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    Cleopatra (Five Star Collection)
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    DVD (03 April, 2001)
    list price: $26.98 -- our price: $21.58
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Editorial Review

    This 1963 extravaganza, directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz, is certainly an epic historical drama with all the elements: elaborate sets, intricate costuming, name actors, a factual basis, and an overlong script (just over four hours). But the acting is well performed and the backdrops are lush, making this a film worth seeing. Elizabeth Taylor is Cleopatra, the Egyptian queen who seduces Julius Caesar (Rex Harrison) in a political move to hold onto her empire. When Caesar is killed in the Roman Senate, Cleopatra looks to Marc Antony (Richard Burton) for his support, practically enslaving him with her wiles. Taylor is dramatic in her role, at times overly serious, but stunning nonetheless as the woman described as "well versed in the natural sciences and mathematics. She speaks seven languages proficiently. Were she not a woman one would consider her to be an intellectual." While the film does seem to drag at moments, it deserves the four Oscars it won for cinematography, art direction-set direction, costumes, and special effects. Don't confuse this Cleopatra with the 1934 version directed by Cecil B. DeMille and starring Claudette Colbert. --Jenny Brown ... Read more

    Features

    • Color
    • Closed-captioned
    • THX
    • Widescreen
    • Dolby
    Reviews (112)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Leave it to Hollywood
    There's something about Hollywood always leaving gaps in films that deal with history."Cleopatra" did have great dialogue and one can't deny the great cast: Liz Taylor, Rex Harrison, Richard Burton. However, more lavish were the costume changes and the sets, it added color to such a historic and epic story.Some of the story ofcourse is changed to fit it into Hollywood standards. I enjoyed the film particularly that it offered a visual into the lives of history's most controversial figures.There's nothing to truly argue about but the whole issue of Hollywood re-writing history in a film does bug me as most of the time they will change the whole story around.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Lavish but where's the rest of it...?
    Where IS the rest of it?

    That may sound like an odd question given that "Cleopatra" runs 4 hours, but despite the lavish sets, clever dialogue, generally good performances, etc... there is nonetheless a certain "smallness" about this gargantuan piece of Hollywood history (which, if one adjusts for inflation, remains easily the most-expensive movie ever made).
    This "smallness" is hard to explain, except that I think it may have something to do with so many scenes occuring inside, with very little external shooting.

    As I understand, the original version was ~6 hours, which does seem a tad too long, but FOX made Mr. Mankeiwicz cut the film down, which he did to a length of about 5 hours and 15 minutes... THIS is the version that I'd like to see (but no one's apparently been able to find the footage) but the studio then took it and hacked it down to "only" 4 hours in 1963, some prints running less than 3(!!) Elizabeth Taylor is said to have vomited after publicly viewing the slashed-up version in London.

    It's also been said that the two stars missing from the 4 hour version (let alone the shorter one) are Rome and Egypt... I can believe it-- as there is a pronounced lack of a sense of "place" or location in the 4 hour cut, the version readily available.

    If they could reassemble the 5 1/4 hour cut, with that footage back in place, I wonder if the size and scope of "Cleopatra" would finally measure up to what it seems to be trying to promise at every moment. Because despite how long it already is, one senses that you've "missed" something throughout the movie.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Masterpiece!
    A great epic, Cleopatra, brings to the screen the story of one of the most well known historical figures.
    The film combines drama, action, and adventure, making it one of the best of its kind.
    Needless to say, the Hollywood heavyweights Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton, as well as the rest of the cast have truly outdone themselves with their performances, which are outstanding to say the least.The actors' incredible talent and chemistry clearly shows, thus providing a film that can be watched over and over again.
    The setting, the acting, the dialogues, the music, the battles and the costumes are all wonderful!
    History, Love, Passion, and Honor, are all about.
    There are no words to describe this multiple Oscar winning movie.It is simply amazing how a movie made in 1963 surpasses by far most movies that have been
    made in later years.A great marvel indeed!
    ... Read more

    Asin: B000059HAQ
    Subjects:  1. Feature Film-drama   


    $21.58

    The Ten Commandments
    Director: Cecil B. DeMille
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    DVD (01 April, 2003)
    list price: $19.99
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    Editorial Review

    Legendary silent film director Cecil B. DeMille didn't much alter the way he made movies after sound came in, and this 1956 biblical drama is proof of that. While graced with such 1950s niceties as VistaVision and Technicolor, The Ten Commandments (DeMille had already filmed an earlier version in 1923) has an anachronistic, impassioned style that finds lead actors Charlton Heston and Yul Brynner expressively posing while hundreds of extras writhe either in the presence of God's power or from orgiastic heat. DeMille, as always, plays both sides of the fence as far as sin goes, surrounding Heston's Moses with worshipful music and heavenly special effects while also making the sexy action around the cult of the Golden Calf look like fun. You have to see The Ten Commandments to understand its peculiar resonance as an old-new movie, complete with several still-impressive effects such as the parting of the Red Sea. --Tom Keogh ... Read more

    Features

    • Color
    • Closed-captioned
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    Reviews (190)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Alot of performances deserved an Oscar.
    This is one of those nearly flawless movies that come along every once in a blue moon. I've had a love affair with this movie since watching it for the first time on Easter Sunday, 1979. It's number 4 on my list of all time favorite movies. I say nearly perfect as DeMille took a little bit too much creative license when doing this movie. Moses in the movie is awestruck, but seems raring to go when faced with the Burning Bush, but in reality Moses didn't want this assignment, and was trying to bargin with God to send someone else, in the movie it shows Moses married only to one wife, but there's some notations in the Bible that this wasn't true. Dathan is in this picture, but in reality he wasn't mentioned until the book of Numbers, and finally the real biggie is where when Moses kills Baca in the movie he's brought before Pharoah then exiled, but in the Bible he runs away to the desert of Midian. Anyway, now that I've nitpicked some here I still say it's a wonderfully made film where just about everyone and anyone was in this picture. Of course Charlton Heston never looked so majestic before, or after for that matter, Vincent Price in one of his more villianous roles as Baca, one who I feel should've been nominated for an Oscar, and that was Edward G. Robinson for his portrayal of Dathan, but of course Edward is one of my favorite actors, but here he really hoofed it up. Then there's Yul Brenner as Ramasees, and Anne Baxter as Nefreteri, and don't forget the special effects, and wonderful direction, and narration by DeMille himself, so it really is one of Hollywood's masterpieces, and will never be duplicated, or remade to be this majestic ever again. It's inspiring to watch many times over and over again.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Excellent DVD Transfer
    This is not a review of this film, as it is completely familiar to almost everyone.However, I highly recommend this DVD for its quality.I have owned three different VHS versions of this film and a laser disc edition.This DVD transfer is, by far, the best ever offered to the public.The image is sharp and
    well defined and the sound is first rate.One minor flaw is that the "entr'act" music is not in stereo.When viewed on my computer screen, the image is the the widest I have ever seen of the VistaVision film offering the most complete frame image I have ever seen of this film on video.

    One final note, the commentary track by an author who wrote a most inadequate book on the making of The Ten Commandments, is
    filled with errors, lacks commentary during scenes that cry out for it and contains comments unrelated to the scenes being shown.Other than that I highly recommend this DVD.

