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    The Egyptian Hermes: A Historical Approach to the Late Pagan Mind
    by Garth Fowden
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 June, 1993)
    list price: $22.95 -- our price: $22.95
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    Reviews (5)

    5-0 out of 5 stars A seminal work (for academics)
    Fowden, as a writer, is admittedly no model of lucidity; at the same time, he is writing for academics, and is thus able to compress a huge amount into a small space.If you are not used to academic prose, you will find this book very difficult; it would also help if you know a certain amount about the reception of the Hermetica in 19th and 20th century historiography, and perhaps a bit about the late Classical era.

    At the same time, this book has been reprinted for a reason: it's the single most important historical argument about the Hermetica.For a long time, the Hermetica were understood to be purely Greek, essentially Hellenic misappropriations of pseudo-Egyptian ideas, recast in Neoplatonic style.What Fowden does is to show that these texts do have an important base within the dying Egyptian traditions of their day.

    For non-specialists, this may seem like small potatoes.But it changes everything.If you have read Frances Yates, for example, she argued that these texts were grotesquely misread by Ficino and the Renaissance tradition, on three counts: (1) they thought the texts were really, really ancient, more or less contemporary with Moses; (2) they thought the texts were Egyptian, not Greek; and (3) they thought the texts were really about magic (and not philosophy).Now there's no question that the Hermetica are from 1st-2d century Alexandria, but they are _not_ simply Greek; they are, in a sense, Egyptian formulations that draw on the then-influential Greek modes of philosophical thought.Furthermore, it means that the texts we usually think of as the Hermetic Corpus can and should be correlated with the PGM (the Greek Magical Papyri and their Demotic associates), changing the whole character of the texts by giving them a wildly different literary and ritual context.In other words, the Renaissance got the dating wrong, but in many respects got the rest more or less right; as a result, Fowden's book not only changes the way we read the Hermetica in their Alexandrian context, but also how we make sense of the Renaissance magical revival (Ficino, Pico, Agrippa, Bruno, etc.).

    If, having read this review, you think, "Who cares?" then this book is certainly not for you.If you think, "Wow!That's fascinating," then this is essential.I have seen the odd quibble with small points in Fowden's arguments, but I have not seen any serious attack on the main thrust of the book.Considering when it was first written, that's extraordinary.

    But you do need to be comfortable with academic prose.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Very Interesting but poorly written
    This is a very interesting book on Hermes centered Egyptian-Greek religious practice in the pre-Christian era, much more illumination than the mere reading of mythologies. However the writing of it is unfortunate. The author fills, not just each page, but each paragraph with 1960's cliché and psychobabble that was popular with hip academia of the day. It is a trip back in time to read this now archaic speech.
    This book deserves 4 or 5 stars except for its unreadability. It is difficult and arduous reading, as I found myself having to parse each sentence to extract it's meaning. I could only keep it up for short periods of time and hope to be able to finish the book someday.
    If only the publishers were to have the book rewritten by someone with a broader writing ability, this book would be an invaluable addition to anyone's library with an interest in Egyptian-Greek pagan religion as practiced in that era.
    Even with the books faults, the subject matter is so interesting that it may be worth the trouble for the hardy.

    4-0 out of 5 stars though not illustrated, this book is still useful
    The origins of Hermes Trismegistus, the sage cult hero of Graeco-RomanEgypt, to many people has seemingly been lost in the midst of time. This isthe first investigation undertaken into his mystic by a social historian.The technical and philosophical aspects of Hermetica as normally seen asseparate entities, but the author argues for their togetherness as wastypical of philosophy and religion of that era. The book has noillustrations or photos and in that sense it is quite scholarly. Definitelyfor those who are religion-orientated, especially and more preciselyinterested in Hermes. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0691024987
    Sales Rank: 369708
    Subjects:  1. Antiquities & Archaeology    2. Egypt    3. General    4. Hermes,    5. Hermetism    6. History    7. Mythology    8. Paganism    9. Religion    10. Roman Literature    11. Sociology    12. Trismegistus    13. Archaeology and Ancient History    14. Classics    15. Hermes    16. Mind, Body, Spirit    17. Religion / Antiquities & Archaeology   


    $22.95

    The Way of Hermes: New Translations of The Corpus Hermeticum and The Definitions of Hermes Trismegistus to Asclepius
    by Clement Salaman, Dorine, van Oyen, William D. Wharton, Jean-Pierre Mahé
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (01 March, 2000)
    list price: $19.95 -- our price: $13.57
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    Reviews (2)

    3-0 out of 5 stars Valuable but not quite definitive
    This text has some insightful commentary and historical analysis regarding the degree to which the Corpus Hermeticum does or does not reflect Egyptian theory and practice as opposed to the merely Hellenic (which point, being academic, is therefore of no great moment).This new translation, however, should assist those relatively unfamiliar with hermetic literature to begin to see suggestions of praxis within the text whereas many other translations obscure such.As with any such endeavor, decision(s) surrounding what to include and what not to include seem rather arbitrary. Nevertheless, on the whole, a worthwhile effort.And at the price, it is a very solid choice.

