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    Atlas of the World (Atlas of the World)
    by Oxford University Press
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (01 October, 2003)
    list price: $80.00
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France
    Reviews (24)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Bigger than you think
    Being the first major atlas purchase I have made, I underestimated the size of the book - of course, paying so much for an atlas, you would think I would expect such a huge slab.The first section is a bunch of beautiful full-page photos of different places on the planet.It is followed by tons of two-page spreads about everything from the universe to climate to various conflicts.It is then followed by maps of various large cities, and finally the detailed maps themselves.The maps can get a little redundant, but the various magnification levels allow you to see an area with different levels of detail.Of course the United States isn't as detailed as an atlas dedicated to the United States, but that's almost to be expected.It can get a little annoying when you're trying to look at an area that falls on the edge of a map and is barely shown on the adjacent map, but overall it is a great resource.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Fine maps, but nothing special about this atlas
    First of all this atlas is a little over 300 pages, not 448 as the book details give (and yes this is the 10th 2002 edition).The maps are well detailed, but my biggest complaint is with the United States maps.They break it down by region, not by individual state, hence one has to flip back on pages to find the half of a state that gets split up.Also with the u.s., county divisions nor their name are included, something one thinks would automatically be in a atlas like this.I paid about $12 for this atlas, which is about the maximum price you should pay, otherwise look around for something better if your going to pay more than that.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Maps and so much more. . . .
    As an avid traveler, I've missed having a good set of world maps, and this book more than met my expectations. The maps are clear, readable and up-to-date. But there's so much more here--the "Images of Earth" from outer space are truly breathtaking. The "Introduction to World Geography" is misnamed. In 50 or so beautifully laid out pages, all the statistical information you'd ever need to know about our world is beautifully laid out in maps, graphs and charts--everything from wealth to health to population to natural resources to climate to migration patterns and more. A gazetteer of nations contains thumbnail descriptions of countries with key facts available at a glance. This is the kind of book a bright child will pour over for hours, and remember forever. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0195219864
    Sales Rank: 62679
    Subjects:  1. Atlases    2. Atlases - General    3. Atlases - World    4. Reference   


    Atlas of World History
    by Patrick K. O'Brien
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (01 October, 1999)
    list price: $85.00 -- our price: $53.55
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Reviews (9)

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Best World History Atlas Book Anywhere
    The Oxford Atlas is the best of all competitors. It is full-size, high quality ink and paper, 368 pages and covers most areas of history from the caveman to the present time. I am not speaking of the concise edition but of the full-size edition. The ISBN number is #0195215672.

    This book covers about 2,000,000 years of history from the origins of humanity to the year 2000. The Atlas is the result of over three years' work by internationally renowned cartographers, an expert editorial team and specialist academic consultants.

    5-0 out of 5 stars I Rate and Compare World History Atlas Books
    As a reader I like to have quick reference books at my finger tips including a new version of the Oxford English Dictionary about 3500 pages long - that I use almost daily. So I decided to add a "history atlas". In the process of doing my research I read the other amazon.com reviewers and then made three trips to two large book stores to actually look at the books and get a better feel for which was the best. I ended up buying the Oxford Atlas of World History. Here are my picks and rankings.

    Listed by My ranking, #1 is the best, #2 is a creative alternative but no substitute.

    1.Atlas of World History, Oxford University Press 2002, 368 pages, $57.80, 13.5" x 10.3" x 1.62" ranked 46,632 on Amazon.com. Hands down winner - professional - good text descriptions, outstanding maps and drawings, covers most things from the cave man forward. Negatives: Big and heavy. If you want to save a few dollars buy the "concise" version.

    2.Creative alternative: The Penguin Atlas of World History, Penguin Books 2004, $11.20, just a paperback sized, just published, 304 pages. Surprisingly impressive, lots of text and pictures mixed together and it is easy to carry around. A nice quick alternative but it will be printed in two volumes.
    .
    3.Timelines of World History, DK Publishing 2002, 666 pages, $27.20. 10.0" x 1.6" ranked 25,800 on Amazon.com. Second with lots of value but in some ways not as comprehensive.

    4. National Geographic Almanac of World History, National Geographic 2003, 384 pages, $28.00, 9.6" x 7.8" x 1.17" ranked 24,426 on Amazon.com. Similar to but less impressive than Oxford books. More text, narrower coverage, fewer maps and drawings.

    5.DK Atlas of World History, DK Publishing, 352 pages, $35.00, 10.96" x 14.66" x 1.28" ranked 10,716 on Amazon.com. My last place book seems like a giant comic book. I love the DK travel books but this seems like one step beyond DK's area of expertise. Superficially it is similar to the Oxford book and it is cheap, and some might like it but it tries to be politically correct and fails.

    6.Oxford Dictionary of World History, Oxford University Press, 704 pages, $7,66, pocketbook sized, sales rank 330,000. Mainly terms, people, and dates but has a few maps also. Limited use but an alternative. I prefer the new Penguin book but this is the best history dictionary to buy.

    Jack in Toronto

    5-0 out of 5 stars The story of humanity from a cartographic perspective
    The affordable price tag of this set of maps paired with its applications to both home and school library patrons will earn it a place on many a home bookshelf as well as libraries: Atlas Of World History, Concise Edition is the result of over three years of intensive effort by a team of academics and editors, and presents the story of humanity from a physical, cartographic perspective. Five parts correspond with the five eras studied by world historians today, making for a particularly accessible set of maps. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0195215672
    Sales Rank: 22286
    Subjects:  1. Atlases - General    2. Atlases - Historical    3. Earth Sciences - Geography    4. Historical Atlases    5. Historical geography    6. Maps    7. Reference   


    $53.55

    Oxford Atlas of Exploration
    by Oxford University Press, Oxford
    Hardcover (01 September, 1997)
    list price: $45.00 -- our price: $45.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Editorial Review

