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    Masons, Tricksters and Cartographers: Comparative Studies in the Sociology of Scientific and Indigenous Knowledge
    by David Turnbull
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 August, 2000)
    list price: $36.95 -- our price: $36.95
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    Reviews (1)

    5-0 out of 5 stars the shape of twentyfirst century thinking
    Professor Turnbull's particular speciality is the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge. This is a controversial field, since some argue that science (Western techno-Science) is objective truth itself and therefore can not be a subject for sociology whose subject is people.

    Turnbull shows that knowledge systems are always local human constructs. Masons building cathedrals without blueprints, Australian aborigines navigating across a trackless land through the dream-time, and western scientists engaged in turbulence research are a few of the examples of what he calls "knowledge spaces."

    While this is a textbook-and a very radical and bold one at that-Turnbull is a very clear writer. This isn't jargon wars, and the material presented is truly fascinating.

    David Turnbull evidently hails from down under. His excellent 1993 work "Maps are Territories: Science Is an Atlas" is available to us on amazon.com thanks to the University of Chicago Press. (This book, with its beautiful "Fool's Cap" world map, is from Holland).

    Turnbull argues for the validity and worth of all knowledge systems. We need science to deal with the problems science itself has created (nuclear waste, for example), but we need diversity of approach to deal with local problems and to understand what approaches other knowledge systems employ. Turnbull's examination of malaria vaccine research best demonstrates these issues.

    It's hard to stay calm while writing this review 'cause the book was just so exciting. Reading "Maps Are Territories..." might prepare the cartographically inclined for this witty and way deep book. ... Read more

    Isbn: 9058230015
    Sales Rank: 666000
    Subjects:  1. Anthropology - General    2. History    3. Social Science    4. Sociology    5. Cultural studies    6. Impact of science & technology on society   


    $36.95

    Maps are Territories : Science is an Atlas
    by David Turnbull
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (16 March, 1994)
    list price: $19.00 -- our price: $19.00
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    Reviews (1)

    5-0 out of 5 stars all over the map
    This book is all over the map, but what exactly does that mean?

    Turnbull begins with a quote, "...all theory may be regarded as a kind of map extended over space and time." (Michael Polanyi) How tempting to describe difficult concepts as "like a map." By page two we're dealing with Borges, and a page later Lewis Carroll. Maps are more complex than we ever imagined.

    The discussion of Aboriginal-Australian Maps (Exhibit 5) takes us deeper still, as we learn that their dream time and painting contain elements of geographical knowledge which these people equate with magic.

    Originally published in 1989, it remains way ahead of its time. Multicultural, lacking any cant, beautifully illustrated, intellectually exciting ... Read more

    Isbn: 0226817059
    Sales Rank: 380996
    Subjects:  1. Atlases - General    2. Australia    3. Cartography    4. Earth Sciences - Geography    5. Maps    6. Philosophy    7. Reference    8. Science / Geography   


    $19.00

    The Image of the World: 20 Centuries of World Maps
    by Peter Whitfield
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 March, 1999)
    list price: $25.00
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    Reviews (1)

    5-0 out of 5 stars modern maps aren't always better
    What a fetish we have made of accuracy and precision in maps! These maps--even the mediaevil ones showing the location of the Garden of Eden--are coherent world views. Many of the maps have been restored to their original look.
    Hard to know where to draw the line between art, science, religion and history. Excellent text. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0764903640
    Sales Rank: 798461
    Subjects:  1. Cartography    2. Maps    3. Reference    4. World - General   


    Atlas of World History
    by Patrick K. O'Brien
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (01 October, 1999)
    list price: $85.00 -- our price: $53.55
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    Reviews (9)

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Best World History Atlas Book Anywhere
    The Oxford Atlas is the best of all competitors. It is full-size, high quality ink and paper, 368 pages and covers most areas of history from the caveman to the present time. I am not speaking of the concise edition but of the full-size edition. The ISBN number is #0195215672.

    This book covers about 2,000,000 years of history from the origins of humanity to the year 2000. The Atlas is the result of over three years' work by internationally renowned cartographers, an expert editorial team and specialist academic consultants.