    The newly translated 'definitions' are valuable to those otherwise unfamiliar with the larger body of hermetic literature, but will not offer any revelations to those familiar with the larger world of hermetic study (which makes use ofPlatonic and Neo-Platonic texts as well as various genuine alchemical remains in arabic, latin, german, french, english, etc.)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Hermes Revealed
    "The Way of Hermes" is a god send to students of Alexandrian Hermeticism!Taking their cue from the premise that Hermeticism is a living and vital practice as well as philosophy, the translators have givenus an updated version that more closely expresses the actual meaning andintention of the principle Hermetic writings than preceding editions. Moving beyond the limits of dogmatic rationalism, "The Way ofHermes" expresses the mystical beauty and transcendental purpose forthe very existence of 'The Corpus' - to help humanity to know itself, andto know God. Of exceptional value are the foreword, afterward, and prefacein their expression of Hermetic philosophy and its impact on Westernthought.The additional English translation of "The Definitions ofHermes Trismegistus to Asclepius" make this a must read volume forstudents and practitioners of Hermeticism and Western esotericism. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0892818174
    Sales Rank: 330753
    Subjects:  1. Ancient Philosophy    2. General    3. History & Surveys - Ancient & Classical    4. Occult Sciences    5. Philosophy   


    $13.57

    Hermetica : The Greek Corpus Hermeticum and the Latin Asclepius in a New English Translation, with Notes and Introduction
    by Brian P. Copenhaver
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (12 October, 1995)
    list price: $32.99 -- our price: $32.99
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    Reviews (4)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Worth a lifetime of study
    This is a fantastic translation of the Pymander or Corpus Hermeticum and Asclepius.Since it's the only one I've read, I don't know how to compare it to others.This text was apparently rediscovered by the court of Cosimo di Medici in the 1400's, probably obtained from some source in Harran.Texts such as this were at the forefront of the syncretic mysticism and platonic/classical revival of the Italian Renaissance.This text might be something like a pagan hellenistic answer to scriptures or very obscure mystical and gnostic texts which describe very esoteric ideas that can only be understood through some kind of experience.On many levels it is very compatible with Christianity, Judaism or Islam because it may represent a kind of philosophical precursor of these religions from late antiquity.Even many of the early patriarchs of the orthodox christian tradition understood this compatibility and considered this text to represent a kind of sanctified pagan tradition or philosophy of sorts, which they actually used as proof of the validity of christianity.They did this by arguing that since pagans could come up with ideas so close to christianity, that this supported a belief in the new faith.For this reason, on the level of mundane theological and philosophical history, this text is very important for an understanding of how early christians and other monotheists viewed their relationship to paganism in a world that was still very pagan.The notes in this book are also extremely helpful and worthwhile.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Well-researched edition of a vital document
    Much like the Chaldean oracles, the Corpus Hermeticum is a vital document for all those who have an interest in the eclectic thought of the period covering the first centuries AD; this recent edition is certainly worthy of being added to the library of the scholar and curious reader alike. It includes the seventeen Greek treatises which have been brought together over the centuries as the Corpus Hermeticum, in addition to the Latin `Asclepius', which is by far the longest piece of them all. No Greek or Latin text accompanies the translation, but Copenhaver provides extensive notes, many of which directly address specific points of the translation and pick up where studies in hermetism had left off. In these notes, there are numerous references to previous editions of the Hermetica, especially to the work of A.D. Nock/A.-J. Festugière (in French) and of W. Scott (in English). The introduction also does a good job of describing both the context in which these pieces emerged, and the way they have been read and edited in the following centuries.

    5-0 out of 5 stars In the footsteps of the 'Thrice Greatest' Hermes
    This translation of the Greek 'Corpus Hermeticum' and the Latin 'Asclepius' has been specifically undertaken for English-speakers. However,the real benefits of the translation are the excellent introduction and inexcess of 260 pages of notes on the text making significant references toprevious translations such as those of Zielinski, Reitzenstein, Festugiere,Mahe and Fowden. 'Hermetica' will be a fascinating journey for all thoseinterested in Egypto-Hellenistic philosophy or for those searching for analternative to the rigid orthodoxy of some other religious systems.However, there is little here for those who seek to become a spell-castingmagus - this is Hermetism, rather than populist Hermeticism! In thethanksgiving at the end of Asclepius, the spells which were present in thePapyrus Mimaut and also in Nag Hammadi Codex VI.6 are omitted. Thesecentral texts of Hermetism are learned, philosophical treatises as opposedto popular, occultist writings - "a blend of theology, cosmology,anthropology, ethics, soteriology and eschatology."

    Most readers willprobably find some degree of confusion within the Corpus Hermeticum.Different authors of the various treatises appear to have taken part inPeripatetic-Platonic-Stoic debate within the surviving texts. Much of theprevious criticism however has focussed on the Egyptian - Hellenicargument; Hermes Trismegistus being a syncretic fusion of the Greekmessenger of the gods with the Egyptian Thoth (pr. something akin toT-HO-TI). Just to be confusing, the character 'Tat' is also a variant ofThoth is some of the Corpus' texts. Linked with this Peripatetic-Platonicdebate is the Corpus' attitude towards dualism which should be adistinguishing feature between Hermetism and early Gnostic Christianity -but sometimes isn't all that clear-cut. Further complications arise throughCopenhaver's extensive references to the Chaldean Oracles.

    The textsopen with POIMANDRES, 'the shepherd man' (poimen aner) although some stillsearch for a Coptic root. The nature of 'true reality' (see Plato's'Timaeus') establishes itself as the central focus in the very first lineof CH I. It is Mind which will free the soul from the fleshy darkness ofits bodily incarceration. The texts then move on to the universal discoursebetween Hermes and Tat opening up a Stoic - Peripatetic debate on whetherthere is a void or non-entity without the Cosmos. A third alternative ispresented : that the surrounding space both encircles and moves theCosmos.

    The most Peripataetic of texts according to Zielinski is CH IV inwhich activity is clearly seen as positive and passivity as negative. Thereare some indications of common authorship between I and VII although anumber of Western translators have found evidence of strong Judaicinfluences in VII. CH VII also introduces the metaphor of the 'chiton'(vestment, cloak, shawl) as a symbol of the body which fed through into thewritings of Philo, Plotinus and the Valentinian Gnostics - this must beshed for the soul's ascent. The tenth discourse introduces another image ofthe chiton. Unlike the chiton of CH VIII, this garment must be acquired torise and to take on a demonic cloak. With a good mind the soul can pass onto something greater, but to nothing lesser.