    Matt

    5-0 out of 5 stars Finally, a Special Collector's Edition!
    I have always loved this movie since I was a child.I already own the VHS version of this movie but wanted it on DVD and since they came out with a Special Collector's Edition (2-disc), I decided to preorder the DVD.The movie on this DVD set still looks beautiful and the sound is good for its age too.The colors are still vibrant and dazzling.This movie looks surprisingly good for its age.My only complaint is that the 2-disc DVD set is in a thick DVD plastic box and you would think it contained a thick pamphlet or at least a paper insert.At least they packaged this DVD set in a plastic box instead of the cheap cardboard DVD boxes being put out now on a lot of old classics I've bought lately.

    I highly recommend this DVD set for anybody that loves old Hollywood epics and especially biblical epics.I love this movie.They just don't make movies like this anymore.It may be old-fashioned and over the top at times but this film can still entertain me and I've seen it at least 50 to 100 times.How many movies do you know of that you could watch over and over and never get tired of it?My rating:A ... Read more

    Asin: 0792154649
    Subjects:  1. Feature Film-drama   


    Mummies And The Wonders of Ancient Egypt
    Director: Lisa Bourgoujian
    Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
    DVD (28 August, 2001)
    list price: $14.95 -- our price: $13.46
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Features

    • Color
    • Box set
    Reviews (3)

    2-0 out of 5 stars Creepy in a Bad Way
    Why are cable documentaries so inferior to PBS documentaries?

    Every aspect of this documentary is second-rate - from the soundtrack to the stock footage to the writing. In the first episode, mummy footage is non-stop and disgusting. Actor voice-overs of Egyptian cult texts are creepy, often poorly placed, and outright maddening. The writing wanders all over the place and jumbles up the history of ancient Egypt into a mass of hyperbole and useless trivia - it's practically impossible to follow as coherent history.

    For teachers, do not buy this for your classes - no child or teenager with even the vaguest hint of ADD will want to watch this for more than 30 seconds.

    After the first few screenings, I like to have documentaries as background noise while I'm doing busy work at home. I can't even stand 15 minutes of 'Mummies' as background noise. I've given it two stars because it has SOME value historically.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Great overview of an ancient culture
    As its title suggests, this collection of four documentaries explores several aspects of the ancient civilization within the context of the Egyptian belief system.
    That is not to imply that the scope is overly narrow, it gives a good overview of the culture and explains how the Egyptians obsession with the idea of eternity fueled their rituals of mummification, construction of the pyramids, building of the sphinx, and even the development of hieroglyphics.
    The individual episodes may seem to not focus on their main subject and information in some episodes is repeated in others. But these are almost insignificant flaws in an otherwise fascinating documentary.

    4-0 out of 5 stars A good overview of the culture surrounding mummies
    This DVD is a compilation of four episodes from the History Channel narrated by Frank Langetta. You may remember his voice from the TNT/Lux movie "Moses" and the Artisan movie "Jason and the Argonauts."

    The DVD takes an interesting look at mummies by describing the culture and its world view that made mummification important. The film takes a look at the process of mummification first, then the burial situations, the monuments inspired by their views on life and death, and the language of hieroglyphics. There is a section on Tutankhamen's tomb as well as a bit of information on KV 5, the suspected burial tomb for Ramses II's sons.

    Some of the content on this DVD is updated and revisted in the other History Channel DVD set, "Beyond the pyramids." If you're interested in ancient history, even if not in Egyptology in particular, you will find this DVD to be informative and entertaining. It is well put together.

    If you are looking for "Extras" on the DVD, you won't find much. No secret gems I could find. ... Read more

    Asin: B00005MKOD
    Sales Rank: 28694
    Subjects:  1. Documentary   


    $13.46

    Egypt - Beyond The Pyramids
    Director: David de Vries
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    DVD (26 June, 2001)
    list price: $39.95 -- our price: $35.96
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Editorial Review

    The four programs from the History Channel in Egypt: Beyond thePyramids showcase current archaeological work that is changing howhistorians think about life in ancient Egypt. Some of the greatest temples andtombs of Egypt are visited, and authorities explain the significance ofparticular aspects of their construction. Efforts to restore temples that hadbeen lost under centuries of sand are shown, and one episode focuses on thediscovery of a massive complex of tombs in the Valley of the Kings, which onlybegan to be fully explored in the mid-1990s. The host of these programs, Britishactor Peter Woodward, presents the material skillfully, keeping the interviewswith scholars informative as well as entertaining. An episode focusing on thedaily life of ancient Egyptians even features Woodward putting on the sort ofmakeup that ordinary Egyptians are believed to have worn as both protection fromthe sun and a fashion statement. Visits to archaeological digs, including arecently discovered remote site that inexplicably contains hundreds of mummies,demonstrate how what we have known about Egypt may only be a fraction of what isstill left to be discovered. These programs are intelligent and the beautifulphotography makes them that much more enjoyable. --Robert J. McNamara ... Read more

    Features

    • Color
    • Box set
    Reviews (6)

    5-0 out of 5 stars An excellent documentary
    This four-part documentary serves either as a great introduction to Egyptology, or as an interesting look at some recent developments in the field.Though the series is numbered somewhat oddly (the third and fourth installments serve more as an introduction into Egyptian belief and culture, while the first two are more in-depth), it covers adequately a broad range of topics, and handles its subject manner well.Far from being just another picumentary of the Pyramids and Sphinx (hence the title), this film provides a beautiful and satisfying look at the wonders of Egypt while providing detailed related information.

    All in all, this is an excellent film.The section on KV5 was especially fascinating.In fact, the only thing I have to complain about was having to watch Peter Woodward put on Egyptian makeup in one of the episodes.This shouldn't be enough to drive you away, however; this is a great and informative film.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Woodward really gets into it!!
    This series is great fun to watch and quite informative. The cinimatography is superb and of course, Peter Woodward... He really makes it work. He is definitely into Egypt and his enthusiasm really makes the series come alive. The music overlays in this series is also very good and well produced.

    From the Valley of the Kings, to Giza and everything in between, "Egypt - Beyond the Pyramids" seems to take great pride in bringing us viewers into the ancient world of Egypt without ever leaving our living rooms... of course it will inspire you to leave your living room too!

    I went to Egypt in 2000, and seeing Peter Woodward narrating in the busy streets of Cairo was just as I remembered... about the only thing missing is the strong smells of herbs, spices, kebab, humid Nile air, nargila smoke, smog, and donkey doo-doo in the Cairene streets!! Oddly pleasant believe it or not! You really do get to see a lot of Egypt in these DVDs! Go get it then go to it!

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Wonderful Adventure
    Egypt - Beyond the Pyramids is an exciting adventure that explores Egypt's past.As host, Peter Woodward joins in the expeditions by interviewing archaeologists, excavating graves, squeezing into narrow crevices, and even dressing up as an Egyptian.His commentary is engaging and insightful. Instead of the usual scenes of crumbling ruins, computer animation gives a more lively and detailed view of the way the Egyptians lived---both rich and poor alike. ... Read more

    Asin: B00005ICEC
    Subjects:  1. Documentary   


    $35.96

    The Prince of Egypt - DTS Edition
    Director: Simon Wells, Steve Hickner, Brenda Chapman
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    DVD (08 February, 2005)
    list price: $19.99 -- our price: $17.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Editorial Review

    Nearly every biblical film is ambitious, creating pictures to go withsome of the most famous and sacred stories in the Western world. DreamWorks' first animated film was the vision of executive producer Jeffrey Katzenberg after his ugly split from Disney, where he had been acknowledged as a key architect in that studio's rebirth (The Little Mermaid, etc.). His first film for the company he helped create was a huge, challenging project without a single toy or merchandising tie-in, the backbone du jour of family entertainment in the 1990s.

