistic construction not only of English but of other languages as well.The student is introduced to transliteration early in the text, but the lessons continue using both picto-characters and transliterations throughout the entire volume.

    Of course, the Gardiner (3rd edition) text is by far the best academic and research tome (600+ pages), but hardly meant for the popular press. Look for this when beginning a doctorate or M.Phil. in Egyptology or Linguistics of the ancient world. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0900416351
    Sales Rank: 78708
    Subjects:  1. African Languages    2. Egyptian language    3. Foreign Language - Dictionaries / Phrase Books    4. Grammar    5. Language    6. Writing, Hieroglyphic   


    $62.00

    Ancient Egypt : A Social History
    by B. G. Trigger, B. J. Kemp, D. O'Connor, A. B. Lloyd
    Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (22 September, 1983)
    list price: $35.99 -- our price: $35.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Reviews (1)

    3-0 out of 5 stars excellent supplement
    An excellent supplement to a course on Egyptian history, it should be used with a more politically focused book or by an instructor who likes to spend hours going through the rulers and the major political/military events. The book does concentrate on a few periods in Egyptian history, but thenthe evidence does not allow for much detail. Written in a fairly clearmanner, a good instructor will find it useful and students will find manysections of it more interesting than the lists of pharoahs. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0521284279
    Sales Rank: 629673
    Subjects:  1. Ancient - Egypt    2. Archaeology    3. Civilization    4. Egypt    5. History    6. History - General History    7. Social Science    8. Sociology    9. To 332 B.C    10. African history: BCE to c 500 CE    11. Social Science / Archaeology   


    $35.99

    Ancient Egyptian Literature: A Book of Readings: Vol. 2, The New Kingdom
    by Miriam Lichtheim
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 April, 1978)
    list price: $18.95 -- our price: $18.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Reviews (8)

    5-0 out of 5 stars ?Go to the Source"
    Having read a number of books in recent months on Egpyt, Canaan, and Israel, I decided that I needed to go to the source to see for myself what the many partially quoted Egyptian texts actually say. Miriam Lichtheim's"Ancient Egyptian Literature - Volume I:The Old and Middle Kingdoms" was my starting point.

    The customer reviews recommended it - and what other customers have to say about a book is usually an important factor as to whether I will buy it.In this case, I was cautious and only bought the first volume.I enjoyed it immensely.

    Professor Lichtheim's aim was to provide an up-to-date translation of a representative selection of Egyptian Literature, and in preparing these she states that she has made full use of existing translations and studies.I found her introductorysurvey on the development of Egyptian literatureand her detailed explanation and notes of each text to be most useful in helping meunderstand what I was reading.

    This first volume includes translations of about 50 texts dating from the 5th dynasty of the Old Kingdom to the 14th Dynasty of the Middle kingdom - which covers the period c 2450BCE to c 1650BCE.The texts include tomb inscriptions, selected "Utterances" from the Pyramid texts, Didactic Instructions, Songs and Hymns, as well as three amusing andinteresting prose tales - The Tale of the Shipwrecked Sailor,ThreeTales of Wonder, and The Story of Sinuhe.

    The Didactic literature is also very interesting, generally being instructions from kings to sons on how to properly rule the kingdom after his death.But they also include such texts as "The Dispute between a Man and his Ba", "The Eloquent Peasant", "The Satire of the Trades", and the much (partially) quoted and often misquoted "Admonitions of Ipuwer".

    The book was worth buying for the this last item alone, since this text has often been describedas providing textual evidence of events leading up to the Exodus of the Israelites from Egypt. According to Professor Lichtheim, the only surviving text is on a 19th Dynasty Payprus comprising 17 pages of about 14 lineswith lacunae in various places, and she provides the complete translation of all that is still legible.In her explanation of the text, she discusses at some length whether the text is "a direct response to a calamity" or an "historical romance".Her conclusion is that "The Admonitions of Ipuwer has not only no bearing whatever on the long past First Intermediate Period, it also does not derive from any other historical situation" She believes it to be "the last, fullest, most exaggerated, and hence least successful composition of the theme 'order versus chaos'"Even if you have already decided that Ipuwer IS describing events leading to the Exodus, it is worth buying this book to read the translation of the full text by a scholar who has provided a most cogent explanation of its provenance

    I know this is going to be one of those books which I shall read time and time again.I thoroughly recommend it to other readers, and I certainly intend to obtain Volumes II and III.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Absolutely the best
    When I was learning to read Middle Egyptian, it was Lichtheim who kept me on track.She has a wonderful gift for translation.Her translations, while very close to literal, somehow manage to carry the atmosphere of the original without sounding as bizarre as a literal translation would.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Has All the Virtues Its Predecessor
    This is an admirable volume II, consistent with what made volume I my first choice.In this volume, there are monumental inscriptions, instructional literature (including some very amusing works on the scribal life), hymns (including the great hymn to Osiris, and the Akhenaten hymns to the Sun), selections from the 'Book of the Dead', some prose tales and a factual narrative.Introductions and notes are terrific. Ka's are left untranslated. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0520036158
    Sales Rank: 164637
    Subjects:  1. Ancient - Egypt    2. Collections    3. Egyptian literature    4. Literature - Classics / Criticism    5. Translations into English   


    $18.95

    Ancient Egyptian Literature: A Book of Readings: Vol. 1, The Old and Middle Kingdoms
    by Miriam Lichtheim
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 December, 1975)
    list price: $18.95 -- our price: $18.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France
    Reviews (8)

    5-0 out of 5 stars ?Go to the Source"
    Having read a number of books in recent months on Egpyt, Canaan, and Israel, I decided that I needed to go to the source to see for myself what the many partially quoted Egyptian texts actually say. Miriam Lichtheim's"Ancient Egyptian Literature - Volume I:The Old and Middle Kingdoms" was my starting point.