    Within the 17 Greektreatises the Stoic concept of 'sumpatheia' (the organic unity of theCosmos) is only mentioned specifically once in CH VIII although itsinfluence can be elsewhere. Scott suggested that one of the latest of theextant logoi was XIII, the diexodikos logos, on account of its dependenceon CH I and XI. This is essentially concerned with `palingenesia' whichBuchsel sees as the Stoic opposite of ekpurosis - the great conflagrationinto which the currently existing Cosmos would disappear only to berestored under apokatastasis.

    The historical development of translationsof the texts has given them rather illogical numberings. In theory CH IXshould take place immediately after the Latin Asclepius - as the latter isa translation of the 'perfect discourse', the 'teleios logos' rendered byLactantius as the 'Sermo perfectus'. It is an exposition of the discourseon sensation which clearly rejects the Platonic position in favour of amore Stoic interpretation. Thanks to Adrien Turnebus' translation in 1554there is no Corpus Hermeticum XV (Ficino's translation ended atXIV).

    Mind only appears as interlocutor in CH I and XI. CH XI is alsodistinctive in that aion (eternity) appears 27 times within the text andonly 3 times elsewhere. Aion was the supreme deity of Westernised Mithraismand is connected with Zrvan Akarana, Saturnus and Kronos, with Orpheism, inphilosophical terms with the Stoic heimarmene (which appear elsewhere inthe Corpus), perhaps even with the Phoenician Ba'al Shamin, and - inastro-magical texts - with the 'holy Agathos Daimon'. There is also theAion of the Chaldean Oracles, which - according to Lewy - is 'not only adivinity, but also a noetic hypostasis'. Here, as in CH XIV, there is onlyone maker. This is a direct rebuttal of the Gnostic position and,internally, of the position outlined by I and XIII.

    Asclepius (orImhotep in the original Egyptian) is most likely a collection of fragmentsfrom other texts. The Hermetic praise of human dignity stops distinctlyshort of the physical and sexual aspects of the human condition.Asclepiusis far more apocalyptic and laden within divine retribution than theCorpus. Copenhaver finds references to the Egyptian apocalyptic story ofPotter's Oracle in his predecessors' translations centred around a Khnum, aram-headed creator-god. But the message in Asclepius is clear, Egypt - this`image of heaven' - will forget its Hermetic ways and "will be filledcompletely with tombs and corpses" and "the reverent will be thought mad".

    We should all try to learn something from Hermetica, for beneath thecomplexities is real truth.

    Then he said to me : "Keep all in mind thatyou wish to learn, and I will teach you." Saying this, he changed hisappearance and everything was immediately opened to me...(Corpus HermeticumI) ... Read more

    Isbn: 0521425433
    Sales Rank: 53770
    Subjects:  1. Ancient Philosophy    2. Ancient and Classical    3. Fiction    4. General    5. Literary    6. New Age / Parapsychology    7. Fiction / Literary    8. Other prose: classical, early & medieval    9. Unexplained phenomena   


    $32.99

    The Hermetica: The Lost Wisdom of the Pharaohs
    by TimothyFreke
    Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (08 March, 1999)
    list price: $13.95 -- our price: $11.16
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    Reviews (13)

    1-0 out of 5 stars Misinformed
    I have not read the book itself, but by reading the description on the back cover it is obvious that the publishers, if not the author himself, are misinformed.

    The Hermetica is not an ANCIENT Egyptian text, as the description indicates, but was rather written in late antiquity, in the early centuries AD.That said, it WAS written in Egypt.

    The writings were highly influential, and many Renaissance Humanists and Neoplatonists studied them closely--Ranaissance scholars DID believe them to be of Ancient Egyptian origins, however as stated previously, this is not the case.

    That said, the book itself might be useful and relevant, but the back cover description error throws the rest of the book into serious question, even as a popular as opposed to scholarly take on the subject.

    I would strongly recommend that interested people purchase a different translation--there are a number of translations that come up on the search, any one of them would probably be more accurate and useful than this one.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Exercise your powers
    I have this super-power, you see.... It's called biblio-optical-gnosis....that means that I can judge a book by it's cover.If you guys can't tell this book is a new-age money maker to scam the gullible from just looking at this cheesey, too-bright cartoon cover...then, well, you don't have the same magic power that I do... sorry friends.

    4-0 out of 5 stars More uninformed onesided favortism
    If ppl are going to make comments like, Hermetica predates the concepts of osiris(ausar) and isis(auset) then it would help if u show proof!The Egyptian concepts of god self and the material universe of alchemy are older than the Hermeticum which was just a copy of it by the western invaders athens(greeks)or a(hittite)group.There is historical evidence to support this claim, go to Egypt talk with the sufi's or any well known unbias anthropologist, archeologist,geologist, etc and also look at the artifacts which have been carbon dated as preceding the hermetica by 500 or more yrs besides ppls misconception of Egyptians explanation of the neteru as the attributes of one enitity speaks volumes lmao! the Egyptians also taught that everything came from a singular source which could only be known by its attributes and not as the god lmao or the male dominate figure hmmm! very sexist and patriarch tsk tsk.This book is like many other books that reveal the truth, always shot down. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0874779502
    Sales Rank: 81767
    Subjects:  1. Ancient - Egypt    2. Ancient Egypt - History    3. General    4. Gnosticism    5. Hermetism    6. History - General History    7. Occultism    8. Religion    9. Religion / General   


    $11.16

    The Hermetic Tradition : Symbols and Teachings of the Royal Art
    by Julius Evola
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 January, 1995)
    list price: $16.95 -- our price: $11.53
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    Reviews (2)