    5-0 out of 5 stars I Rate and Compare World History Atlas Books
    As a reader I like to have quick reference books at my finger tips including a new version of the Oxford English Dictionary about 3500 pages long - that I use almost daily. So I decided to add a "history atlas". In the process of doing my research I read the other amazon.com reviewers and then made three trips to two large book stores to actually look at the books and get a better feel for which was the best. I ended up buying the Oxford Atlas of World History. Here are my picks and rankings.

    Listed by My ranking, #1 is the best, #2 is a creative alternative but no substitute.

    1.Atlas of World History, Oxford University Press 2002, 368 pages, $57.80, 13.5" x 10.3" x 1.62" ranked 46,632 on Amazon.com. Hands down winner - professional - good text descriptions, outstanding maps and drawings, covers most things from the cave man forward. Negatives: Big and heavy. If you want to save a few dollars buy the "concise" version.

    2.Creative alternative: The Penguin Atlas of World History, Penguin Books 2004, $11.20, just a paperback sized, just published, 304 pages. Surprisingly impressive, lots of text and pictures mixed together and it is easy to carry around. A nice quick alternative but it will be printed in two volumes.
    .
    3.Timelines of World History, DK Publishing 2002, 666 pages, $27.20. 10.0" x 1.6" ranked 25,800 on Amazon.com. Second with lots of value but in some ways not as comprehensive.

    4. National Geographic Almanac of World History, National Geographic 2003, 384 pages, $28.00, 9.6" x 7.8" x 1.17" ranked 24,426 on Amazon.com. Similar to but less impressive than Oxford books. More text, narrower coverage, fewer maps and drawings.

    5.DK Atlas of World History, DK Publishing, 352 pages, $35.00, 10.96" x 14.66" x 1.28" ranked 10,716 on Amazon.com. My last place book seems like a giant comic book. I love the DK travel books but this seems like one step beyond DK's area of expertise. Superficially it is similar to the Oxford book and it is cheap, and some might like it but it tries to be politically correct and fails.

    6.Oxford Dictionary of World History, Oxford University Press, 704 pages, $7,66, pocketbook sized, sales rank 330,000. Mainly terms, people, and dates but has a few maps also. Limited use but an alternative. I prefer the new Penguin book but this is the best history dictionary to buy.

    Jack in Toronto

    5-0 out of 5 stars The story of humanity from a cartographic perspective
    The affordable price tag of this set of maps paired with its applications to both home and school library patrons will earn it a place on many a home bookshelf as well as libraries: Atlas Of World History, Concise Edition is the result of over three years of intensive effort by a team of academics and editors, and presents the story of humanity from a physical, cartographic perspective. Five parts correspond with the five eras studied by world historians today, making for a particularly accessible set of maps. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0195215672
    Sales Rank: 22286
    Subjects:  1. Atlases - General    2. Atlases - Historical    3. Earth Sciences - Geography    4. Historical Atlases    5. Historical geography    6. Maps    7. Reference   


    $53.55

    Another America: Native American Maps and the History of Our Land
    by Mark Warhus
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (01 April, 1997)
    list price: $29.95
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    Editorial Review

    The Europeans who conquered the Americas and their descendants were not the first to map the hemisphere, museum curator Mark Warhus writes in this fascinating, richly illustrated study of Native American cartography. Indian maps--made on buffalo skins, rocks, bark, and, later, paper--claimed territorial rights, explained treaties among nations, delineated trade routes, and showed the locations of resources. Many of those maps wound up in dusty attics and the back shelves of museums, where Warhus has hunted them out; his stories of finding these lost treasures are as illuminating as his interpretations of what might be called pre-scientific ways of graphically describing the land. These maps, he writes, are of importance today not only for their own sake, but also as evidence of historic holdings in current claims over lost territories. ... Read more

    Reviews (2)

    5-0 out of 5 stars can't seize the land before it's been described
    This is a story of dispossession and of cultural memory. Mark Warhus reveals an astonishing legacy of native American cartography. Most of the maps are snapshots of important moments in the collision of two cultures. Some of these maps are the absolute last artifacts of tribes who have disappeared, such as the maps of Shanawdithit (Nancy) the last surviving member of the Beothucks (or Red Indians of Newfoundland).

    Other maps demonstrate the deep ties to tribal lands once lost but more recently regained.

    Native American mapmaking is intertwined with oral history. Therefore, these maps are also historical treasures.