    Humans have always been explorers. Countless millennia ago our distant ancestors were traversing glaciers and negotiating savannas; today we seek the mysteries of the ocean floor, of the mountain summit, and of deepest space. This hefty compendium of exploration lore accounts for all these quests and more, with more than 100 maps and 300 photographs and drawings to liven the discussion. Full of details, The Oxford Atlas of Exploration is a fact-finder's dream. Alexander the Great, we learn, took his army through 20,000 miles of hostile territory; Marco Polo reveled in trout fishing; Lewis and Clark passed their first winter on the Pacific Coast reading by the light of candles made from a beached whale. For history and geography buffs, The Oxford Atlas of Exploration is a must. ... Read more

    Isbn: 019521353X
    Subjects:  1. Atlases    2. Atlases - General    3. Atlases - Historical    4. Discoveries in geography    5. Discovery And Exploration (General)    6. Explorers    7. Historical Atlases    8. History    9. Maps    10. Reference    11. Voyages and travels    12. World - General   


    $45.00

    Encyclopedic World Atlas: A-Z Country-By-Country Coverage (Encyclopedic World Atlas)
    by Oxford University Press
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (01 September, 2000)
    list price: $45.00
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    Editorial Review

    Oxford's Encyclopedic World Atlas is the real thing. Purveyor of information about the known world, it's more than just a bound collection of maps. The amount of data fit on any one page is astonishing, but even more impressive is that the quantity of erudition doesn't interfere with the quality or readability. Some topnotch writing and editing accompanies the fine and legible maps. For instance, on the Mexico page, one learns that the flag is a composite of French tricolor and Aztec symbols; the population doubled between 1960 and 1980; the average Mexican age is 17; and Mexico City, currently holding around 15 million inhabitants, is estimated to be the most populous city in the world by 2000--and that's just how the page begins. With sections on landscape, vegetation, economy, a bar graph for temperature and rainfall, a history of pre-Colombian civilizations, and a detailed, good-sized map, Oxford sets the standard for the genre. --Stephanie Gold ... Read more

    Reviews (4)

    5-0 out of 5 stars I love this atlas!
    It's so easy to use and great for my daughter's book reports. Well worth the money. I think the other reviewer who doesn't like the revision is mistaken.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent pictures & Concise description
    A+ 16K big book. Worth every cent spent.I think every scholoar who is global-minded should have one. I like this atlas so much that I sent this as a gift to my college professors who love it very very much. Every-one will love it and after learning from this book you'll no longer feel surprised to some unknown countries/cities and you'll have a cultural/ historical/geographical perspective toward analyzing some happenings.

    2-0 out of 5 stars A Regretfully Poor Revision
    After owning a number of atlases and eventually giving them all away, I happened upon a second edition of the Oxford Encyclopedic World Atlas. It was nothing short of perfect. It had compiled comparative world data, organized in an informative way and treated each country with a wonderful summary. It was useful and beautiful.

    Therefore when the fifth edition was announced I placed my order. Rarely have I've been so disappointed when expectation sees reality.

    First of all, the wonderful global comparisons of oceans, climate, wealth, energy etc., have been replaced with common continental summaries. Worse though is the fact that these summaries consist only of those incomprehensible theme maps of temperature, precipitation, vegetation and land use. It was because all the rest of the atlases had these useless enigmatic diagrams that I gave them away. I defy anyone to dig any useful information off a January Temperature map. I rather suspect that this information is more readily available and cheaper to obtain making the publication more cost effective for OUP. That it becomes more useless to the reader by the same turn doesn't seem to matter.

    The country summaries have been ordered a-z as opposed by continent. This certainly makes it easier to find them but renders them out of any context whatsoever. But even here the work is substandard. For instance in the summary of Argentina, the section on the Economy ends with "...which are heavily" One wonders - heavily what? Sloppy.

    Why UOP would take such a solid franchise and ruin it through conscience manipulation and sloppy design and editing is beyond me.

    For the killing of truly useful tome OUP should not receive even one star, but I will give it two. The first is for the editions that bravely preceded this one. And the second is for my hope for the sixth edition. In the meantime I strongly recommend that the staff at OUP convene at the pub for it is apparent that their office decisions regarding the Oxford Encyclopedic World Atlas are abysmal. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0195215893
    Subjects:  1. Atlases - General    2. Atlases - World    3. Encyclopedias    4. Reference   


    National Geographic Atlas Of The World 7th Edition
    by National Geographic
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (01 November, 1999)
    list price: $150.00
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    Editorial Review

    When National Geographic published its first Atlas of the World more than 35 years ago, the world was indeed a different place. In order to cover today's world--including its oceans, stars, climate, natural resources, and more--National Geographic has published its seventh edition of the Atlas of the World. With each new edition, National Geographic strives to make its atlas more than just maps. You'll learn that the coldest place in the world is the Plateau Station in Antarctica, where the average daily temperature is minus 56.7 degrees Celsius; the most populated continent is Asia, with more than 3.6 billion people, or 60.8 percent of the world's population; the driest place on earth is the Atacama Desert in Chile; a flight from New Delhi to Rio de Janeiro covers 14,080 kilometers; life expectancy in the Republic of Zambia is 37 years; and the literacy rate in Turkmenistan is 98 percent.

    Flip through the pages of this impressive book and you will feel as though the world is literally at your fingertips. Full-page spreads are devoted to more than 75 political and physical maps (political maps show borders; physical maps show mountains, water, valleys, and vegetation). There are many new touches to be found in this edition, including increased usage of satellite images, an especially helpful feature when researching the most remote regions of the earth; more than 50 updated political maps that record the impact of wars, revolutions, treaties, elections, and other events; and the use of the latest research on topics such as tectonics, oceanography, climate, and natural resources. The sheer size of the atlas's index--134 pages--offers insight into just how much information is packed into 260-plus pages. The book is so physically large, in fact, that when it's open, the reader is staring at three square feet of information, a surface area larger than many television screens. The potential uses of this book for a family are vast, from settling a friendly argument to completing a school report. In the end, though, the atlas is still mostly about maps. Pages and pages of maps. Maps that force us to see how wonderful and dynamic our world is. Maps that remind us of where we've been and where we'd still like to go. --John Russell ... Read more

    Reviews (26)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Incredible Family Resource
    I've had the new atlas for 60 days and find myself looking something up every 2-3 days. It's really been fun looking up remote places like Palmyra Atoll, Kerguelen Island, the Fly River and other obscure places I read about.