    5-0 out of 5 stars If you're serious about this subject...
    The impressions of Hermeticism that have formed over many years of Jungian interpretations, Theosophical speculations and well-intentioned 20th century academic investigations will have to be looked at anew - and to tell the truth, pretty much discarded by anyone who encounters this book. It's really not an overstatement to say that Evola's work simply trumps other interpretations. His is not so much an 'interpretation' as much as it is a genuine teaching. The product of a pure, direct, and very deep experience of the material, The Hermetic Tradition offers the most lucid overall treatment that this often dizzyingly difficult subject has ever seen. Evola managed to do this somehow without "dumbing it down" for a broad public readership, and in doing so he has rendered us a tremendous and unparalleld service. As SPECIALIZED material, applicable to a SPECIFIC mode of percieving the world and one's place in it, with a SPECIFIC core spiritual discipline at it's heart, the Tradition of Hermeticism has been done justice by this book. Because of that, for some it will not be easy reading - even more difficult will be putting it's teachings to practice. But for those of us who, for all of our familiarity with the 'occult' Hermetic symbols and the 'psychological' operations of alchemy, are still left mainly un-transformed by such understandings, this book is for you. It cannot be recommended highly enough.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A text on Hermeticism which is itself a Hermetic Work!
    Baron Evola, always controversial and provocative, is no less so here.Discussing many facets of the Magnum Opus ( 'Corrosive waters', and'Path of Venus' for instance) which are overlooked, misunderstood, or just plain ignored by other writers on the subject, this work should be consisered a necessary part of any Hermetic Library.Evola draws extensively from Greek, Latin, Arabic, and English language expositions of the Hermetico-Alchemic Art.The notes are impressive in their relevance and ability to increase the depth of qualitative comprehension.One could wish there had been a more comprehensive index.Be prepared to have cherished assumptions challenged and intellectual horizons broadened. Read with Evola's "Eros and the Mysteries of Love," and "The Mystery of the Grail."

    Good Luck! ... Read more

    Isbn: 0892814519
    Sales Rank: 260499
    Subjects:  1. Body, Mind & Spirit    2. Healing - General    3. Hermetism    4. Magick Studies    5. New Age    6. Occult Sciences    7. Religion - World Religions    8. Symbolism   


    $11.53

    Giordano Bruno and the Hermetic Tradition
    by Frances A. Yates
    Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (26 February, 1991)
    list price: $22.00 -- our price: $22.00
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    Reviews (8)

    1-0 out of 5 stars Shame on the University of Chicago
    This is not a review of Ms. Yates's writing.Instead, I am awarding the single star to the physical book perpetrated by the University of Chicago Press in 1991.The good news is that this edition doesn't cost very much.The bad news is that the 1991 edition is a bad reproduction of an earlier edition.The ink bleeds all over some of the pages.There are diagonal streaks on many pages.Sometimes the ink is light grey on one side of a diagonal streak, while it is dark and smudged on the other side.Parts of letters that landed in the streak are missing.A note on the back of the title page claims only that "The paper used in this publication meets the minimum requirements of the ... Standard ... for Library Materials."Does this less than ringing endorsement mean that the paper is acidic and will soon deteriorate?If so, it won't be much of a loss.

    3-0 out of 5 stars A Place to Start
    This book isn't a biography of Bruno or anything close.The opinions put forth in this book are rationalistic nonsense, as another reviewer has stated, and they lack soul or understanding.This book is good for one thing:exposing yourself to Bruno's influences and using it as a bibliography for other works.This is the only defense I will give this book.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Ian Myles Slater on: Re-thinking the Past
    I'm going to begin this review by explaining what the book is NOT about, since a number of reviewers seem to have been disappointed by what it contains. I will also include where to find information on some these topics.

    "Giordano Bruno and The Hermetic Tradition" is NOT a biography of Bruno (1548-1600), who, according to the common view was burned at the stake for teaching Copernican astronomy (this was one of the charges, but was a side issue). There is a need for a modern biography, but this volume, first published in 1964 -- not, as the listing suggests, 1991 -- was a contribution to understanding Bruno, and not intended as a full account.

    (Amazon gives the date of the current University of Chicago trade paperback; there was also a similar Midway Paperback edition in 1979, and a 1968 mass-market paperback edition, as well.)

    It is NOT a study of the traditions surrounding Hermes Trismegistus ("thrice-great Hermes"), a Greco-Roman version of the Egyptian god Thoth and the Greek Hermes, among other things, who has had a long history in Western (and Islamic) tradition; it discusses some of them, in the context of Renaissance and Reformation Europe. Collected papers by Antoine Faivre, "The Eternal Hermes: From Greek God to Alchemical Magus," translated by Joscelyn Godwin, now approximate such a full account (paperback, 1995).

    It is also NOT an historical account of the Greek and Latin (and Arabic, and some other) mystical / philosophical, magical, and alchemical texts purporting to be the works of Hermes and his disciples. For that, the historically-minded can turn to Garth Fowden's difficult, but rewarding, "The Egyptian Hermes: A Historical Approach to the Late Pagan Mind" (1986; with new Preface and corrections, as a MYTHOS paperback, 1993). The curious may also look to David Frankfurter's "Religion in Roman Egypt: Assimilation and Resistance" (also a MYTHOS paperback, 1998) for a fuller context in popular religion. Those who want to adopt Hermeticism as part of their personal religious experience may need to go elsewhere.

    It is NOT a translation of those ancient texts, some of which it summarizes for the reader unfamiliar with this rather obscure literature. For those important in Yates' account, see Brian Copenhaver's "Hermetica: The Greek 'Corpus Hermeticum' and the Latin 'Asclepius' in a new English translation, with notes and introduction" (1992; in paperback since 1995). The testimonies (references in other writers) and fragments (mainly excerpts preserved in a Byzantine anthology) are in the four-volume "Hermetica: The Ancient Greek and Latin Writings ..." (1924), edited and translated by Walter Scott (not the novelist). Yates warns against his high-handed editorial treatment of the main texts, but the testimonies, and most of the fragments, are given in more conservative forms; this too is (or was) available in paperback.