    Three directors and 16 writers succeed in carrying out much of Katzenberg'svision. The linear story of Moses is crisply told, and the look of the film is stunning; indeed, no animated film has looked so ready to be placed in the Louvre since Fantasia. Here is an Egypt alive with energetic bustle and pristine buildings. Born a slave and set adrift in the river, Moses (voiced by Val Kilmer) is raised as the son of Pharaoh Seti (Patrick Stewart) and is a fitting rival for his stepbrother Rameses (Ralph Fiennes). When he learns of his roots--in a knockout sequence in which hieroglyphics come alive--he flees to the desert, where he finds his roots and heeds God's calling to free the slaves from Egypt.

    Katzenberg and his artists are careful to tread lightly on religious boundaries. The film stops at the parting of the Red Sea, only showing the Ten Commandments--without commentary--as the film's coda. Music is a big part (there were three CDs released) and Hans Zimmer's score and Stephen Schwartz's songs work well--in fact the pop-ready, Oscar-winning "When You Believe" is one of the weakest songs.Kids ages 5 and up should be able to handle the referenced violence; the film doesn't shy away from what Egyptians did to their slaves. Perhaps Katzenberg could have aimed lower and made a more successful animated film, but then again, what's a heaven for? --Doug Thomas ... Read more

    Features

    • Color
    • DTS Surround Sound
    • Widescreen
    • Animated
    Reviews (279)

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Movie For Everyone!
    This movie is truly "a movie for everyone", as it is a memorable movie, with even more memorable characters! And I'm taking this review a step further...

    I am not Christian, Catholic, Muslim, or a follower of Judaism. I do not believe that Jesus was the son of GOD, nor do I believe that the world was created in 7 days. I am a wiccan, a pantheist, a pagan. But regardless of my religion/beliefs, I still found this movie to absolutely extraoridnary!!!

    It did not bother me that is movie is about MOSES. Nor did it upset me when in the movie they spoke about a single god, the true god, the god of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob.

    My point is that this movie has something for everyone, no matter a person's gender, religion, sexuality, or ethnic background. Everyone will love this movie!!!

    5-0 out of 5 stars well worth a viewing, and a discussion
    I really enjoyed this movie.It was rather dramatic for a children's film, but a good way to teach children the story of Moses and the Exodus.For the most part, I found it pretty accurate.Some artistic license was of course taken, but the themes and ideas and major events seemed to be all there. I watched this movie as part of a Bible study, and afterwards we had a discussion about it; if you are concerned about any inaccuracies or ideas presented, then I recommend doing the same with your kids.

    The animation was absolutely beautiful.I particularly like Moses' dream, which is styled after Egyption drawings.The colors and scenery were also brilliant throughout the entire film.And the music was wonderful-- I believe Hans Zimmer was the composer...so if you enjoyed the music of Gladiator, you will like this score as well.Only one song irked me: "Playing with the Big Boys," which seemed cheesier than the rest of the movie and slightly out of place.

    I admit, this movie is not for everyone.It is not a typical happy animated film, and thus is likely not a good choice for young children.But it is good for older children, particularly those who know the story of Moses.It is deeper than other animated movies, and so many adults will enjoy it as well.

    Overall, I found the film very well-done and full of rich details.The only issues I can imagine people having with it are the few places where it strays from the story in the Bible, but as I said before, this opens the door to some good discussions, and I highly recommend giving it a try.

    3-0 out of 5 stars ADOPTIVE PARENTS BEWARE!!
    As a soon-to-be adoptive parent, I was disappointed in this movie.In general, I did think the story was wonderful!!However, I feel that its handling of "adoption" was very poor & a young adopted child could read bad things into the situation & what is indirectly said about adoption.When Moses realizes he was adopted, he sees his current reality as fake & wants to go back to his true identity of being Hebrew.Granted...there's a lot more going on....obviously Pharoah is the bad guy & Moses was supposed to go lead the Hebrews...But an adopted child might related to Moses as being adopted & feeling like he was living in a fake reality....Moses even implies that his brother isn't *really* his brother, although he still considers him to be his brother in spirit...and then Moses leaves and refers to Pharoah as the man he used to call father (i.e., before he knew better).This part of the story is all contrived, as it is not in Scripture -- and it is very unfortunate that this is in there.A young adopted child may not see past it. ... Read more

    Asin: B00004YNUN
    Subjects:  1. Feature Film Family   


    $17.99

    Mysteries of Egypt (Large Format)
    Director: Bruce Neibaur
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
    DVD (29 June, 1999)
    list price: $19.99 -- our price: $17.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Editorial Review

    Spectacular cinematography used in an innovative framework featuring noted actor and native Egyptian Omar Sharif provide a highly entertaining glimpse of ancient Egypt in this documentary from National Geographic.Sharif, playing a grandfather who is explaining the archeological wonders to his inquisitive granddaughter, does a fine job of explaining such puzzles as how the pyramids would have been built and what knowledge their builders must have possessed.The interludes between grandfather and granddaughter are handled well, but the star of the production is Egypt itself.Gorgeously composed shots linger over the pyramids, the Sphinx, and a plethora of temples, and a camera flown over the Nile provides stunning footage of the great river's meanderings.Reenactments of events, such as the building of the pyramids, the burial of King Tut, and the 1922 opening of his tomb, are presented intelligently.This production is sure to spark curiosity about ancient Egypt, and even without the careful handling of the history it would probably be worth watching just for the wondrous cinematography. A bonus at the end of the tape is a making-of documentary detailing how the film was shot on location.--Robert J. McNamara ... Read more

    Features

    • Color
    • Closed-captioned
    • Widescreen
    • Dolby
    Reviews (23)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent children's documentary.
    This is a favorite DVD in our house.It has stunning camera work, wonderful information and an excellent narrative.It portrays the glory of Ancient Egypt and the pride modern Egyptians still feel towards their heritage.

    Like all Imax documentaries it's only 40 minutes long and written at a fourth grade level.If you have a problem with those preconditions, don't watch Imax.We're homeschoolers and we love it.My children pay close attention, break out the Legos and start building pyramids of their own.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Bit Disappointed - Hardly any "Mysteries of Egypt" to see
    This was an excellent documentary on Egypt, with stunning footages and photography. But if you are looking for real Mysteries of Egypt and the investigative report on them, this surely is not the video you shall look for. From historical point of view and general overview of ancient Egypt, it certainly is a good one.

    The title is rather misleading......

    5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful Piece: Great Visually, and Performance
    This must have been excellent in IMAX.
    The combination of the wrap arounds done by Shariff ( sp? ) and a lesser actress, work superbly with this very good general introduction to AncientEgypt.
    I think even the Omnipresent Zahwi Hawass ( Sp?) makes an appearance in this work. If ever a man straddles the line between a godlike omnipresence, and amazing self-promotion, Zahwi achieves this, but despite that, its a great watch, and a useful addendum to any collection if you want to start a collection about egypt.
    ... Read more

    Asin: 6305462534
    Subjects:  1. Documentary   


    $17.99

    National Geographic's Egypt - Secrets of the Pharaohs
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    DVD (03 September, 2002)
    list price: $19.98 -- our price: $17.98
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Editorial Review

    Who's buried in Khufu's tomb?Find out in National Geographic's Egypt: Secrets of the Pharaohs, a wide-ranging look at the rituals and relics of one of the first monumental civilizations.Watch as one team of archaeologists braves the arid plains to investigate the construction of the great pyramids. Back in the lab, a group of medical archaeologists try to re-create the ancient Egyptian process of mummification step by step in a macabre sequence that vividly portrays the first steps toward immortality. Finally, venture deep into Pharaoh Khufu's tomb as one of the strangest treasures of all is unearthed: a complete ship destined to carry him through the Land of the Dead. A National Geographic map of the Nile Valley accompanies the video and is both helpful for reference while viewing and a valuable resource in its own right. --Rob Lightner ... Read more