    5-0 out of 5 stars can't seize the land before it's been described
    This is a story of dispossession and of cultural memory. Mark Warhus reveals an astonishing legacy of native American cartography. Most of the maps are snapshots of important moments in the collision of two cultures. Some of these maps are the absolute last artifacts of tribes who have disappeared, such as the maps of Shanawdithit (Nancy) the last surviving member of the Beothucks (or Red Indians of Newfoundland).

    Other maps demonstrate the deep ties to tribal lands once lost but more recently regained.

    Native American mapmaking is almost indistinguishable from oral history. Therefore, these maps are also historical treasures. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0312150547
    Subjects:  1. Geographical perception    2. Historical Atlases    3. History    4. Indian cartography    5. Indians of North America    6. Maps    7. Native American    8. Native Americans - History    9. North America    10. Sociology   


    Lies My Teacher Told Me : Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong
    by James W. Loewen
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (03 September, 1996)
    list price: $15.00 -- our price: $10.20
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    Reviews (283)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Keeping children in a bubble
    The title is a bit of a misnomer. The real title should be `Omissions in Twelve History Textbooks'. At this point most Americans know that George Washington and Thomas Jefferson had slaves but few probably realize than Patrick "Give me liberty or give me death" Henry also owned slave. It's no secret that Columbus was unkind to indigenous people but the depth of his brutality is still shocking. Mr. Loewen kicks over the shiny stone of carefully crafted American mythology to reveal the mud and worms beneath. Beyond just glossing over character flaws many history books create such blandness as when several popular textbooks describe the debate between Lincoln and Stephen Douglas focusing on their attire and posture ignoring the content of their speeches.

    History books aren't simply glossing over details. They are omitting THE defining characteristic of American history that being the pursuit of hegemony, first continental then global. Without understanding the primary American foreign policy how can Americans understand why the U.S. would engage in the destabilization of democratically elected governments and assassinations of leaders?In Iran, for instance the United States helped to overthrow PM Massadegh and install the despised and oppressive shah. This kind of stuff happens all the time particularly in Central and South America and the Middle East meanwhile uninformed Americans cry out `why do they hate us?'. The history books also omit causation as if things just happen as in `...and war broke out' as if war were a rash that occasionally flares up without reason. History is about causation and context and students are taught neither,

    The central problem, as Mr. Loewen points out, comes from the very structure of our education system. History is the most politically charged of all subjects in primary education. One person's hero is another person's heel. Northern states may prefer the term "Civil War" while Southerners prefer "War between the states" or even "War for southern independence". In order to satisfy all potential markets history books are written bland like elevator music neither castigating true villainy nor celebrating actual heroes. The good news is that history books have improved to some extent although it's more a reflection of changing attitudes in society and acceptance of some of the more unpalatable details of our past.

    What impressed me the most about this book was how complete it is. While I was reading the book I thought about related topics and before the book was over Mr. Loewen ended up touching on each one. For instance he mentions the absurd afro-centrism which was intended to empower young blacks but instead credited blacks with creating everything good while whites were left creating only slavery and theft. The book also mentions the various right wing groups that unashamedly work towards creating a sanitized history. He even mentions Lynne Cheney by name. Meanwhile in an age where information is increasingly accessible it's becoming quite naïve to believe that students can be kept in bubble. Instead students are becoming cynical and disinterested which may explain why teaching history is often being relegated to gym teachers.

    4-0 out of 5 stars A Treat to Read
    A nice critique on american educational history and the lies distortions and falsifications that are inherent in the pages of our childrens history books. The author makes no bones about it, history taught as it currently is, is boring, over-simplified, mostly always with a happy go lucky ending of events. The real object was to, of course make those on top appear better, more knowlegeable than the evidence shows...Loewan does a good job with correcting some of the distortions and at the same time he offers suggestions on how to improve the teaching of the subject,by replacing misrepresented history with historical information more closely aligned with the truth is a first step. No wonder revisionist history is so popular, it is so much fun discoveringthat everyone contributed to the planet!!!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Very worth reading...I promise you will learn something new
    Many other reviewers have complained about the author's bias in the book.And it is quite true that Loewen has strong leftist leanings and that these leanings come through.

    It's still an excellent book, because even though his opinions are present, his complaints about the books and his suggestions for improving them are all based in fact.He footnotes everything and references respectable sources.You might disagree with his opinions, but his facts are well-argued and persuasive.You may or may not agree with his leanings, but amongst his opinions are a lot more facts, and those facts clearly indicate serious problems with our history curriculum.