    It is NOT an account of the Western Occult tradition in the Renaissance, with or without instructions for the would-be practitioner. For an account of the main texts and issues, the curious can begin with Yates' main authority in this matter, D.P. Walker's "Spiritual and Demonic Magic from Ficino to Campanella" (1958; there is a recent paperback). Walker and others are critically reviewed, with new hypotheses, in Ioan P. Couliano's "Eros and Magic in the Renaissance" (1987); a different perspective, and some important corrections to Couliano's data, are found in Noel P. Brann's "Trithemius and Magical Theology: A Chapter in the Controversy over Occult Studies in Early Modern Europe" (1999; both in paperback).

    That being the case, what IS "Giordano Bruno and the Hermetic Tradition," and is it worth reading?

    Yates claimed that the book began as a translation of Bruno's Italian dialogue, "La Cena de le Ceneri," set in Elizabethan London, and grew. (The dialogue has since been translated, with useful notes, as "The Ash Wednesday Supper," by Edward A. Gosselin and Lawrence A. Lerner (1977; a Renaissance Society of America Reprint Texts paperback, 1995).

    The book is an attempt to restore a missing, or at least neglected, chapter, in Western intellectual history. The "Hermetic Tradition" in the title is the set of beliefs about the supposed Hermes Trismegistus which Renaissance Europe inherited from the Church Fathers. They variously saw him as an ancient Prophet, and the real source of Plato's philosophy, and perhaps the disciple of Abraham or Moses, maybe even their teacher; or as a wicked tool of Satan. When Greek manuscripts of supposed Hermetic texts became available in Florence, the Medici put a priority on translating them, instead of Plato or Plotinus, and Marsilio Ficino obliged, launching a wave of excitement among some European thinkers.

    What these thinkers, including, but not limited to, Bruno, did with, and to, the material they were given is the burden of the book. The enthusiasm eventually went underground, especially as it came to be realized that the wonderful Hermetic texts were not only post-Platonic, but post-Christian. This view took centuries to permeate European thought, however, and true believers in the Hermetic texts are still around. ("The Magic Flute" is just one example of originally Hermetic ideas about Egypt surviving into the Enlightenment.)

    Bruno himself knocked about Europe, promoting plans for reconciling Catholics and Protestants, spending time -- not very happily -- in Elizabethan England. The Holy Office of the Inquisition eventually became aware that his plan seemed to involve the restoration of Egyptian Sun-worship -- the True, Original Religion of Mankind, as revealed by the Divine Hermes -- in a Christian cloak. There was also more than a hint of plans to use magic, and astrally empowered images, to achieve this and other goals. The heliocentric theory was for Bruno, it seems, just one more proof of the divine nature of the Sun. One can understand their indignation.

    It is this Bruno, the Hermetic, the Magus, and the very amateur scientist, which is Yates' centerpiece. She continues the story with some latter-day Renaissance Hermetics, including Campanella (whose utopian "City of the Sun" seems to have revived, perhaps independently, some of Bruno's pet projects).

    As someone who was a college student in the early 1970s, I can recall the impact in several areas of this book (then in its 1968 Vintage Books mass-market paperback), and its 1966 follow-up on another neglected area of European history, "The Art of Memory." Although in later writings Yates tended to leap from bold insights to unsupported conclusions, these two volumes helped rewrite the way a generation of historians would look at the European past. Some of the volumes I have mentioned would not have appeared, or would have been very different, without Yates' contribution. And yes, although not a complete portrait of either Bruno or Hermeticism, the book is still worth the reader's time and attention. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0226950077
    Sales Rank: 156891
    Subjects:  1. History & Surveys - Modern    2. Philosophy    3. Renaissance    4. Renaissance Philosophy    5. Philosophy / Modern   


    $22.00

    Initiation into Hermetics
    by Franz Bardon
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (March, 2001)
    list price: $24.95 -- our price: $24.95
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    Reviews (40)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Beware!
    I have lived with this book on my shelf since 1973 and I can say that 1) it will indeed change your life and 2) it will teach you to strengthen your imagination to such a point that you will be able to "use" it to achieve certain things--whether real or the result of self-delusion, or real in spite of being the product of self-delusion, I will not begin to say.But 3) this book does hint at, and eventually allows you to understand, the awesome reponsibility of traveling on this solitary path and 4) it will ultimately leave you wondering why such comparatively trifling achievements, at such great personal risk, are really worth the problems that one encounters in one's daily life through practicing the exercises.Consider the fact that almost everyone who advances on the road to Hermetics endures chaotic lives and risks a terrible end.Bardon himself died under mysterious circumstances, and he is just one of many.Therefore, read the biographies of other practioners first, weigh the pros and cons, ask if a controlled form of madness is your destiny, and by all means beware before using this book.You just might end up wondering if what you are seeing is "really" there, or merely the product of your imaginative training, and which "really real" is "real"?The awkward translation and the Germanic lore do not bother me in this training manual as much as they do in Bardon's more literary efforts.

    5-0 out of 5 stars This is an interesting book to say the least.
    The greatest, most supreme magick, is the ability to abide in perfect happiness, untainted bliss in every moment. Subsequently It is also the hardest to attain. Only infinte power can touch it.
    If infinite power is ones focus, then this book is an early step in that direction(lessness). But it is not a direct path to it, it is more of a dead end side street. A worthy experince nonetheless, before one rejoins the main path again.
    If the pure happiness that is brought about by enlightenment is an equivalent of a PhD then this book would be studied somewhere around junior school.And necessarily so, as the sense of an `I am' precedes that of an `I am not'.

    The book in question is a course in the attempted mastery of duality, it's fundamental teaching requires and revolves around a `doer'. As the `doer' or `ego' advances it steadily accrues `power' in order to exercise `powerlessness'.This is akin to asking a child to sit all day long next to a candy bar without eating it.
    It's job is to bring up a battle within oneself, the battle over right and wrong, good and bad etc, etc. Franz Bardon relates his own experience of this in `Frabato The Magician' where he recounts his life and death battle with a powerful `black lodge'.Now, remember it takes two to play at duality, the author is clearly unable to detach himself from it, unable to master it. The 'good'is trying to wipe out the 'bad' and vice versa. except that both sides see themselves as 'good' and the other as 'bad'.
    If the level of goodies and baddies appeals to you, and one sees themself as a potentially powerful goody; then this book is for you and it will be of great help.