    And now I've found an interesting use for the password protected online atlas as well. The online Atlas gives you high-resolution access to all the Atlas map plates. You can print, copy or email maps or portions of maps. I expect the online Atlas to come in handy for school projects.

    If you've read through the reviews you'll know the Iranians are upset about the "renaming" of the Persian Gulf. OK, since I'm at work, I'll log in to the password protected Atlas website, pull up Plate 75 and take a look. The Persian Gulf is labeled "Persian Gulf" but underneath it in parentheses is the label "Arabian Gulf". Apparently "Arabian Gulf", even in parentheses, is an affront to Iranian pride.

    I want to be fair on this so I decided to check out some other atlases at my local bookstore to see how they handle the Gulf label. Most of the atlases use the term Persian Gulf by itself, but several prominent, highly-rated Atlases use the label "The Gulf" with no Persian or Arabian modifier, so there is legitimate debate in the cartographic world about how to refer to this body of water. For nationalistic reasons the Iranians want it only to be called the Persian Gulf, but I suspect the other countries bordering the Gulf would disagree. Most people will continue to call it the Persian Gulf, and the NGS Atlas appropriately uses that name as the primary label.

    However, Iran does not own the Persian Gulf, and if a different name is now used by millions of people, then you have to admire the NGS for including both labels and not bowing to pressure from any political group, unlike the Atlases that meekly call it "The Gulf". I sympathize with the Iranian's anger over what they perceive to be psychological warfare by the Arabs, but I would still prefer to know if an alternate name is in use locally, and that is what the NGS atlas provides. Geographic names evolve, and the NGS continues its strong history of providing up-to-date cartography.

    The new NGS World Atlas is among the top two or three World Atlases available, and the discounted price from Amazon makes it a relative bargain, especially when you consider you also get an online Atlas that mirrors the printed edition.

    I for one feel the maps in the NGS World Atlas are as accurate and beautiful as you will find anywhere and now they're available online as well. This is a great family resource.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Fantastic, but doesn't live up to all advertisements
    With a limited number of printings and a three-digit price, you expect great things from National Geographic's Altas of the World. And, for the most part, the book delivers. In lieu of a long review, I though I'd just come up with some pros and cons to explain why I gave the book the rating I did.

    Pros: amazing quality of pictures/maps, city maps, intresting nation and political information, wealth of information, built-in bookmark.

    Cons: not 400 pages like amazon claims (137 pages sans index), index is almost as long as rest of book, will not fit in any bookcase you own, poor binding for such an expensive book, hard to fit back in cover.

    The last atlas I owned was a child's atlas from 1987. I bought the National Geographic version because I took it to be the diffinitive atlas. And it is. I'm happy with the 8th edition and I'm sure it will be a usefull reference for years to come. But given how few pages it is and how much money it cost, I'm not sure I would buy the 9th edition.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Best general atlas
    I have both the 7th and 8th editions of this book, as well as recent editions of most of the other major world atlases.

    In my opinion, this latest (8th) edition blows away the competition (_and_ the National Geographic's own 7th edition).

    Having bought and owned world atlases for almost 50 years, I strongly recommend this atlas for home, school, or library use. I find this latest edition exceedingly accurate, especially in the areas of the Middle East (*despite* the protestations from certain _very_ organized political factions <ahem>).

    Magnificent satellite photos, along with revised and improved political and geo-physical maps, set this one apart from the rest. Much of the "supplemental" map sections of the previous edition are expanded.

    Regarding the reviewer who indicated that the 7th edition is "cloth-bound":well, the 7th edition (that I own) actually has a *cloth-textured* dark blue *paper* overlay on hardboard. The internal hinges are "binders' mull" (cloth) _but_ so are those of the plastic-coated covers of the 8th edition! Both editions should hold up very well. The main difference in the covers is the aesthetics, and the 8th edition is indeed quite pleasing in that department.

    I most highly recommend the 8th edition of this atlas, and you certainly won't go wrong if you purchase it from Amazon.
    A great addition to the panoply of atlases, and a huge treat for addictive map lovers! ... Read more

    Isbn: 0792275284
    Subjects:  1. Atlases    2. Atlases - General    3. Atlases - World    4. Earth Sciences - Geography    5. Reference    6. Reference / General   


    National Geographic Atlas Of World History
    by Noel Grove
    Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (01 August, 1998)
    list price: $40.00 -- our price: $40.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France
    Reviews (7)

    1-0 out of 5 stars Horrible mistake in regards to PERSIAN GOLF ****************
    What the hell is going on... I wonder wich rich royal family in the mid-east has funded this unbeleivable mistake!!!

    For your info, The Persian golf has existed for thousands of years up until your 2004 Edition.

    What happened ???Are you taking advantage of the last moments in mullah history before they are overthrown to clinch a deal with the Arabs ?????

    I am really disapointed, and did not think that a non-for profit organisation like yours would do such a mistake.

    RECALLL All Copies or Face Legal Actions.

    Sam
    Vancouver Canada

    1-0 out of 5 stars Historical information in this book was manipulated
    In this book, unfortunately due to powerful anti-Iranian (Persian) activities and the typical incompetence of the Islamic Republic that occupies Iran, the southern states of the Persian Gulf who have only come to existence thanks to foreign powers, have slowly become more brazen. As a result the National Geographic Society has printed at least three major erroneous statements in its Atlas of the World 2005 (Eighth Edition, ISBN: 0-7922-7543-8 & ISBN: 0-7922-7542-x) regarding Iran and the Persian Gulf.