    If the history curriculum literally lies or seriously deceives (for example, saying the US government "challenged" someone whom we actually assassinated), that's a problem, no matter what political leanings you may have. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0684818868
    Sales Rank: 319
    Subjects:  1. Historiography    2. History    3. History - General History    4. History: American    5. Indians of North America in te    6. Indians of North America in textbooks    7. Study & Teaching    8. Textbooks    9. Thanksgiving Day in textbooks    10. United States    11. United States - General    12. United States History (General)    13. Education / General   


    $10.20

    Salival [CD/VHS]
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Audio CD (12 December, 2000)
    list price: $24.98
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    Features

    • Explicit Lyrics
    • Live
    Reviews (24)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Salival salvation
    This CD/VHS set was a stop gap between 'Aenima' and 'Lateralus', and consists of a CD featuring live and rare tracks, as well as a video containing the bands ambitious, biazzare and at times grotesque music videos (now sadly out dated due to the release of videos from the 'Lateralus' album). This is an essential live document for Tool fans, for the versions of some of the songs featured here surpass the originals in places. The live version of 'Third Eye', the 13 minute epic from 'Aenima' is imbued with far more atmosphere than the original, has a different sample at the start (Timothy Leary on freedom of thought), and is simply required listening for fans. 'Pushit' is also revamped, with a slower, more thoughtful opening, lengthy bong-drum interlude and alternative lyrics. Elsewhere on the disc, we have 'Part of Me' live, which is the discs weak point, as one feels a better song could have been selected for inclusion. Also, the song is very little changed from the studip recording: hardly a new criticism of live material, but when viewed against the quality of the other material here it is a severe defect. A version of Led Zeppelin's 'No Quarter' surfaces finally here, which is thankful, as Tool do a fine job of making the classic song their own. A cover of 'You Lied' by Peach (Justin Chancellor's previous outfit) is very welcome, as is the hidden track towards the end of the album, which I would urge the listener to discover for themselves. Overall the disc is very strong.
    The VHS suffers immediately from being out of date, but this does not diminish the quality of the videos included. For those who have never seen a Tool video I am unable to explain their merits here: Adam Jones is evidently a genius in my eyes, but the nightmare imagery is unlikely to appeal to everyone.
    This is an essential commodity for Tool fans, but for the casual listener there will be very little of interest here. For this reason I do recommend this set highly, but only to the initiated.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Average DVD/CD
    The music videos are all great. I wish there were some live footage, because the visuals are awesome at Tool shows, but oh well. As for the album, "Push It" is the only real gem. The two other live songs taken from previous albums are great, but too much like the album versions (well, "Third Eye" has no cussing, so you can play it for grandma without feeling dirty). "You Lied" and "No Quarter" are rather boring, and "Merkaba" is just plain annoying. The filler tracks are really idiotic, although "LAMC" exctracts several laughts now and then. The hidden track is some... recording that Tool did when they were younger, but the ending is pretty hillarious. There are better CD's you could get with the same ammount of money, such as The Fragile by Nine Inch Nails, or Is There Anybody Out There? (The Wall live) by Pink Floyd, but if you want this, go ahead and buy it. Oh yeah, and the art book rocks!

    5-0 out of 5 stars AAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHH
    Proves well beyond a shadow of a doubt that Tool is the greatest band in the history of the galaxy and the best that ever will be.This album demonstrates what it's like to be at a live show.The songs, no singles (no "Sober" for you fratboy wannabes, sorry) are absolutely stunning.The covers, especially "No Quarter" are difficult to describe in words.Go buy this and enhance your thinking (wink, wink). ... Read more

    Asin: B0000541I3
    Sales Rank: 19017
    Subjects:  1. Alternative Metal    2. Heavy Metal    3. Pop    4. Rock   


    Aenima
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Audio CD (01 October, 1996)
    list price: $18.98 -- our price: $13.99
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    Editorial Review

    With its heavy-duty distortion, weighty rhythms, and cynical lyrics, Tool is a heavy metal band for the '90s. Rather like Metallica circa ...And Justice for All, the sound is focused heavily on texture, with vocals and guitars layered one atop the other, and heart-pounding drums underlying everything. There's not a whole lot of variety on Tool's second full-length album--most of the songs start off fairly low-key, kicking into high gear for the chorus, and repeat--but Maynard James Keenan's distinctive voice, the prog-rock stylings over a heavy metal base, and a supremely unhealthy dose of vitriol make this the perfect album to bang your head to. --Genevieve Williams ... Read more