    However if you are looking to exit the up's and down's of duality and your primary goal is to find peace and happiness one will need to move on to becoming powerless from apowerless place.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Most Comprehensive Mind Training Manual
    This book is loaded from cover to cover with practical mind-training exercises - from developing the power of one's imagination, to training different senses and perfecting the ability to use them individually or in conjunction with each other; to working with the elements; transfering one's consciousness; generating and projecting energy; and much more.By the time you're done going thoroughly through all the exercises in this book and practicing them until you master them - your ability to use the power of your mind will increase beyond your wildest dreams - and you will have many interesting experiences along the way.

    ... Read more

    Isbn: 1885928122
    Sales Rank: 57150
    Subjects:  1. New Age   


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    Hermetica, Vol. 1: The Ancient Greek and Latin Writings Which Contain Religious or Philosophic Teachings Ascribed to Hermes Trismegistus
    by Walter Scott
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 May, 2001)
    list price: $39.95 -- our price: $25.17
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    Reviews (2)

    5-0 out of 5 stars The core teachings of Gnosis
    I am going to review this volume because I read every single English word of it, cover-to-cover. I admit that I didn't read the corresponding original language text, because my Latin was never all that good, and I have no Greek. I wish that I did, though. Just in English translation I can see where these teachings transport you to an entirely different sort of mind-set, an entirely different world.

    Indeed, you will either come to develop a sort of intuitive understanding of the spiritual principles being discused here, or you will simple give up in disgust and dismiss it as meaningless and incomprehensible. Perhaps it is incomprehensible to modern sensibility, but it is far from meaningless. If you are familiar with Plato and Plotinus it will help. I also find that a familiarity with the concept of the Tao helps with understanding what is meant by Kosmos. I suppose that there could be esoteric teachings encoded and hidden in the original text, but personally I find the exoteric spiritual and metaphysical speculations to be quite interesting and valuable in their own right.

    There was a reason that these teachings were preserved through so many centuries, while so much else was consigned to flames or left to rot....

    4-0 out of 5 stars Pretty good.
    This is a pretty fascinating book, containing the works attributed to Hermes in English as well as the non-translated version, revealing one version on one page and the other version on the next page;Thus, when one reads the book, they find the non-translated version on one page and the English version on the other page, with footnotes and stuff to help out.Overall, a good book, and it gives some understanding of the thinking of the ancient Magickians and other Occultists.Worth getting, overall. ... Read more

    Isbn: 1570626308
    Sales Rank: 385934
    Subjects:  1. General    2. History & Surveys - Ancient & Classical    3. Philosophy    4. Religious    5. Philosophy / General   


    $25.17

    Hermetica, Part 1: The Ancient Greek and Latin Writings Which Contain Religious or Philosophic Teachings Ascribed to Hermes Trismegistus
    by Walter, Sir Scott
    Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 March, 1997)
    list price: $42.95 -- our price: $35.13
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    Reviews (2)

    2-0 out of 5 stars Dated and problematic
    If you just want to read the Hermetica, read Brian Copenhaver's translations, which are much better than Scott's.And of course, these aren't by Sir Walter Scott (of Ivanhoe fame) anyway, if you're interested in him for some reason, but by a quite different Walter Scott.

    Scott's translations are still valuable for the specialist.You should be able to find used copies of the trade paperback edition (Hermes House, at one point), though, which are rather better bound than these Kessinger xeroxes.

    If you have Copenhaver, you'll probably want these, although I'd recommend a different printing.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The core teachings of Gnosis
    I am going to review this volume because I read every single English word of it, cover-to-cover. I admit that I didn't read the corresponding original language text, because my Latin was never all that good, and I have no Greek. I wish that I did, though. Just in English translation I can see where these teachings transport you to an entirely different sort of mind-set, an entirely different world.
    Indeed, you will either come to develop a sort of intuitive understanding of the spiritual principles being discused here, or you will simple give up in disgust and dismiss it as meaningless and incomprehensible. Perhaps it is incomprehensible to modern sensibility, but it is far from meaningless. If you are familiar with Plato and Plotinus it will help. I also find that a familiarity with the concept of the Tao helps with understanding what is meant by Kosmos. I suppose that there could be esoteric teachings encoded and hidden in the original text, but personally I find the exoteric spiritual and metaphysical speculations to be quite interesting and valuable in their own right.
    There was a reason that these teachings were preserved through so many centuries, while so much else was consigned to flames or left to rot.... ... Read more

    Isbn: 1564594815
    Sales Rank: 510220
    Subjects:  1. History & Surveys - Ancient & Classical    2. Occultism    3. Philosophy    4. Religious   


    $35.13

    Kybalion: A Study of the Hermetic Philosophy of Ancient Egypt and Greece
    by Three Initiates
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (31 May, 1942)
    list price: $26.95 -- our price: $16.98
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    Reviews (45)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Amazing little book
    This book provides several general principles of the universe and how they operate--such that one can utilize them in living one's life to the full.It's like a General Systems Theory (GST) approach to metaphysics or an attempt to evolve physics into metaphysics--though that may not have been the authors' intention.General Systems Theory is an attempt to codify basic laws of nature across a multiplicity of disciplines.Certain equations, for instance, are virtually identical (except for embedded constants) in widely divergent fields.This volume provides a number of general principles which it claims to be relevant across highly divergent circumstances.The principles concern both human behavior (at least as a referent or resultant) and the basic laws of nature.They remind me a bit of Activation Theory in psychology (also called Arousal Theory).This involves the application of the Normal Distribution (a general principle of statistics, humans, and life) to human activity and its effectiveness.Maybe that's a stretch in reviewing this book, maybe not.In any case, I usually give away books after I've read them.I keep precious few for reference or loan.I've kept a copy of this book for years, maybe decades.I know of no book like it.