    Features

    • Color
    • Closed-captioned
    Reviews (1)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fascination in the class room
    This video has been watched in deadly silent fascination by hundreds of students in my Art History classes.I am ordering it again because sombody liked it so much he borrowed it and never returned it.Not only does if give welcome relief from the artifacts and dynasties as it attempts to explain how average Egyptians lived, it gives plausable explanations for age old mysteries--like how the pyramids were really built.But what interested many of the students most is the sequence on mummification using a recently deceased body donor.You can compare him to Ramses the Great. ... Read more

    Asin: B00006AUK2
    Subjects:  1. Documentary   


    $17.98

    National Geographic's Egypt - Quest for Eternity
    Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
    DVD (03 September, 2002)
    list price: $19.98 -- our price: $17.98
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Editorial Review

    The sheer scope and size of Egyptian antiquities are breathtaking enough; their beauty is often just as startling. The National Geographic video classic Egypt: Quest for Eternity guides viewers through the greatest and most striking of the long-standing treasures, including favorites like the Sphinx and the Great Pyramids of Giza as well as lesser-known sites and artifacts.The temples of Luxor and Karnak appear as majestic today as they did thousands of years ago, and the Nile valley, though somewhat tamed, still provokes a sense of awe. Though produced in the early 1980s, the information is still on target. It's hard not to be dazzled by the achievements of the Egyptians, and National Geographic's sharp videography and careful research showcase these stars of the ancient world. --Rob Lightner ... Read more

    Features

    • Color
    • Closed-captioned
    Reviews (7)

    3-0 out of 5 stars A dated documentary that leaves out most of the good stuff
    Let me start by saying what Egypt: Quest For Eternity is not: it is not a video about the Pyramids (or, for that matter, pyramids of any sort) or the Sphinx - the three pyramids at Giza and the Sphinx appear in one quick shot, and that is it. I find it really peculiar that the most famous and fabulous of the ancient monuments were not mentioned, especially given the fact that the video begins its exploration at the earliest sites of Egyptian civilization and works it way up to modern Egypt. On the other hand, I find it ironically fitting that the Pyramids are not mentioned in a presentation about ancient Egypt's quest for eternity, as I agree with the vocal minority of those who say the Pyramids were not tombs of any sort.

    So what is covered here? Not a whole lot, given the rich history of Egypt extending back some six thousand years (longer, I would argue). We see some excavation at perhaps the earliest site of human settlement beside the Nile, work our way through several incredible temples such as those at Luxor and Karnak, get a brief look inside the structures at the Valleys of the Kings and Queens, revel in the sight of a number of structures dedicated to Seti I and Ramses II, get a cursory look at the Temple of Isis (which was converted into a Christian church many centuries ago), and then get some perspective shots of modern Egypt. Along the way, we are treated to a number of beautiful wall decorations and hieroglyphics telling the stories of the pharaohs and their gods.

    The real theme of this video is protect and preserve, as much of it dwells on the exquisite artwork incorporated into ancient monuments and modern man's efforts to preserve that historical record before it is lost. The video also describes the dismantling, moving, and reassembly of two magnificent temples threatened by the building of the Aswan Dam. When you come right down to it, the only quest for eternity featured here is that of Ramses II who enjoys most of the time in the spotlight.

    This is all well and good, but the contents of the video don't correspond with my own conception of the ancient Egyptian quest for eternity. Sure, the afterlife of the pharaohs is discussed to a limited degree, but I wanted to hear about mummification and the building of the truly incomparable monuments at Giza. I can see how some viewers would be bored by the presentation here, as "the good stuff" is basically neglected, and the film really looks its age (it dates back to 1982). If you are fascinated by everything Egyptian, there is certainly much to appreciate here - I for one learned a number of things from it - but if your interest is only in the Pyramids and the Sphinx, this National Geographic Production is apt to leave you disappointed.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Great Documentary Butchered in DVD Release! (Get the VHS!)
    In their long history of classic documentaries, one of my favorite National Geographic's was the 1982 "Egypt: Quest For Eternity" narrated by the late Richard Basehart. Frequently I have used the VHS edition in my class on Western Civilization as a good way of illustrating some of the points about Egyptian civilization to my students. When I learned that this program had been given a DVD release, which is rare for these classic National Geographic programs, I immediately bought it.

    What a waste of money! For reasons totally impossible to fathom, National Geographic and Warner Video have packaged a butchered version of this documentary that runs only 43 minutes (not 60 minutes as the packaging falsely claims; that is the length of the original version), has totally snipped the opening prologue and the wonderful title credits with the best version of Elmer Bernstein's theme music, and hacked out whole sections at random. Only when fast forwarding to the end did I realize what had happened. This DVD version is a 1994 re-edited version done for the National Geographic Channel and other cable channels today where a shorter running time is dictated by the presence of commercials that was not the case on PBS, where this first aired.

    Okay, so today this has to air on cable in a butchered format, but what is the excuse for giving the home video viewer this butchered version instead of the original full-length version that has been available on VHS for 15 years? None whatsoever! Shame on National Geographic and Warner Video for this disgraceful packaging of a classic documentary (this is akin to packaging edited versions of classic TV programs on DVD instead of the original uncut versions) and avoid the DVD at all costs! (But by all means get the VHS version which is a four star presentation!)

    3-0 out of 5 stars Dull
    This video is old and shows it.It has many facts, but presents them in a way that loses my attention.For pure information, it is good. ... Read more

    Asin: B00006AUK3
    Subjects:  1. Documentary   


    $17.98

    Cleopatra: The First Woman of Power
    VHS Tape (27 September, 1999)
    list price: $19.95 -- our price: $18.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Editorial Review

    Who was Cleopatra? Most think of a sultry Elizabeth Taylor seducing theRoman Empire through its leaders. But history has been written by the winners,and the successors of the Romans painted her with their own colors.Cleopatra: The First Woman of Power examines her life throughcontemporary Egyptian sources, from her Greek birth through her canny 20-yearrule of Egypt. Anjelica Huston narrates this powerful and thought-provoking filmthat uses often-funny footage from Hollywood, contemporary shots of theMediterranean, and interviews with historians to show a strong woman whosenobility survives centuries of slander. The formerly one-dimensional queen livesand breathes for the viewer of Cleopatra: The First Woman of Power.--Rob Lightner ... Read more

    Features

    • Color
    • NTSC

    Asin: B00001TZ50
    Subjects:  1. Documentary   


    $18.95

    Great Pharaohs of Egypt
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    VHS Tape (28 October, 1997)
    list price: $59.95 -- our price: $56.95
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    Features

    • Color
    • Box set
    • NTSC
    Reviews (3)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Inbreeding Very Much So Allowed: The 32 Dynasties Of Egypt!!

    This edition of `Cable in the Classroom' consists of four different parts and episodes concerning Egypt's Kingdoms. This series' aim's to give a quick, but carelessly and neglectfully rushed, overview of the XXXII Dynasties. It's this assuming plan of A&E's that somewhat wrecks informing the viewer about Ancient Egypt's pharaohs-they're unholy many to be compressed into a restrictive timeslot. A number profiled have problematically differing times devoted to them, violently ranging from minutes to half hours. This supplementary dilemma is bothersome because the miscalculating show prejudicially, usurpingly devotes grossly more time to well-known pharaohs like Akhenaten, Ramses II and Cleopatra. This show bypasses lesser known pharaohs, in which there's more of an interest to explore, due to this inequality of the amount of research devoted to them.