    Considering the fact that the National, Geographic is the biggest non-profit educational and scientific institution, it is hard for us to fathom how they made reference to the Persian Gulf with an unrecognized name. The United Nations, in addition to historical records and facts that date back more than thousands of years, have made it abundantly clear that the body of water in question is recognized as the Persian Gulf.

    The atlas also falsely claims that several Persian Gulf Islands belong to the newly created United Arab Emirates. It would appear that the National Geographic Society has joined hands with the enemies of Iran, and is now openly helping those who seek to compromise Iran's territorial integrity. Perhaps the National Geographic Society should look back on it's own maps to see that 33 years ago no entity by the name of United Arab Emirates existed, however Iran did. Furthermore, the National Geographic itself had previously always used the formal, and legitimate name, the Persian Gulf to reference the body of water in question. The National Geographic's stance encourages conflict in an area which has experiences relative calm with the use of the official and internationally recognized name of the Persian Gulf for centuries. Iran (Persia) has existed for more then seven thousand years, and to now have a publication attempt to strip it of its historical territory will not be tolerated.

    The Atlas goes further to claim that the Persian Gulf Islands are being occupied by Iran. If anything is being occupied, it would be various parts of Iran (Persia) that have been taken from us through illegal means starting 33 years ago.

    We condemn the policies of the National Geographic that have made it possible for such illegitimate maps to be published. We look to hear from the National Geographic regarding the blunders they have made on their 2005 Atlas, and urge them to correct these errors, and to apologize to the nation of Iran (Persia) for damaging our national culture and heritage in addition to our territorial integrity.

    The enemies of Iran should know, so long as there is one Iranian (Persian) alive with blood pumping through his or her heart, even the thought of taking one grain of Iranian (Persian) soil, will strongly be opposed and defeated.

    As a result, the historical information in this book was manipulated.

    D. Javidan

    4-0 out of 5 stars Fine history tome but not really an atlas....
    I give this book four stars because, while it is really not an atlas, it is a wonderful overview of history.

    The book features the superb photography/illustrations that folks expect from National Geographic. These graphics are used to good effect, showing the progression from early history to the late 1990's. I find it a most enjoyable "refresher course" in world history. There is a timeline at the top of each page indicating significant events for the given period.

    If you wish to have a succinct world history summary/review with great aesthetics, you can't go wrong with this. However, it offers relatively few maps (around 60 or so), so don't depend on it as a true atlas. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0792270487
    Sales Rank: 213942
    Subjects:  1. Atlases    2. Atlases - Historical    3. History    4. History - General History    5. Reference    6. World - General    7. World history    8. Reference / General   


    $40.00

    National Geographic Expeditions Atlas
    by National Geographic Society
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (01 June, 2000)
    list price: $40.00 -- our price: $26.40
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Editorial Review

    No matter where you go, someone had to be there first. The National Geographic Expeditions Atlas looks at more than 100 years of National Geographic Society-funded or -chronicled explorations to the poles, undersea, skyward, and into our past. Though it contains plenty of maps from many eras covering small and large scales, the book is more a beautifully illustrated travelogue of adventure than an atlas proper; few will complain, however. The photography is transcendent, skimming the very best of National Geographic's deservedly respected work to reveal the depths of ice caves, the heights of Everest, never-before-recorded ruins, and hundreds of exhausted explorers. Even the most thoroughgoing stay-at-homes will find themselves pining for the fjords as they read the exploits of the daredevils and scientists who roam the frontiers or create new ones. The writing is subdued, but it pays careful attention to details, humanizing the men and women involved and bringing their day-to-day struggles to vibrant life. Jacques Cousteau, Theodore Roosevelt, Louis and Mary Leakey, Amelia Earhart, Jane Goodall, and John Glenn are some of the famous names on the roster of National Geographic explorers--and the introductory timeline highlights an encouraging trend toward more and more adventurers and expeditions as the years advance. The more you read, the more tempted you'll be to join them yourself.--Rob Lightner ... Read more

    Reviews (1)

    4-0 out of 5 stars A Timeless Atlas!
    This is a great addition to your adventure books library!People have been seeking adventure since the beginning of time and there is still much to be discovered.This book is a great sampling of those adventurers bothpast and present who dared to venture beyond traditional boundaries and whohavebrought us a better understanding of this phenomenal world we livein.I plan on giving this book as gifts to my adventure-seeking friends! ... Read more

    Isbn: 0792276167
    Subjects:  1. Atlases - General    2. Discovery And Exploration (General)    3. General    4. Historical Atlases    5. History    6. History: World    7. Modern - 20th Century    8. Reference    9. Reference - General    10. Voyages and travels    11. History / General   


    $26.40

    The National Geographic Desk Reference
    by National Geographic Society
    Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (15 November, 1999)
    list price: $40.00
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    Editorial Review

    Geographers, natural scientists, sociologists, environmentalists, explorers (both armchair and ambulant), and cartographers, take note: National Geographic has put out a desk reference, and it's a beaut. The mere heft of it (3.75 lbs.) is inspiring, and the contents more than live up to National Geographic's reputation for quality.

    It was written by five professors with Ph.D.s in geography and geology, natural sciences, and urban studies, and the text adheres to rigorous scholarly standards, nonetheless speaking to a broad audience. In other words, there's much to by gained by professionals, but it's accessible to those who routinely nodded off during high school earth science, too. The Desk Reference is organized into four parts. "What Is Geography?" takes a look at the history of geography and the history of maps and globes, forming Part I. Part II, "Physical Geography," delves into the structure, composition, formation, dimensions, and tilt of Planet Earth, followed by a lucid discussion of weather, climate patterns, geology, and bioregions. Next comes Part III, "Human Geography," which examines the population, migration, culture, politics, economy, and society throughout the world. And finally there is Part IV, "Places," with 216 pages devoted to summarizing the nations of the world from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe, providing relevant statistics and notes on each country's economy, government, transportation, and communications. And these country sketches are followed by 11 superb maps, as well as a glossary.