    5-0 out of 5 stars As Simple and As Beautiful as a Falling Leaf
    I always keep a few extra copies of this book on-hand, because I know that if I happen to meet somebody who is genuinely curious about Western Occultism, this is the one book that is most likely to help them find their own way onto the Path.The odd thing is that I don't really expect them to understand much of what they read, at least not initially.That's the marvelous thing about The Kybalion-- it plants seeds.Many of the spiritual truths expressed in this book seem obvious or trivial the first time that you read them, only to gain added significance in future readings.

    It's not that any of the teachings in The Kybalion are particularly esoteric or obscure, either.This book is written in plain English.There is no misdirection and there are no blinds.Like life itself, the Three Initiates enunciate simple truths that can only be understood through purposeful reflection.

    The Kybalion is essentially an introduction to the Seven Hermetic Principles, which are astute observations about nature: Reality is a mental phenomenon; Man is intimately connected with the universe, and inwardly reflects many of its outward characteristics; There are no constants-- everything is in a state of flux;All things are related in one way or another, differing mainly in increments rather than according to hard classifications; Change tends to follow cyclic patterns; Everything that happens has a cause, and creates other effects, even when immediate causes and effects aren't obvious to the casual observer; Everything that exists can be positive or negative, relative to other things.These truths are simple, perhaps obvious, yet proper understanding of the Seven Hermetic Principles could easily take an entire lifetime to achieve.Though long, the Path begins with a single step-- and the Kybalion is an earnest help to any serious and sincere student who wishes to make that start.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Seven Universal Principles - Seven Laws of Nature
    A number of other books has been written about these seven principles, using somewhat more modern language, but this book is the classic.This is not just a theory or a philosophy - the principles, being universal, are down-to-earth practical.If you apply them consciously in your life, your life will change.

    While in times long gone by, these may have seemed to be only arbitrary spiritual principles, they are in accord with the view of quantum physics.Kybalion states that universe is mind-like in nature; quantum physics states that the universe is composed out of intelligent energy.The rest of the book describes how to manifest anything with one's thoughts - the process of manifestation, and it reminds me of the book "Dimensional Structure of Consciousness" by Samuel Avery.

    The most important part of this book - other than pointing out these principles is that they are UNIVERSAL - they allways work, they express throughout nature and if you use them and apply the consciously, you can create whatever you can possibly desire in your life.You will know then that there is a law and that it works with mathematical precision, and that you can ALWAYS count on it.

    The moment you grasp this truth, you will never ever again wish or hope for something to happen, you will know that you have the power to create it and you will be certain of it.And when you use this principles consciously and experience the truth of them - no one in the entire world will ever be able to talk you out of fulfilling your heart's desires.Even if the entire world doubts and laughs at you, you will not care because you'll KNOW that you CAN.You will have the "key". ... Read more

    Isbn: 0766100804
    Sales Rank: 400562
    Subjects:  1. History & Surveys - Ancient & Classical    2. Metaphysics    3. Mysticism    4. Occultism    5. Philosophy   


    $16.98

    The Divine Pymander of Hermes Mercurius Trismegistus (Secret Doctrine Reference Series)
    by John Everard
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (15 April, 2000)
    list price: $14.00 -- our price: $14.00
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    Reviews (1)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Pure Gold for all GENUINE seekers
    For all those who want to study the the sublime Occult Mysteries this book is one of the very few that reveals the TRUE LIGHT. This is not a book for those seeking "glamour", "thrills", "mystery"or "instant enlightenment". Within the golden pages of the"Divine Pymander" the genuine, sincere seeker after Truth willfind the answers to the great questions of life clearly and beautifully setforth. Here are true elucidations of the secrets of the Soul, Mind andbody, of the beginning of Life, of the universe, and the ultimate purposeof Man and his true constitition and destiny. One could read a thousandbooks and not find the great truths revealed in this little volume. Nosincere seeker after Truth and spititual enlightenment will be disappointedwith this book. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0913510300
    Sales Rank: 408159
    Subjects:  1. Philosophy    2. Reference   


    $14.00

    The Divine Pymander of Hermes Mercurius Trismegistus (Secret Doctrine Reference Series)
    by Everard, John Everard
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (01 June, 1985)
    list price: $14.00 -- our price: $14.00
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    Reviews (1)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Pure Gold for all GENUINE seekers
    For all those who want to study the the sublime Occult Mysteries this book is one of the very few that reveals the TRUE LIGHT. This is not a book for those seeking "glamour", "thrills", "mystery"or "instant enlightenment". Within the golden pages of the"Divine Pymander" the genuine, sincere seeker after Truth willfind the answers to the great questions of life clearly and beautifully setforth. Here are true elucidations of the secrets of the Soul, Mind andbody, of the beginning of Life, of the universe, and the ultimate purposeof Man and his true constitition and destiny. One could read a thousandbooks and not find the great truths revealed in this little volume. Nosincere seeker after Truth and spititual enlightenment will be disappointedwith this book. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0913510076
    Sales Rank: 1011560
    Subjects:  1. Hermetism    2. Religion   


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    The Secret Teachings of All Ages (Reader's Edition)
    by Manley P.Hall
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (23 October, 2003)
    list price: $24.95 -- our price: $16.47
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    Reviews (41)

    5-0 out of 5 stars SECRET TEACHINGS OF ALL AGES - What a lovely book!
    The Secret Teachings of All Ages is truly an encyclopedic volume, richly illustrated with masonic, hermetic, qabbalistic and rosicrucian symbolism (the illustrations are breathtaking) and philosophical interpretations.

    While the book covers wide range of topics, it essentially follows the path of Western esoteric traditions - all the way back from Egypt and Greece, through the famous European alchemists (St. Germain and Nicholas Flammel), and onward to Rosicrucians - as can be expected from the title, but it briefly touches upon symbolism from Islam and Amrican Indian symbolism.