    Illustrating this is the suffocative limit handed the pharaohs in the show's 1st hour, the earliest ones science can call pharaohs, as they were originators of the Old Kingdom. The 1stwas Narmer, the 1st pharaoh to unite Lower AND Upper Egypt-represented by the white crown for Upper, the red crown for Lower-who's evidence for his pharaonic rule was discovered courtesy of the Narmer palette, a simple stone tablet inscribed with his events. Narmer was also the founder of Egypt's most significant city, Memphis, first known as the "White Walls", named representing its use as a fortress for Narmer, originally. Further proof of this show crumbling to the mainstream's its refusal to explore this lesser known pharaoh fuller, resulting in harm of not explaining that Narmer and his successor, Aha, could've been the same.

    The 3rd dynasty produced its most noteworthy pharaoh, Djoser, its 2nd. He started the temporary craze of pyramid building with his trial, unsophisticated, and 1st pyramid-the Step Pyramid-at Saqqara, which would be furthered by successive pharaohs, Snefru and his sons. Arguably, according to Bob Brier, the next, 4th dynasty contained the most impressive of royal bloodlines, beginning with Snefru, who started this family's hypnosis with pyramid building, starting at Maidum (which was a lesser stepped, step pyramid), then two final ones at Dahshur, the Bent Pyramid, and then his 1st usable pyramid, the Red Pyramid. His son and grandsons, Khufu, Khafre and Menkaure, are answerable for the building of the tourist-shrine, the Great Pyramids at Giza.

    It's with Dynasty VI-the Old Kingdom's last-that this show explains that grave destabilization, from what was centralized power dictated by pharaohs, now being mountingly seized by lesser nobles and viziers, infected this dynasty's pharaohs. This started with Pepy I, and carried over to his young and inexperienced son, Pepy II. More signs of this overthrow are presented in a plot planned by one of Pepy I's wife's, Were-Imtes, to murder Pepy I. Her scheme-which several other members of the royal court colluded with-was discovered before execution. The punishment was implacable. Were-Imtes and the others chose suicide in front of members of the court-much improved fate than if they were tried and convicted: public execution by impalement. Regardless, Pepy I died before seeing any punishment imposed. Pepy II, who was pharaoh at a grisly young age after Merenre died, had this accursedness continued against him, having power eroded from him and degrading into ineffectual leadership, also because of his advanced age, due to worsening disloyalty of officials who now usurped larger and larger lands under their control.

    Unsurprisingly, after the 6th Dynasty, Egypt plummeted into chaos, the 2 Intermediate Periods. This descent into disorganization culminates with the most genocidal disparagement in the minds of Egyptians: foreign rule from non-Egyptians. Before the 18th Dynasty emerged, there were the Hyksos. Stealthily settling further into Egypt's boundaries, they tyrannized rule from the Egyptians bloodlessly, by mass migration. Rebellion came in the form of a true Egyptian family, originating with Sekenenretao, who was murdered while battling the Hyksos. His son, Kamose, modeled his father and succeeded in banishing the Hyksos. After his death, his brother Ahmose started the 18th Dynasty, the New Kingdom, Egypt's most dominating bloodline. Here we find Egypt's first cross-dressing pharaoh, Hatshepsut, who seized control from the child heir-apparent, Thutmose III, going so desperate to wear a forged bear and assume the king's crook and flail-all symbols of pharaonic authority-to impose herself as the pharaoh, because female pharaohs were outlawed. Also in Dynasty 18, we have Akhenaten-either a madman, by radical Egyptian purists-or a visionary, thousands of years ahead of his time, the 1st person in history to embrace monotheism by worshipping the phony sun god Aten, although it was still the wrong god.

    Approaching conclusion, this show covers dynasties whose might was the last of other dynasties' comparable peak, or where pharaohs' power was already so encroached upon, they were "ruling" figureheads. In 19th Dynasty's Seti I's case, like his father Ramses I, he wasn't of noble blood, but a long line of military leaders. Besides an extremist builder, he also was successful with the military, leading plethora of attacks and suppressing many mutinies. His successor could be-as Egyptologists hyperbole-the greatest pharaoh, achievement wise. Ramses II built the tallest statues depicting a ruler, at Abu Simbel, the most temples, asphyxiated the Israelites, signed the 1st non-aggression treaty (after losing his favorite wife, Nefertari, lost interest in conquering Kadesh and other military goals to focus on building for afterlife), expanded Egypt's borders significantly and ruled for the longest 67 years. His follower, in namesake, Ramses III, is forever interwoven with the esoteric Sea People, whom he eventually snuffed. The 32nd Dynasty, the Ptolemies, fit into the tarnish of ruling as figureheads in a time of elevating diminishment of Egyptians' clout. A&E closes with Cleopatra-last surviving member of her dynasty-the whore, who single-handedly sealed hers and Mark Antony's fate of massacre at Actium by Octavian Augustus, after daring to be a foreigner who overstepped into Rome (which incurred the scorn of the Senate, because non-Romans were barbarians), and rumored to have tried to enfeeble Rome with her womanliness.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Line your mummies up all in a row
    I find history interesting and especially Egyptian history. As with most A&E Biographies they put they emphasize certain aspects of each dynasty and ignore others; however this is a pretty good overview and a good place to start.I have two problems; One is getting the Pharaohs out of order and the other is getting facts mixed up with movies. This series clears most of that up. What a shocker to find Cleopatra to be different than the one in these versions:
    Cleopatra (1934) ASIN: 6303382959
    Cleopatra (1963) ASIN: 6301717570
    Cleopatra (1999) ASIN: 6305496048
    There is an earlier version but I do not think it is commercially available.
    Prepare to watch them all at once as they are addicting.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Well informed video to delite the senses.
    I found the Video pack to be very informative, and gives a rich history and background into the lives of the more well known Pharaohs of Ancient Egypt. Also enjoyed the re-enactments scenes throughout the video, we welldesigned backgrounds, props, and actors. ... Read more

    Asin: 0767002733
    Sales Rank: 14808
    Subjects:  1. Documentary   


    $56.95

    Cultural Atlas of Ancient Egypt (Cultural Atlas of)
    by John Baines, Jaromir Malek
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (01 October, 2000)
    list price: $50.00 -- our price: $31.50
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    Reviews (3)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Excellent maps and illustrations
    As Baines and Malek explained in their introduction, they attempted to make this atlas useful for those readers who might plan to travel to Egypt and visit the ancient sites.The authors made good on this claim by devoting over half of the atlas to a section entitled "A Journey Down the Nile", which provides a survey of ancient sites that are encountered while traveling down the Nile from Elephantine towards the Delta.Archaeological finds are briefly introduced for each location through a combination of discussion, illustrations, and frequent maps.Since this part of the atlas is organized according to geography (south to north along the Nile), sites from different historical periods are inevitably mixed together, which leads to a confusing sequence of, for example, Ptolemaic temples followed by New Kingdom tombs followed by Predynastic graves and so on.While this arrangement might be useful as a travel guide of sorts, armchair travelers (like myself) who expect a continuous development of ideas may be disappointed.Perhaps if the authors had organized their "Journey" chronologically as well as geographically, this atlas would have had more of an impact on its readership, especially when reinforced by the plethora of photos, illustrations, and maps that are present.

    Despite this misgiving, I thought that the short articles that constitute the remainder of the atlas were informative and interesting.Topics covered in these articles include Egyptian art, religion, and writing, among others.And of course, numerous photos and diagrams are provided that are a pleasure in and of themselves.