    In a time of change that's affecting our climates and populations, environments and national borders, National Geographic's Desk Reference is a welcome source of information, analysis, and perspective. --Stephanie Gold ... Read more

    Reviews (4)

    1-0 out of 5 stars Too often just "Bad Geography"!
    As a long standing member of the NGS I was frankly shocked at the poor quality of the information in this book. One would hope for accuracy from an organisation which claims to be promoting improved understanding of geography - but this book is riddled with unacceptable errors. Here are a few!
    a. Page 660 "Gibraltar, an island in the Strait of Gibraltar". Really?
    b. Page 442. Apparently Chongqing, several thousand kilometers inland on the Yangtse, is at risk from a tsunami (whereas China's seaboard cities are not!
    c. Page 625. I am expected to believe that little Sao Tome (population around 150000) had 5 million visitors in 1994 - but that these only spent US$2 million (40c each!)
    d. Pages 12/13. The NGS has always apparently been totally incapable of understanding the difference between "United Kingdom", "Britain" and "England"/"Scotland" etc. Similarly with the nationalities involved. Thus, totally randomly, in this section explorers are shown as coming from, inter alia "England", "Scotland", "Britain". Why for instance are Speke/Grant from "Britain" whilst Samuel and Florence Baker are from "England". Shackleton is shown as coming from "England" when he was in fact Anglo Irish. etc etc!
    e. Page 457. The UK territory of St Helena is not mentioned in the "Dependencies list" - nor Tristan Da Cunha
    f. Page 306. Why is Bhutan shown in this map as "Hindu". Whilst it has a Hindu minority one of the most noteworthy aspects of Bhutanese culture is its adherence to Buddhism.

    You might think that these are "nit picking" criticisms across c700pp. Ok if you don't mind a "Reference book" which might get things wrong then buy it!

    4-0 out of 5 stars If this is what you want, then this is it.
    True, if you are looking for detail factoids about each country in the world (per complaint in prior review) then this is not the best product out there, I'd go to Countries of the World and Their Leaders Yearbook or Worldmark Encyclopedia of the Nations or the online CIA World Factbook.Instead, this is more an encyclopedia of the discipline of geography, from Eratosthenes to the European Union.The first three sections, "What is Geography?", "Physical Geography", and "Human Geography" covertheories and processes like a mini textbook.Consider it a grown-up version of Kenneth Davis' Don't Know Much About Geography.Only the last section contains information about individual countries, coveringeach nation's physical geography, government, economy, culture, etc.Being more of a human or social geographer, I find the sections on physical geography topics to be very handy on such topics as plate tectonics, soils, and groundwater.Why only 4 stars?Like many 'desk references' it has perhaps an identity crisis.Is it a dictionary?An encyclopedia?A directory or a textbook?A little of all rolled into one.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Ultimate Addition to your National Geographic Library
    A National Geographic Book that puts it all together. I have read many college level geography textbooks, and this book has all the information in a much more readable form. The maps and diagrams in this book are great, but if you are looking for a National Geographic Picture Book, buysomething else. I have enjoyed reading through this book. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0792270827
    Subjects:  1. Atlases - World    2. Earth Sciences - Geography    3. General    4. Geography    5. Geography (General)    6. Handbooks, manuals, etc    7. Reference    8. Reference - General    9. Science    10. Reference / General   


    National Geographic Satellite Atlas Of The World
    by Unknown Unknown
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (01 November, 1998)
    list price: $50.00
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    Reviews (7)

    5-0 out of 5 stars What in the world?
    As a child, I was always fascinated by maps, and fascinated by astronomy.In many ways, this book combines those fascinations in one truly remarkable text.Every page is a full-colour plate, showing satellite-produced images of the entire world in multiple respects.

    The organisation of the book is basic, as any other atlas; the major sections include the World, North America, South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia/New Zealand, and Antarctica.In addition to these major sections, there are shorter pieces on satellites (both history of satellites and how satellites work), the future, and credits/index sections.

    This is no simple book of maps.There are typical geopolitical maps, to be sure, as apart from the basic outlines, it is sometimes hard to tell what is being shown in the photographs.However, pride of place certainly belongs to the photographs, from both the visible light spectrum and non-visible (ultra-high and -low) spectrums.These show geological topography, physical features, vegetation, climate, oceans, population, constructed/built-up features, and more.

    With regard to the oceans, there are different types of satellite images which show temperature variations, depth, underwater vegetation, geological fault lines, and even pollution.There is a fascinating section showing the seasonal variations of ocean temperature and motion due to El Nino effects.

    Similarly, with population and developed areas, it is mesmerising to see the differences and similarities across the various continents.Cities look very much the same in many respects from space in the distant view; the dominant characteristics at ranges that cover tens of miles is often the contours and geological/natural formations that surround a city.However, when close-up ranges are shown, the human constructions become apparent, and the cities show their unique characters based on the population in connection with their environments.One particularly fun photograph is a composition photograph showing the lights at night around the world.This particular map shows dense population around cities, particularly coastal cities; however, this can be deceptive, as the more highly populated country of India puts out less light at night than the lesser populated but more technologically advanced North America and Europe.

    This is a wonderful way to look at the world, to see the kinds of things that a traditional map with boundaries and countries would not show.Done with the quality photography and explanation that is the hallmark of National Geographic, this large-format book would look at home equally on the shelf of a student of any age as well as the coffee table of a well-appointed home.

    5-0 out of 5 stars One of a Kind
    Satellite photos let us see the lands as they really look like.However, the coloring of the pictures may be artificial or real, depending on whether they have been tempered with.Artficial coloring is sometimes done deliberately (like for the purpose of contrast), of course.

    This atlas is too short.We can use far more detailed photographs.For instance, California alone requires a whole chapter unto itself.Also, it's been five years since publication, and far more powerful satellites are now being used for cartography.