    5-0 out of 5 stars THERE IS NO BETTER THAN THIS SPIRITUAL PRIMER!!
    For understanding the scope of spiritual subject matter, this is your guide!!What else can I say; this paperback volume is much easier to carry around also, than the big heavy hardback volume with all the beautiful paintings and pictures!!This will help you understand the "Kingdom Within" and to reactivate your understanding of the reminder Jesus gave when he said: "All these things that I do ye shall do also". Other similar reminders were masonic: you will reap what you sow; and Platonic: Know Thyself.

    3-0 out of 5 stars This could be a better book...
    Sure this book is a classic.I gave this book three stars because this could be a better book.Although the full text is presented in this edition,most of the pictures and illustrations are missing.It's claimed that most of the pictures and illustrations are not the most important ones, then why put them in the other editions?Sounds like the buyer is being short changed.Hall says in the title that these are secret teachings.It's not secret, because all of this knowledge is available in books if you look hard enough.However, he does a brilliant job of putting all this information together and the buyer is getting a good deal.The truth is that all secret knowledge is already in books and openly available.It's true that the ancient sages would be irresponsible in putting this knowledge explicitly out in the open.It could be used by evil people to work incredible destruction.The knowledge though had to be transmitted or it would be lost.How then is the knowledge open to the worthy and hidden from the unworthy?Hall gives the clue in the chapter on Shakespeare.That is by constantly rereading and studying the murky passages and others in occult books, the understanding will open up and the secrets revealed.This is the master key to using other cryptograms as well.In India, the ancient sages had students of yoga reread and study well known yoga texts such as the yoga sutras of Pantajali.Why?To discover the secrets and inner meanings of the texts. The goal of the ancient mysteries is for man to save himself and reveal the mysteries of life.This could not be accomplished if the knowledge had no way to be known.The occult has genuine teachings, but it also has many frauds and con artists.They couldn't care less about the occult, but they care about your money.Hall isn't lying when he says these are secret teachings. They are not secret on the surface meaning, but they are in the depths of the knowledge revealed only by study. ... Read more

    Isbn: 1585422509
    Sales Rank: 5112
    Subjects:  1. Body, Mind & Spirit    2. General    3. History    4. Mysteries, Religious    5. New Age    6. Occult Sciences    7. Occultism    8. Religion - Prayer & Spirituality    9. Secret societies    10. Spirituality - General    11. Symbolism    12. Self-Help / General   


    $16.47

    Egyptian Mysteries: New Light on Ancient Knowledge (Art and Imagination)
    by Lucie Lamy
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 April, 1989)
    list price: $16.95 -- our price: $16.95
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    Reviews (1)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Ancient wisdom made accessible
    The world of ancient Egypt was home to a deep and richly intricatespiritual tradition.This is readily apparent in ancient Egyptianiconography, but for most people, those arcane symbols remain a closedbook.Lucy Lamy's book is a masterpiece that opens these ancient vaults ofwisdom to the modern reader.I found extraordinary spiritual insights inwhat I have previously seen as a dry and opaque tradition.After the essayin part one, part two ("Plates") and part three ("Themes") present imageswith text explaining where they fit into Ms. Lamy's analysis.Having readthe essay, the images made sense - I understood where they fit in thiselaborate mythological system.If you have ever been captivated by, buthave failed to understand, Egyptian iconography, this is the perfect bookfor you.I also highly recommend this book to anyone interested in thehistory of esoteric spiritual traditions. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0500810249
    Sales Rank: 602176
    Subjects:  1. Ancient Egyptian Religion    2. Art, Egyptian    3. Comparative Religion    4. Egypt    5. Eqypt    6. General    7. History: American    8. Mythology, Egyptian    9. New Age / Parapsychology    10. Religion   


    $16.95

    Platonic Theology: Books I-IV (I Tatti Renaissance Library)
    by Marsilio Ficino, James Hankins, William R. Bowen, Michael J. B. Allen, John Warden
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (01 April, 2001)
    list price: $29.95 -- our price: $29.95
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    Reviews (2)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Useful, profound, and life changing
    Useful to the scholar. Thought provoking as intellectual work. Life changing in world view. There is an alternative to secularism or post-modernism.

    4-0 out of 5 stars "Divine"
    The Italian philosopher Marsilio Ficino, who was renowned for his Latin translations of all Plato's dialogues, set out to prove that the tenets of Platonism, instead of Aristotelianism, were fundamentally compatible with Christianity. He attempted this not only by acting as the primary mover of the Florentine academy, but also through his magnanimous patron Cosimo de' Medici who apportioned Ficino the leisure to commence his monumental work, "The Platonic Theology," which is offered here for the first time in a long-awaited English translation. Marsilio Ficino's work--from what may be seen from the first of five anticipated volumes--is an artful, straightforward representation of the divine philosophy of Plato, magnificently garbed under a brilliant and definitive medieval synthesis. Of the work itself Ficino says, "the Platonic mysteries are set forth as clearly as possible...so that...we may reveal the Platonic teaching, which is in complete accord with the divine law." Like all Christian-Platonists, Ficino used Augustine as a model for his orthodox amalgamation of the teachings of Plato and Christ, and believed so strongly in it that he said, "the Platonic teaching...is related to the divine law of both Moses and Christ as the moon is to the sun." With this in mind, it may be said that the vision of Marsilio Ficino, so clearly manifested in this work, will come as a relief to anyone ardently devoted to the school of Plato and the religion of Christ. The translated works of Ficino are certainly a great benefit to those confined to the English speaking world, and the other up-and-coming volumes in new I Tatti Renaissance Library (Harvard) are likely to produce the same effects. The value of these newly translated masterpieces of western culture cannot be described. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0674003454
    Sales Rank: 227125
    Subjects:  1. History & Surveys - Ancient & Classical    2. Immortality    3. Philosophy    4. Plato    5. Religious    6. Soul    7. Theology   


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