    As far as I'm concerned, the major strengths of the "Cultural Atlas of Ancient Egypt" are the excellent historical maps, the floor diagrams of the major sites, and the visual delight provided by the beautiful photos.Although the geographical framework is a limitation, the strengths outweigh the weaknesses, and this book will probably be able to satisfy the "Egyptomania" fix of many readers.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A superb guide.
    I have loved traveling to Egypt for years and have devoured everything decent I can find to read about this country and its people. If you want to understand the Egyptians this volume is one good place to start.

    5-0 out of 5 stars An intellectual and visual delight
    This is the second edition of one of the finest summations of ancient Egyptian civilization ever written for the general reader. Not only is this an exellent introduction to many aspects of Egypt, it is a visual delight. The maps, especially, configure in the reader's mind spacial relationships and their cultural implications. Other illustrations of temple precincts and related architectural elements of Egyptian life supplement the excellent writing, written for, but never "down to" non-specialists. If I were to own only one reference work on ancient Egypt, this would be the one. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0816040362
    Sales Rank: 147840
    Subjects:  1. 332 B.C-638 A.D    2. Ancient - Egypt    3. Ancient Egypt - History    4. Antiquities    5. Atlases - Historical    6. Civilization    7. Egypt    8. History    9. History - General History    10. History: World    11. Reference    12. To 332 B.C   


    $31.50

    The Complete Valley of the Kings: Tombs and Treasures of Egypt's Greatest Pharaohs (Complete)
    by C. N. Reeves, Richard H. Wilkinson, Nicholas Reeves
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (01 October, 1996)
    list price: $34.95 -- our price: $22.02
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    Reviews (13)

    5-0 out of 5 stars excellent
    Excellent book, if you are interest in ancient egypt, read this book, you'll learn a lot of interesting facts about the valley of the kings, the pharaohs, etc..

    5-0 out of 5 stars A True Complete Book on the Valley of the Kings
    It is the best book on the Valley of the Kings. In it you can find not just information but a treasure, a treasure showing the magnificent treasures of ancient Egypt.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Almost completely perfect
    The Complete Valley of the Kings is a very well-researched, well-written, well-illustrated, and well-organized book.Everything from the topographic and the geologic maps of the valley through the religious and archeological history of the valley were interesting (and sometimes depressing, considering what some of those early adventurers and so-called scholars did to the place).The information on the dismantling of the Valley at the end of the 20th and beginning of the 21st Dynasty was especially interesting.Of course, the stars of the book were the tombs themselves.The architecture, decoration and history of each tomb is given as fully as possible.My only reservation in regards to this book lies in the authors having made up their minds on the identity of the controversial mummy in KV55 and airily dismissing as unimportant any evidence that contradicts their theory.Such inflexible partiality calls for a cautious approach to any other "definite" conclusions the authors draw.Otherwise, the book is inarguably informative and entertaining, except for the fact that the authors consistently and annoyingly use the Greek forms of the pharaoh's names (such as the Greek Sethos instead of Seti).Other than that, the book really is almost completely perfect. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0500050805
    Sales Rank: 75440
    Subjects:  1. Ancient - Egypt    2. Ancient Egypt Archaeology    3. Antiquities    4. Archaeology    5. Archaeology / Anthropology    6. Architecture    7. Egypt    8. Excavations (Archaeology)    9. Valley of the Kings    10. Valley of the Kings (Egypt)   


    $22.02

    The Complete Tutankhamun: The King, the Tomb, the Royal Treasure (Complete)
    by C. N. Reeves, Nicholas Reeves
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 April, 1995)
    list price: $19.95 -- our price: $13.57
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    Reviews (11)

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Splendors Of The Boy Pharaoh
    Since the sensational discovery of the Boy Pharaoh Tutankhamun's almost intact tomb in the Valley of the Kings in 1922 there has been a regular stream of books dealing with the tomb, its discovery, and the rich bounty of treasures found in the burial. The books vary greatly in quality but I have to say that Nicholas Reeves' 1990 work on the subject "The Complete Tutankhamun: The King, the Tomb, the Royal Treasure", is without a doubt one of the very best on the subject and is full of informative information and historical background, and beautifully presented colour and black and white photographs on the subject all displayed in an easy to read format that has a logical flow to it. Indeed "The Complete Tutankhamun", is a small jewel box in itself and is essential reading for all budding Egyptologists or people interested in the customs and religious beliefs of ancient civilisations such as Egypt.

    Beginning with a highly appropriate forward written by the present Seventh Earl of Carnarvon the format of the book is very well thought out and takes the reader firstly through the time that Tutankhamun lived in which of course was the controversial Amarna period created by the "Heretic Pharaoh", Akhenaten. This section provides much needed information on Tutankhamun's life much of which is still largely unknown to us. It deals with the Pharaoh's childhood and his eventual succession to the throne of Egypt as a 8 year old God and most interestingly looks at other monuments that Tutankhamun was responsible for creating during his short 9 year reign, most of which were usurped by later rulers. Later sections explore in detail the search for the tomb of the mysterious boy Pharaoh and its eventual discovery and excavation by Howard Carter. The tomb itself , small and largely undecorated compared to other Pharaoh's tombs is examined in an often interesting manner using three dimensional drawings to show its layout and side views. Finally the burial and the tomb's magnificent treasures encompassing golden shrines, jewellery, solid gold coffins, exotic animal figurines, and clothing are examined in detail. This section of the book is in particular a treat as the stunning colour photography really shows each piece described to its best advantage.

    When one thinks of Tutankhamun's tomb one always thinks of gold and jewels however one of the great strengths of "The Complete Tutankhamun", is that good coverage is given to the myriad of personal and domestic objects that accompanied a Pharaoh on his journey to his new life. Interesting examinations of food stuffs, clothing, board games, and even touching family heirlooms like a boyhood bow and arrow belonging to Tutankhamun's childhood and a lock of Tutankhamun's Grandmother Queen Tiye's hair are examined and it is these less spectacular items that go a long way towards showing the reader more about just who Tutankhamun was as both boy and Pharaoh. Each section of the book is accompanied by a huge selection of photographs that are both from the time of the discovery of the Tomb of Tutankhamun and more recent ones photographed at the Cairo Museum. Those photos that are contemporary with the discovery of the tomb are of great interest and reveal the painstaking work involved in the clearing and cataloguing of even a small tomb such as Tutankhmaun's. Rarely has a book on this subject managed to incorporate photos of so many of the items from Tutankhamun's tomb which helps make "The Complete Tutankhamun", one of the definitive sources of information for the modern reader about a Pharaoh's burial and of Tutankhamun and Egypt near the end of the Eighteenth Dynasty.

    "The Complete Tutankhamun", is one of my most cherished books on Ancient Egypt and I strongly recommend it to history and art lovers as one of the best sources of information on the Egypt of the glorious Eighteenth Dynasty. Egpyt of the time of the Pharaohs always seems to have a real attraction to even those people not greatly interested in history and this beautiful book is just the thing to satisfy anyone curious with this fascinating young ruler during Egypt's golden age. Make this gem part of your history library soon it is sure to become a treasured acquisition that you will find yourself returning to time and time again.