    Still, this book is a good start, and the quality is excellent.For those of us who aren't planning wars, we don't need photos of the Predator or the Global Hawk quality.This will do.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Beautiful, Informative
    Shows the world in all its glory. Get a full color birdseye of pollution, urbanization, natural/industrial disasters, and many amazing natural phenomena.

    Really excellent. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0792272161
    Sales Rank: 338032
    Subjects:  1. Atlases    2. Atlases - General    3. Atlases - World    4. Earth    5. Reference    6. Remote-sensing images    7. Reference / General   


    The Great World Atlas (Great World Atlas)
    by Andrew Heritage
    Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (01 October, 2002)
    list price: $100.00
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    Reviews (3)

    1-0 out of 5 stars Atlas with a huge crack
    This atlas is a major disappointment.I received it as a gift and was very excited to start avidly pouring over the satelite images and maps.I have enjoyed other books by this publisher.Not only is this atlas unwieldy (many of the maps require that this huge book be turned sideways to properly view) but the crack down the center swallows up big chunks of the image, rendering the cartography all but useless.It seems that with a little advance planning and forethought the maps could have been oriented in such a way so that the information was legible.I guess I will attach legs and use it as a 'book coffee table.'

    5-0 out of 5 stars Best ever map, barring none
    I thought the National Geographic World map was pretty good, until I boght the DK version. As with almost everything DK, it is simply the best. The information is complete, well presentes and easy to follow. Don't let this book's massive size put you off. It is worth every penny and more.

    5-0 out of 5 stars the geology nerd's first choice
    If you're looking to find a specific small town in Europe or Africa, the Times Atlas is better because more of its pages are devoted to road maps and the maps are more cluttered.This DK atlas devotes many of its pages to physical geography, inset explanations of interesting phenomena (e.g., Niagara Falls), and satellite photos.The night-time satellite photos are very useful because they show population density.The Great World Atlas is nice for planning trips, figuring out whether a potential vacation spot is near interesting geographical features such as a group of hills, and thinking about regions of the world.

    This book would make a fabulous gift because of its lavish printing. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0789489317
    Sales Rank: 355804
    Subjects:  1. Atlases    2. Atlases - General    3. Maps    4. Reference   


    DK World Atlas: Second Edition
    by Andrew Heritage
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (01 September, 2000)
    list price: $50.00 -- our price: $50.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France

    Editorial Review

    Even though the world is rapidly changing borders and political alliances, the Dorling Kindersley World Atlas has kept up admirably. Modified since its original publication in 1997, the atlas documents the physical terrain, societal and economic shifts, and political moods and boundaries of the entire world (really, the entire world, from vast Asia to tiny Micronesia).

    The Dorling Kindersley World Atlas is large, heavy, and fascinating.It begins with a section on "The World Today," which encompasses the solar system, the structure of the Earth, the oceans, the global climate, and international boundaries and disputes. Then it focuses on the continents, each broken down by country and/or region. Finally, the atlas concludes with an impressive index-gazetteer that tracks all 80,000 geographical names mentioned in the book and includes a breakdown of the pertinent information (population, date of independence, industry, languages, ethnic mix, etc.) of every country. There are so many interesting bits of information, it would be easy to get lost in Africa or New Zealand for hours.

    The computer-generated maps, models, and illustrations are incredibly realistic and brilliantly colored. Interspersed with photos illustrating cities, villages, and natural wonders, there are population grids and industry markers. As much as possible, land masses are shown curved, giving a more accurate perspective of the true tilt of the Earth. Perusing the Dorling Kindersley World Atlas is absorbing and entertaining--you'll learn more about the Arabian Peninsula or the Solomon Islands than you ever thought you could. A wonderful educational tool and conversation starter for families. --Dana Van Nest ... Read more

    Reviews (12)

    5-0 out of 5 stars You can't go wrong for the price
    Anyone looking to own an exceptional atlas for under $50 will not go wrong buying this atlas. DK is the master of visullay stunning cartography on paper. The physical features come to life on the pages of this atlas, and beckon to be explored. A unique feature that I enjoy is that just regions are shown in the map sections. For example, if you want to look at the map of Germany, you get a two-page spread of just Germany...very innovative. The amount of physical, political and cultural geography included in this atlas is outstanding. I love geography and this atlas has all the information I need. Did I mention the cartography is stunning?

    1-0 out of 5 stars There is no 0 *
    I wanted to look inside the book and found that there are 98 indices. Is this some kind of joke? Out of 128 there are a very few pages for review. In fact there is nothing to review. If the snapshots are real, then this book should never be bought.
    I Wanted to buy an cheaper world atlas for quick reference, it seems there is none. I am aware of the expensive ones though.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A brief comment
    As others have already written very complete reviews of this fine atlas, I just had a brief comment or two. Like DK's other books, this atlas is notable for DK's facility for innovative and attractive graphical design. One thing they do that nobody else does is to angle the maps at different orientations, which sometimes looks odd, as they stretch across the two-page spreads of the book, so that the many illustrations and paragraphs of text will fit. This makes it possible to cram a lot more material on a given page and makes the DK atlas the busiest and densest looking of all the big atlases out there, which can sometimes get a little distracting. But it also allows them to impart a lot of information and include many other graphics that might not otherwise fit. I didn't mind this really and give them credit for being creative here.