    The customer reviews recommended it - and what other customers have to say about a book is usually an important factor as to whether I will buy it.In this case, I was cautious and only bought the first volume.I enjoyed it immensely.

    Professor Lichtheim's aim was to provide an up-to-date translation of a representative selection of Egyptian Literature, and in preparing these she states that she has made full use of existing translations and studies.I found her introductorysurvey on the development of Egyptian literatureand her detailed explanation and notes of each text to be most useful in helping meunderstand what I was reading.

    This first volume includes translations of about 50 texts dating from the 5th dynasty of the Old Kingdom to the 14th Dynasty of the Middle kingdom - which covers the period c 2450BCE to c 1650BCE.The texts include tomb inscriptions, selected "Utterances" from the Pyramid texts, Didactic Instructions, Songs and Hymns, as well as three amusing andinteresting prose tales - The Tale of the Shipwrecked Sailor,ThreeTales of Wonder, and The Story of Sinuhe.

    The Didactic literature is also very interesting, generally being instructions from kings to sons on how to properly rule the kingdom after his death.But they also include such texts as "The Dispute between a Man and his Ba", "The Eloquent Peasant", "The Satire of the Trades", and the much (partially) quoted and often misquoted "Admonitions of Ipuwer".

    The book was worth buying for the this last item alone, since this text has often been describedas providing textual evidence of events leading up to the Exodus of the Israelites from Egypt. According to Professor Lichtheim, the only surviving text is on a 19th Dynasty Payprus comprising 17 pages of about 14 lineswith lacunae in various places, and she provides the complete translation of all that is still legible.In her explanation of the text, she discusses at some length whether the text is "a direct response to a calamity" or an "historical romance".Her conclusion is that "The Admonitions of Ipuwer has not only no bearing whatever on the long past First Intermediate Period, it also does not derive from any other historical situation" She believes it to be "the last, fullest, most exaggerated, and hence least successful composition of the theme 'order versus chaos'"Even if you have already decided that Ipuwer IS describing events leading to the Exodus, it is worth buying this book to read the translation of the full text by a scholar who has provided a most cogent explanation of its provenance

    I know this is going to be one of those books which I shall read time and time again.I thoroughly recommend it to other readers, and I certainly intend to obtain Volumes II and III.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Absolutely the best
    When I was learning to read Middle Egyptian, it was Lichtheim who kept me on track.She has a wonderful gift for translation.Her translations, while very close to literal, somehow manage to carry the atmosphere of the original without sounding as bizarre as a literal translation would.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Has All the Virtues Its Predecessor
    This is an admirable volume II, consistent with what made volume I my first choice.In this volume, there are monumental inscriptions, instructional literature (including some very amusing works on the scribal life), hymns (including the great hymn to Osiris, and the Akhenaten hymns to the Sun), selections from the 'Book of the Dead', some prose tales and a factual narrative.Introductions and notes are terrific. Ka's are left untranslated. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0520028996
    Sales Rank: 159750
    Subjects:  1. Collections    2. Egyptian literature    3. General    4. Literature - Classics / Criticism    5. Translations into English   


    $18.95

    HarperCollins German Concise Dictionary (Harpercollins Concise Dictionaries)
    by HarperCollins
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 December, 1999)
    list price: $15.00
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France
    Reviews (5)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Faithful and true
    I bought this dictionary when I first started learning German.I've been studying German for years and still use it.I still turn to this book first when looking for answers.This book will not teach you German.It is a dictionary, a very good one.

    3-0 out of 5 stars user-friendly but nothing too great really
    This is obviously a concise dictionary, but unlike for instance Webster's New World Concise German dictionary, this one would satisfy only intermediate level language needs and is kind of large for its coverage - compare for instance with the Oxford Pocket German which will do the same job except for the basic grammar part this one has at the back (despite all this both latter are more easy to use than the Webster's which is more sophisticated but also a little tiring to find words and then read). So this dictionary, i believe has no extraordinary features than its competitors and even some setbacks just mentioned.The grammar section is helpful but if you need more extensive coverage, and direct and rich grammar information beside each entry this wont do.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Great Dictionary for Students!
    I am a German instructor for adults working in the automotive industry. My students really appreciate this dictionary, especially the grammar section! Harper Collins dictionaries are always good for translators, but this one is perfect for intermediate-advanced students who also need a grammar reference. Great dictionary. I carry it with me when I'm teaching! ... Read more

    Isbn: 0062736841
    Sales Rank: 473222
    Subjects:  1. Dictionaries    2. Dictionaries - General    3. English    4. English language    5. Foreign Language - Dictionaries / Phrase Books    6. Foreign Language Study    7. German    8. German Language    9. Language    10. Polyglot Dictionaries    11. Reference / Dictionaries   


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