    4-0 out of 5 stars The tomb and its "treasures" are the real focus.
    If you want a multitude of pictures and a fair discussion of the tomb's discovery and the objects found in it, then this is an excellent book.We used this in a grad/undergrad level seminar I took back at Columbia University because it is so detailed on the tomb and its discovery.However, when it comes to information about Tutankhanum himself there are only 20 pages that look at his life and the historical context of his life, most of that is spent on his family and the dynasty he is part of.20 pages out of 200+?!This is why I'm giving this book only 4 stars -- the cover and the summary offered by the book itself suggests the book has three parts and this first one is barely there.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Complete Tutankhamun......THE BEST
    This it is the best book than I have seen related young king Tutankhamon, with an exquisite and impeccable design, besides to have an excellent bibliographical quality. My English is very basic, for that reason I cannot continue describing to this book jewel ... Read more

    Isbn: 0500278105
    Sales Rank: 32339
    Subjects:  1. Ancient - Egypt    2. Ancient Egypt Archaeology    3. Antiquities    4. Archaeology    5. Archaeology / Anthropology    6. Egypt    7. History: World    8. King of Egypt    9. Tomb    10. Tutankhamen,    11. Tutankhamun,   


    $13.57

    The Discovery of the Tomb of Tutankhamen
    by Howard Carter, Howard, Carter, A. C. Mace
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 June, 1977)
    list price: $11.95 -- our price: $8.96
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    Reviews (9)

    5-0 out of 5 stars One of my favorite books
    I have a beloved hard copy that I've owned since sophomore year of high school when I learned about Howard Carter and Tutankhamen in A.P. History class. I was hooked and had to learn more. I've read that the first edition was actually two volumes but I haven't ever come across any copies yet.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fascinating
    If you love Epyptology, you'll love this book. Written like a diary, it will keep you on the edge of your seat, waiting for what's around the corner. A must read!

    5-0 out of 5 stars truely amazing!
    3 years ago my parents took me on holiday to Egypt, which I was very angry about at first because its was'nt a 'proper holiday' (too much education involved). Now I look back on it as the most inspirational 2 weeks of my life. This book compliments the travels perfectly. The book really shows how determined Howard Carter was to discovering Tut's tomb, and how close he got to never finding it at all. The book documents one of the greatest discoverys in the past century and will make you want to visit the tomb. Please read this book!! ... Read more

    Isbn: 0486235009
    Sales Rank: 74488
    Subjects:  1. Ancient - Egypt    2. Egypt    3. Excavations (Archaeology)    4. Excavations (Archeology)    5. General    6. History: World    7. King of Egypt    8. Sociology    9. Special Interest - Adventure    10. Tomb    11. Tutankhamen,    12. Tutankhamen   


    $8.96

    Yalla: Hitlist Egypt
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Audio CD (14 September, 1990)
    list price: $11.98
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    Editorial Review

    For this album, released in 1990 and still the best compilation of modern Egyptian music around, David Lodge divvied Egyptian pop into working-class shaabi music and the upscale, educated, urban al-jil ("generation") sound, and devotes six rambunctiously appealing tracks to each. In al-jil the ongoing struggle between Islamic conservatism and a secular society tempted by Western ways is acted out in jumpy synthesizer rhythms and cautious, carefully monitored lyrics sung by some of the world's most sensuous singers. So-called shaabi music, on the other hand, is a funkier, rootsier reaction by Arab "country" singers to the wayward politics and pitfalls of urban life. The instruments are acoustic and traditional, the lyrics often socially conscious, and the emotions fervent. Relatively untouched by the West, Egyptian music provides a unique sonic entryway into a truly different cultural universe. ---Richard Gehr ... Read more

    Reviews (6)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful
    I love,love,love this CD. I especially like
    Amr Diab's song "Ei Yaani". I'm an Amr Diab fan.
    I highly recomend this CD for anyone who likes Arabic music.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Irresistible party/dance/whirl-around-the-house recording
    A friend gave Yalla to me a few years ago. He heard it in a little combo exotic food/CD store, and bought it immediately. I in turn was on my feet within seconds of putting it on. Someone on epinions said it was just for belly dancers. So untrue! But perhaps that reaction came because you move differently to this hybrid though very Eastern recording than you do to straight Western rock (which I'm more familiar with - and these days, in 2002, so much of music is hybrid anyway). It's much more unpredictable,faster (sometimes frenetic - I usually tire out before the end,as I did a couple of minutes ago, prompting me to sit down and write a review!), sexier. This is one of my all-time favorite recordings, and it belongs on a multi-CD player at a great party. Or, with equal enjoyment, "in the privacy of your home."

    5-0 out of 5 stars An Excellnt Introduction to Shaabi and Al-Jeel!
    I went to great lengths to track down this CD, on recommendations of one of my friends who actually is from Egypt, and let me tell you, it was well worth the time and effort I spent to find it. This CD is an excellent introduction to modern Egyptian pop music, namely Al-Jeel and Shaabi music. The CD is divided into two sections, one dedicated to Al-Jeel, which is a sort of techno-pop style, originating in the '80s, and melding Bedouin, Nubian, Lybian and Egyptian styles into something new, yet uniquely Egyptian. As an admited fan of Al-Jeel music, I was very pleased with the selections, which includes such greats as Amr Diab, Hanan, Ehab and Khedr, though I would have also included Hamid Shaeri, but oh well. C'est la vie. The second set is dedicated to Shaabi, which is the modernized music of the working class people of the cities, often with controversial lyrics. Again, the selections are excellent.
    Both the Al-Jeel and Shaabi selection are broken down into six selections each, so you get pretty good exposure to both. A word of caution though. As one reviewer commented, most of the songs on here are a bit dated. They are still excellent choices, mind you, but there are so many new releases, and new names, that this CD couldn't possibly reveal everything about Egyptian pop. Still, considering how hard it is to get a hold of Egyptian pop music in the United States, this might still be your best introduction. And if your already a fan, why not. Its still an excellent compilation. ... Read more

    Asin: B000003QK6
    Subjects:  1. 80's    2. 90's    3. Afro-Pop    4. Al-Jil    5. Egypt    6. Int'l & World Music    7. Middle East    8. Middle Eastern Pop    9. North Africa    10. Pop    11. Shaabi    12. World    13. Worldbeat   


    The Very Best of Amr Diab
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Audio CD (01 January, 2002)
    list price: $18.49 -- our price: $18.49
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    Features

    • Import
    Reviews (9)

    5-0 out of 5 stars incredible
    amr diab's music/voice is simply incredible. his music as one review put it...goes right through your body.i cannot understand arabic, nor does one have to be middle eastern to really get into this guy's groove of tunes.i am an american who loves music from around the world and amr and his music is so incredible.my favorite...as another review says: it makes you want to know the language...it's so romantic and so cool. you can almost feel what he's singing .. i love this guy!
    keep up the great work amr !

    5-0 out of 5 stars this is great music!!!
    this is a fantastic cd full of fantastic songs. when i listen to these beautiful songs i regret that i can't understand arabic. this cd only could be a reason for anyone to learn arabic and to get to know more about the arabic culture. great music. i send my congratulations to everyone who contributed to these songs in the arab world...