    Features

    • Explicit Lyrics
    Reviews (987)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Amazing, intriguing, thought-provoking. The best.
    This isn't just the best metal album ever made. In my opinion it's the best album ever made, all categories. I felt I had to write something and try to contribute towards the 5 stars overall this album deserves. I don't blame the people who gave it one star, it's their opinion, and maybe this album isn't for everyone. First of all, you have to like music. Second, you should like metal. Third, you should be enough interested in life and like the medium of music to express aspects of life. I have owned this album for seven years and it still grows. I can still cry listening to it, just because of the beauty, the pure energy this album conveys. A masterpiece, from the first second to the last. A lesson in life.

    1-0 out of 5 stars I'll have a Maynard James Keenan with pilau rice, thanks!
    Whoa! Everyone seems to have an opinion on this. Tool fans seem to go out of their way to convince the casual buyer that this record is the work of absolute genius, and that it will change you life etc. Being a rather naïve and gullible individual I decided to give the album a whirl. I lay down, put my headphones on and prepared to be swept up in the brilliance that is tool and left drooling. Well, I fell asleep but I tried I really did! It's just this album is so monotonous!
    A song about fisting? Yeah, I know it supposed to have a whole *deeper meaning*, but its still stupid, not to mention bloody painful. The five star reviewers make this album out to be intensely thought provoking and some even go as far by saying that it's so hard to comprehend that only a select few will grasp the true meaning. That's a load of codswallop! You don't have to be really intelligent to get this, there's nothing to get, its just pretentious whining. Albeit twisted to make it into *music for pseudo intellectuals*. I'd rather listen to korn, at least they're straight forward about it.
    Tool fans are quick to insult the average human being for disliking their favorite band by dismissing them as ignorant twits. No, it's just the music is so dull I'm sure over exposure is enough to make anyone brain dead for a little while. My brain cells came out waving a white flag about half way through. I had to listen to skinny puppy to perk them back up again. In a way, tool fans remind me of born again Christians, as in you're either a blind follower or a total waste of space. It's like a cult. Perhaps that's the appeal. Does being a tool fan make you better then other people? If you think so then you are a sad, sad person. Perhaps you think my tiny brain just can't grasp the fact that tool are the best band in the world and that Maynard James Keenan (sounds like an Indian dish) is a god. Personally I think he's laughing his wig off at all of you. But anyway you can't be swayed. To the curious buyer, I'd listen to the samples and look up some of the lyrics before you start believing all the hype. By the way I just want to say the `secretary' from Boston is a plagiarizer. (...)Oh and one more thing. If Maynard James Keenan moved to Spain and (under Spanish law) married Pilar Gòmez Dìaz, her name would remain Pilar Gòmez Dìaz. If they had a daughter christened Mercedes, she will be called Mercedes James Gòmez. If she got married to Juan García Martìnez she would keep her original name but her son, Pedro, would be called Perdro García James. You see where this could go! Having such a long winded name is a danger to Spanish society!
    Have you just read all that? If you have, you now know what listening to a tool album feels like. It's simple and easy to understand but presented in such a difficult and presumptuous way, that it just gets annoying and unnecessarily tedious after a while.

    4-0 out of 5 stars great album
    Ænima, first of all, is hard to understand. Not story wise..what have you. It's a album that you can take in as a whole and see the incredibly long songs and tracks that mean nothing to the album (Useful idiot) and be disgusted by it. But you have to pretty much break down the tracks and digest it slowly to take on this new feel to it. It's a really great and heartfelt album. The kind of stuff Maynard USE to make. Anyway..I mainly made this comment to correct something that somebody said as a comment..and I quote:
    "They are simply carbon copies of so many other nu-metal and alternative metal acts. Some synonyms for the word "Tool":
    NIN, Filter, Deftones, System of a Down, Korn, Drowning Pool, Disturbed, etc...(Shall I go on? I can.)"