    I also compared this book with the even bigger and truly gargantuan DK Millenium Atlas, but which is more than twice the price. The main difference seemed to be the latter book's inclusion of cloud-free satellite photos along with the traditional geographical maps of each region, making it possible to correlate real photos of the earth with the more standard maps, an interesting feature and contribution, but as I said, it's more than twice the price of the present volume. Both are superb atlases, however, and whichever one you pick, they are great books for teaching, learning, or just to browse through for the fun of it. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0789459620
    Subjects:  1. Atlases    2. Atlases - General    3. Atlases - World    4. Earth Sciences - Geography    5. Reference    6. Science    7. Science/Mathematics   


    $50.00

    DK Atlas of World History
    by Jeremy Black
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (01 April, 2000)
    list price: $50.00 -- our price: $31.50
    (price subject to change: see help)
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France
    Reviews (10)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Making History a Journey
    The DK World History Atlas brings the DK uniformity of style and lots of helpful illustrations to something that's more than a collection of maps.I really use this book frequently and find it well-organized and indexed.The companion to this book is the DK Timelines of History.The only complaint is one that another reviewer raised.The 20th century is short-changed given the density of boundary-moving events.

    3-0 out of 5 stars I Rate and Compare World History Atlas Books
    As a reader I like to have quick reference books at my finger tips including a new version of the Oxford English Dictionary about 3500 pages long - that I use almost daily. So I decided to add a "history atlas". In the process of doing my research I read the other amazon.com reviewers and then made three trips to two large book stores to actually look at the books and get a better feel for which was the best. I ended up buying the Oxford Atlas of World History. Here are my picks and rankings.

    Listed by My ranking, #1 is the best, #2 is a creative alternative but no substitute.

    1.Atlas of World History, Oxford University Press 2002, 368 pages, $57.80, 13.5" x 10.3" x 1.62" ranked 46,632 on Amazon.com. Hands down winner - professional - good text descriptions, outstanding maps and drawings, covers most things from the cave man forward. Negatives: Big and heavy. If you want to save a few dollars buy the "concise" version.

    2.Creative alternative: The Penguin Atlas of World History, Penguin Books 2004, $11.20, just a paperback sized, just published, 304 pages. Surprisingly impressive, lots of text and pictures mixed together and it is easy to carry around. A nice quick alternative but it will be printed in two volumes.
    .
    3.Timelines of World History, DK Publishing 2002, 666 pages, $27.20. 10.0" x 1.6" ranked 25,800 on Amazon.com. Second with lots of value but in some ways not as comprehensive.

    4. National Geographic Almanac of World History, National Geographic 2003, 384 pages, $28.00, 9.6" x 7.8" x 1.17" ranked 24,426 on Amazon.com. Similar to but less impressive than Oxford books. More text, narrower coverage, fewer maps and drawings.

    5.DK Atlas of World History, DK Publishing, 352 pages, $35.00, 10.96" x 14.66" x 1.28" ranked 10,716 on Amazon.com. My 4th or 5th place book seems like a giant comic book. I love the DK travel books but this seems like one step beyond DK's area of expertise. Superficially it is similar to the Oxford book and it is cheaper to buy, and some might like it but it tries to be politically correct and fails.

    6.Oxford Dictionary of World History, Oxford University Press, 704 pages, $7,66, pocketbook sized, sales rank 330,000. Mainly terms, people, and dates but has a few maps also. Limited use but an alternative. I prefer the new Penguin book but this is the best history dictionary to buy.

    Jack in Toronto

    2-0 out of 5 stars The most politically correct atlas of world history
    The DKAtlas of World History: Mapping the Human Journey is a huge top shelf book. It is divided into two parts: the first gives the reader a global view of history divided into different eras(e.g.the advent of agriculture, trade and first cities, the age of the crusades,etc.), the second describes regional history (North America, South America, Africa, Europe,West Asia, South and South East Asia, Noth and East Asia, Oceania, the Arctic and Antarctica).In both parts you will find numerous time lines with the important dates, small color illustrations and short paragraphs about the events covered.At the end of the book there is a subject index and glossary and an index with all the place names shown on the maps.Finally there is a two page bibliography.

    There is no question that this is a very beautiful book with pleasant pastel colors, pleasant, glossy paper and maps of different sizes and seen under different angles, which avoids monotony.

    Having said that, it is also clear for an attentive reader that the editor has been at pains to be absolutely politically correct, which means:
    -ostentatious use of BCE and CE instead of AD and BC
    -gross neglect of Christianity: whereas the spread of Islam is worth a double page with big maps in both sections of the Atlas, there is not a single chapter or map about the spread or history of Christianity, which is amazing, considering its importance for the "human journey". In the index, Jesus is nonchalantly called "the inspiration of the Christian religion" (is it an abstract character, one wonders), crucified as a "troublemaker in 29 CE". Strangely enough, Buddha and Muhammad are called "founders" of their respective religions, which is quite true but why deny the title to Christ?
    The entry for "Christianity" is also enlightening: here we are told that the early Christian faith, which is decribed as an "offshoot of Judaism", split from the very beginning into "many sects". Never mind the same happened to Islam, there is no mention of any heresies or infighting inside that religion at the corresponding entry.
    I also could not find a single time line showing the birth or death of Jesus and other great Christians like Paul and Peter.
    -neglect of European history: although European history is the best documented, in this atlas it is treated on the same level as Africa or Australia, which means that at least a dozen chapters and scores of maps are missing for the serious student of history.

    Being anti-Christian and anti-European are, as some have rightly said, the last acceptable prejudices. ... Read more

    Isbn: 078944609X
    Sales Rank: 8110
    Subjects:  1. Atlases    2. Atlases - General    3. Atlases - Historical    4. Historical atlases    5. Historical geography    6. Maps    7. Reference    8. Reference / General   


    $31.50

    World Desk Reference
    by Financial Times
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 January, 2002)
    list price: $29.95
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    Editorial Review

    Set aside a little extra time when you're looking up information from the DK World Desk Reference--you won't be able to keep yourself from browsing. The large, gorgeous pages are colorful and well designed, and while the facts you need are readily available, their neighbors are clamoring for your attention, too. Beginning with a set of physical, historical, and economic maps of the world and its continents, the Desk Reference quickly gets to its heart: several pages devoted to each nation of the world (as of the year 2000), from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe. Clear, detailed maps, synopses of political, economic, environmental, historical, and demographic information, and exquisitely helpful charts bring each country to life and serve as a brief but thorough lesson on its place in the world. The four-page spread on Yugoslavia will help you understand the situation there better and faster than a pile of history textbooks, and your awareness of the importance of groups such as the G7, WTO, and IMF will expand tremendously after just a few minutes of browsing. Despite its entertainment and educational value, though, the DK World Desk Reference is also a sharply focused reference tool: The index and gazetteer will bring you to the right page without fail time and again.--Rob Lightner ... Read more

    Reviews (8)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Beyond Cartography
    This book presents a complete overview of the world. The physical, political, historical and economic details are covered in detail. Each of the world's nations are mapped in detail. There is a guide to 20,000 of the world's important places along with recent name changes.