    5-0 out of 5 stars Habibi Amr Diab
    This whole album should be titled "Habibi".The mixture of muscial styles, rythms and sounds are brilliant; so well textured and balanced.Even more magnificant is Amr Diab's melodic voice; it seeps through your skin into your blood.And like me you don't have to be of Arab/Egyptian origin nor understand Arabic to appreciate and marvel decent music. This proves how fantastic this Album really is.I would rate Amr Diab and his music as Egypt's version of "Ricky Martin". ... Read more

    Asin: B00003IR5V
    Sales Rank: 64591
    Subjects:  1. Dance-Pop    2. Egypt    3. Int'l & World Music    4. Middle East    5. Pop    6. World Music   


    $18.49

    La Diva de la Chanson Orientale
    Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars
    Audio CD (14 November, 2000)
    list price: $11.98
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    Features

    • Import
    Reviews (2)

    3-0 out of 5 stars GOOD
    I OWN THE CD AnD I LOVE THE RHYTHM AND THE VOICES THAT ARE ON

    3-0 out of 5 stars GOOD
    I OWN THE CD AnD I LOVE THE RHYTHM AND THE VOICES THAT ARE ON ... Read more

    Asin: B000054253
    Sales Rank: 366691
    Subjects:  1. Arabic    2. Egypt    3. Int'l & World Music    4. Middle East    5. Middle Eastern Pop    6. Pop    7. Traditional Middle Eastern Folk   


    Egypt's Golden Empire
    Director: Ciara Byrne, James Hawes, Richard Bradley (II)
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
    DVD (04 March, 2003)
    list price: $24.98
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    Features

    • Color
    • Closed-captioned
    Reviews (7)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Great documentary
    In preparation for my upcoming trip to Egypt, I rented thirteen different films about ancient and modern Egypt. This particular entry, from PBS, was my favorite. It was informative, well-produced, and did a great job of covering the sweep of New Kingdom history.

    Of all the videos and DVDs I watched, this was the highest quality, and probably the only one I would want to purchase for my own collection.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Misleading in spots
    This is one of the better Egyptian documentaries, if only because it has a (relatively) narrow topic: the New Kingdom.Many Egyptian documentaries simply cover the famous monuments and people of 3,000+ years; in effect, saying very little and bombarding the market with redundant shows.
    There are, however, slight narrative problems with this program.I will highlight one as an example.In part III, which is primarily about Ramses II, the narrative jumps from the death of Tutankhamen to the ascension of Ramses II, presenting a misleading chronology in which it appears that Ramses II actually followed on Tutankhamen.This is hardly the case - four kings came between them (Ay, Horemheb, Ramses I, and Sety I).At the very beginning of Part III, the interviewed scholars note the non-royal background of Ramses.Which Ramses, you ask?That's the problem.Ramses I was in fact non-royal; however, the DVD narrative is actually talking about Ramses II.By the time of the ascension of Ramses II (who was the grandson of Ramses I), Ramses II would actually have been considered royal, since his family had held the throne for three generations by this point (though his family line did not originate as royal blood).Thus, the editing of the DVD has conflated Ramses I, Sety I, and Ramses II, making it seem as though Ramses II began the 19th dynasty directly after Tutankhamen, and completely omitting the last two kings of the 18th dynasty, Ay and Horemheb.
    This is the most blatantly misleading issue in the two-hour program, and I cite it as an illustration of the fact that you cannot view these programs as 100% foolproof academia - much is being omitted from history for the sake of convenience and entertainment value.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Great visuals, but music repeats too often...
    A fascinating look at the Egyptian Empire, but there are certainly better ones out there. Some very nice footage, though often shots are repeated, such as running 'couriers.'

    A serious con for me was the major overuse of the same 'Last of the Mohicans' theme. It was used over, and over again, often, I found distracting from what I was watching. Perhaps because I'm a soundtrack nut though, the music stuck in my head too much. And there were only three or so pieces of music used overall it sounded like. I think I've heard the Gladiator theme used on another documentary like this as well.

    I also found that music was used too often in this documentary. It's important to know when to use music and when not too. Would it have been too much to devote a little more of the budget to getting some different pieces of music created.

    Keith David is a great narrator and takes his time, providing a welcome balance to the overused music.

    Again, good visuals, informative, and the stories are pretty easy to follow, but with a bit of tweaking, this could have been a really great documentary. ... Read more

    Asin: B00007G1YH
    Sales Rank: 30666
    Subjects:  1. Documentary   


    National Geographic Video - Egypt Eternal - The Quest for Lost Tombs
    Director: William Kronick, Jack Kaufman, Bert Haanstra, Irwin Rosten, Terry Sanders, Nicholas Clapp, Nick Cominos, Jeff Myrow, Ed Spiegel (II), Nicolas Noxon
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    DVD (04 March, 2003)
    list price: $19.98 -- our price: $17.98
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Features

    • Color
    • Closed-captioned
    Reviews (1)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Exellent spellbounding adventure!
    This DVD (Digital Video Disc) is exellent with no doubt. It talks about just about everything you can think of for Egypt. If you love geography, like me, this is a must buy. All National Geographic movies are excellent, but this one is over excellent! BUY! BUY! BUY! ... Read more

    Asin: B00007G201
    Sales Rank: 27432
    Subjects:  1. Documentary   


    $17.98

    National Geographic Video - Into the Great Pyramid
    Director: William Kronick, Jack Kaufman, Bert Haanstra, Irwin Rosten, Terry Sanders, Nicholas Clapp, Nick Cominos, Jeff Myrow, Ed Spiegel (II), Nicolas Noxon
    Average Customer Review: 2.0 out of 5 stars
    DVD (04 March, 2003)
    list price: $24.98 -- our price: $22.48
    (price subject to change: see help)
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France

    Features

    • Color
    • Closed-captioned
    Reviews (4)

    1-0 out of 5 stars stayed up late to see another door
    Can't remember too much of this, but was convinced that at the live showing of this on the National geographic channel, that at the end of the show they were going to find something of great importance or something of that nature.Nope, stayed up till two in the morning so they could discover another door.No joke.
    There was other things inbetween the live shots of the mechanical thing going through the tiny tunnel to the next door, but it was late and I don't remember most of it.Sorry!

    1-0 out of 5 stars All Speculation
    This show presents a lot of inaccurate and unsubstantiated information about the great pyramid.

    They drill a hole through a so called 'door' in the pyramid to reach a tremendous archeological discovery: there's a wall behind the 'door'.

    Then they suggest that there are more archeological treasures waiting behind this. So I guess they're planning on drilling another hole into the pyramid to destroy it even more than it already has been.

    Christopher Dunn in his book 'The Giza Power Plant' has discovered the true secret behind the great pyramid.It was a machine.

    There's no evidence that anyone was ever buried inside the great pyramid.

    The current theories about the great pyramid being built to bury someone are not substantiated.It should be obvious that nobody would build something like this just to bury someone.

    Nobody knows how it was even built anyway.The new age psychic Edgar Cayce said the great pyramid was built using anti gravity forces.

    Jeff Marzano

    1-0 out of 5 stars All Speculation
    This Hawass guy who runs the Giza plateau doesn't have any imagination.This is unfortunate because the so called scientific evidence about how the Great Pyramid was built (and probably more importantly why it was built) is flimsy.

    I believe the theory presented by Christopher Dunn in his book The Giza Power Plant. The Great Pyramid was a machine.

    In this show they drilled a hole in a so called 'door' in the pyramid to reveal a great discovery.There's a wall behind the 'door' !

    But is it really just a wall ?It looks like a wall.But to Hawass it's another great archeological discovery.There's some dirt in front of the wall which to Hawass is an indication of another great discovery waiting behind this wall.

    These people should stop damaging the pyramid more than it already has been and start restoring it to its original form.

    The Great Pyramid contains shafts and other mysterious chambers which only make sense when the pyramid is viewed as a machine.

    There's no evidence whatsoever that anyone was ever buried in the Great Pyramid or that it was even intended to be used to bury someone.

    Does it make sense that people would build something like this just to bury someone ?

    Jeff Marzano ... Read more

    Asin: B00007G200
    Sales Rank: 33852
    Subjects:  1. Documentary   


    $22.48

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