    Disturbed's first album came out in 2000. Tool's Ænima came out in 1996..any questions? Drowning Pool: to quote MTV "one of the most anticipated bands of the early 2000's"....once again..Ænima came out in 1996. So, of course, it makes perfect sense that Tool is a copy of bands that came out much later than them because they're all time travelers and can see what's big ahead of time. Sorry, but that had to be said because you are not well educated in music. Peace out
    ... Read more

    Asin: B00000099Y
    Subjects:  1. Pop    2. Rock   


    $13.99

    Labyrinths: Selected Stories and Other Writings (New Directions Paperbook, 186)
    by Jorge Luis Borges, James E. Irby, Donald A. Yates
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 June, 1964)
    list price: $13.95 -- our price: $11.16
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Editorial Review

    If Jorge Luis Borges had been a computer scientist, he probably would have invented hypertext and the World Wide Web.

    Instead, being a librarian and one of the world's most widely read people, he became the leading practitioner of a densely layered imaginistic writing style that has been imitated throughout this century, but has no peer (althoughUmberto Eco sometimes comes close, especially inName of the Rose).

    Borges's stories are redolent with an intelligence, wealth of invention, and a tight, almost mathematically formal style that challenge with mysteries and paradoxes revealed only slowly after several readings. Highly recommended to anyone who wants their imagination and intellect to be aswarm with philosophical plots, compelling conundrums, and a wealth of real and imagined literary references derived from an infinitely imaginary library. ... Read more

    Reviews (37)

    5-0 out of 5 stars This is what M.C. Escher would have writen...
    ...had he chosen the literary medium instead.

    For me, this book is serving as an introduction to Jorge Luis Borges' works and boy, oh boy, will there be more purchases to be made once I'm done with it.

    "Labyrinths", I understand, is a loose collection of short stories (apparently he didn't write many long ones) and some literary essays.

    It's a book that's teeming with big ideas and always happy to explore paradoxes (almost everything is a tip of the hat to Zeno's famous paradoxes regarding time and space) and one of the literary essays deals directly with Zeno's influence on people like Kafka, and interestingly enough, Kafka's influence on the past.

    It's probably not a book everyone will enjoy but if you are the kind of person who loves ideas and philosophy you will treasure it.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Beautiful Order that begets philosophical confusion
    Borges is one of the most seductive writers ever to have put ink to paper.This book of selected short stories and essays abounds in philosophical insight and creative brilliance.Borges knew how to take a simple theme and turn it round in one's head until what seemed once good and desirable now seems repugnant and nauseating and the desired effect is a seduction of one's own life.I am thinking particularly about a story called "The Immortal."These stories are densely packed with thought and thus they are wondrously stimulating.I know of only one other work that accomplishes something similar: Whyte's Antinomy.This is the kind of literature that never permits its reader to pry all of its meaning from its clutching grasp.I highly recommend this work of philosophical and literary brilliance.Read each story carefully and savor each moment.

    5-0 out of 5 stars "The Theme is Time"
    "'The future already exists,' I replied, 'but I am your friend'" (p 28).

    This slim volume, a select sampling of Borges' thought experiments translated into English, has literally inspired generations to the recognition that our way of insisting on our realities is not the only way to do so (to paraphrase Michel Foucault), or the best way to understand our daily lives. Borges, like Nietzsche, wraps apparently absurd ideas in such beautiful and convincing prose that the reader can't avoid a moment's reflection, perhaps affirmation.But unlike Nietzsche, Borges doesn't want to convince you of his reality. He seems content instead to let you experience the styrofoam feel of The Consensus as you negotiate your assumptions and his presentation."A Garden of Forking Paths" is a terrific example of this, and my favorite story in this collection. Yes, it works in translation, even a dated translation.

    And you can see versions of Borges' strategy quoted in Foucault's The Order of Things, and adapted implicitly in Tarthang Tulku's Time, Space, and Knowledge. Have you read these in the future, present, or past? ... Read more

    Isbn: 0811200124
    Subjects:  1. 1899-    2. Argentina    3. Borges, Jorge Luis,    4. Caribbean & Latin American    5. Fiction    6. Literature - Classics / Criticism    7. Social life and customs    8. Translations into English   


    $11.16

    General in His Labyrinth, The (Penguin Great Books of the 20th Century)
    by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, EdithGrossman
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 September, 1991)
    list price: $13.95 -- our price: $13.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Reviews (26)