    With more than 5,000 illustrations, charts and diagrams, 600 maps and 25,000 facts and statistics this has to be the world's best book about the world.

    You will learn about:

    The Physical World
    The Political World

    The Continents
    The World Economy, Population and International Organizations.
    Time Zones
    Chronology of World Historoy
    The Formation of the Modern World
    The Solar System

    To say this is comprehensive would be an understatement.

    The colors and pictures are stunning. The pages are easy to read and this has a high visual appeal.

    The first part of the book has wonderful maps of the world and what was known at the time and what was going on in the world at the time.

    In the section about "The Nations of the World" you will find specific information about climate, people, transportation, tourism, politics, defense, economics, resources, environment, media, crime, education, health, spending and world ranking. This huge section takes up most of the book. The Index is well organized and extensive.

    A must have for any teacher or library.(...)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Good little bookykins...
    Really it's quite big and very good. It contains 3 sections, section 1, maps, more like an atlas, a map on the world on every page. Section 2 - Factfiles for every country in the world, including Dependencies and territories such as Antarctica. Section 2 also contains the date of independence, which years borders were eastablished, the country's national day, the vehicle registration plate, crime, transportation and many many more. Section 3 is a very useful gazetteer plus a great nearly over an a hundred paged index.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The World in a Nutshell!
    I love this book!Clearly-presented charts, maps, histories and statistics on every nation in the world--a gold-mine of facts.Colorful graphics and text, in the trademark "DK" style, highlight data on:climate, transportation, tourism, people, politics, world affairs, foreign aid, defense, economics, resources, environment, media, crime, education, health, spending, GNP, life expectancy, literacy, infant mortality rates . . . whew!As one with a zealous interest in politics, geography, economics and world affairs, I'm sure I'll be opening this book quite often.Perhaps my favorite feature is the "chronology" presented for each country, listing important dates and events in that particular country's history.I also like the pie charts summarizing the religious persuasion and ethnic makeup of each country.For those looking for a clear, concise, yet thorough volume of world facts, this is a great choice! ... Read more

    Isbn: 0789483564
    Subjects:  1. Atlases - General    2. Encyclopedias    3. Encyclopedias and dictionaries    4. Maps    5. Reference    6. Yearbooks & Annuals   


    The Great Atlas of the Stars
    by Serge Brunier, Akira Fujii
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Spiral-bound (01 October, 2001)
    list price: $49.95 -- our price: $32.97
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Reviews (10)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Amazing
    I have this book, and its heping me with my studies and night watching. This book, has a really amazing way to explain, to view and to make a sence for you while watching the heveans, espacially for the beginners!

    4-0 out of 5 stars "Great Atlas" falls short of its name
    One knock on modern star atlases is that they tend to be, well, a little dry.Old atlases have colorful constellation figures drawn in ornate detail, detail that gets in the way of seeing the actual stars.Aiming for the practical, atlases for professional use focused more and more on the stars--the ultimate case being an atlas by the German astronomer Friedrich Argelander.Argelander's work was a map of 324,000 stars, unrelieved with figures, constellation lines, names, numbers, or indeed anything at all except coordinate lines.It's hardly a gripping book.

    Brunier and Fujii's book is an attempt to put more of the beauty of the night sky back into a map of the stars.This book really isn't a comprehensive atlas; think of it more as a Fodor's guide to the stars.Not all of the sky is covered--just the highlights.

    Even those readers only faintly acquainted with the heavens will recognize some friends here: the Big Dipper, Orion.But this book doesn't merely show you the constellations.Akira Fujii's breathtaking wide-field astrophotos reveal dozens of celestial wonders in the neighborhood of each constellation.The brightest are pulled out for special mention in the accompanying text, written by Brunier.Acetate overlays are cleverly inserted between the photos, marked with white circles to indicate where the objects are.

    Here's where the book gets a bit dicier.Quite a few of the circles aren't where they ought to be.The circles for M81 and M82, a dazzling pair of galaxies close to the Big Dipper, is a couple of degrees off from where it ought to be.(The circle itself is about a degree across.)Even worse is the circle for M3, a globular cluster containing hundreds of thousands of stars; not only is the circle about 5 degrees off, but M3 isn't even in the wide-field astrophoto at all.

    Now, an ordinary copy editor isn't going to be able to catch this, and it won't matter much to the ordinary reader.But it shows a lack of attention to detail that just shouldn't be an issue for a book with such outstanding production values.(And they are outstanding.)This book deserves a second edition; let's hope that these mostly minor issues get resolved by then.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful book, useful, attractive, and even educational
    I have a number of astronomy books and this one stands out as exceptional.Its a well annotated picture book that appeals to both adults and youngsters.It serves both a great eye-candy, but it's also a great reference.The striking large photos are very attractive (of course), but the presence of plasic overlays that allows you to see annotations is a great idea; you can see the raw scene but also see the actual vista.The descriptive text is also good and quite informative.This is the only astronomy book I leave out since it appeals to anybody. ... Read more

    Isbn: 1552096106
    Sales Rank: 205412
    Subjects:  1. Astronomy - General    2. Atlases    3. Atlases - General    4. Constellations    5. Nature / Field Guide Books    6. Science    7. Science/Mathematics    8. Star Observation    9. Stars   


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