    1-0 out of 5 stars Distressingly soporific
    I have a feeling that Gabo should have just let Alvaro Mutis sit on this project.Gabriel Garcia Marquez, author of at least three (really entertaining and pleasurable) masterpieces of fiction (One Hundred Years of Solitude, Love in the Time of Cholera, and the short stories of Strange Pilgrims), seems to have entered into a lull during the writing of The General in His Labyrinth.The best expression I can think of to classify this book is "distressingly soporific".The General (Simon Bolivar) always seems to be lying in the "aguas depurativas de la bañera" and the story moves as slowly as an old man's body (with apology to agile old men).There's barely a climax, and you were expecting it anyway: Bolivar dies.Meanwhile, Bolivar reflects on his political experiences and rather libertine love life, and treks with his entourage into exile.If you haven't read a lot of Garcia Marquez, try his masterpieces, and then his deep and satisfying memoir (Living to Tell the Tale), and don't bother with The General in his Labyrinth.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Couldn't get through it
    I tried and tried to keep reading this book, but it wasn't interesting to me.The General was a pathetic old man who seemed to be living a life of self pity.I got tired of his whining.I know Gabriel Garcia Marquez is very respected for his writing, but I just couldn't get into it.I guess I prefer books that I feel I have something to learn or are atleast entertaining.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A moving, underappreciated book
    What struck me most about the book is what a rich, all-encompassing view of The Liberator it presents. Marquez never flinches as he catalogs the contradictory deeds and impulses that make up every human being.We learn that the General sleeps with young girls and that his unknown sins are so objectionable the priest to whom Bolivar confesses refuses to preside over hisservices. But we also learn of the General's self-destructive generosity and the dream of a united Latin American for which he vainly gave his life. Marquez never tries to resolve these inconsistencies; instead, he trusts the reader to be intelligent and mature enough to recognize the complexities of the General as universal.Because the book focuses on a narrow slice of time--the last 6 months or so of the General's life--this intricate, thoughtful character study is also a meditation on our inability to confront death and the colossal failures that dot every life. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0140148590
    Sales Rank: 301101
    Subjects:  1. 1783-1830    2. Bolivar, Simon    3. Bolâivar, Simâon,    4. Fiction    5. Fiction - General    6. Literary    7. Fiction / General   


    $13.95

    Pan Am : An Airline and it's Air
    by R.E.G. DAVIES
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (17 October, 1990)
    list price: $41.95
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France
    Reviews (3)

    5-0 out of 5 stars passing of a jet age icon
    Pan Am was an American icon. In a short span, Juan Trippe established the inter-American air system and most of the airline's of Latin America. The acquisition of landing rights, mail contracts, aircraft, navigational aids, landing fields, not to mention the backing of moneyed friends--Juan Trippe had it all, or made sure he got it.
    The book is organized around the various aircraft and route systems of Pan American. The aircraft drawings and photographs are oustanding, and the book is beautiful in its white slip cover.

    5-0 out of 5 stars passing of a jet age icon
    Pan Am was an American icon. In a short span, Juan Trippe established the inter-American air system and most of the airline's of Latin America. The acquisition of landing rights, mail contracts, aircraft, navigational aids, landing fields, not to mention the backing of moneyed friends--Juan Trippe had it all, or made sure he got it.
    The book is organized around the various aircraft and route systems of Pan American. The aircraft drawings and sphotographs are oustanding, and the book is beautiful in its white slip cover.

    5-0 out of 5 stars passing of a jet age icon
    Pan Am was an American icon. In a short span, Juan Trippe established the inter-American air system and most of the airline's of Latin America. The acquisition of landing rights, mail contracts, aircraft, navigational aids, landing fields, not to mention the backing of moneyed friends--Juan Trippe had it all, or made sure he got it.
    The book is organized around the various aircraft and route systems of Pan American. The aircraft drawings and photographs are oustanding, and the book is beautiful in its white slip cover. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0517057247
    Sales Rank: 3013229
    Subjects:  1. Bargain Books    2. Non-Classifiable    3. Nonfiction - General   


    The Confidence-Man: His Masquerade (Oxford World's Classics)
    by Herman Melville, Tony Tanner
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 September, 1999)
    list price: $9.95 -- our price: $9.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Reviews (3)

    5-0 out of 5 stars What is he really saying?
    The book was fascinating, but not nearly so much as the different opinions about the book and its meaning.

    And so here is my theory: The Confidence Man is not a shape-shifter. In fact, there is no character in the book we could call the Confidence Man. The con is within ourselves, an intrinsic part of our natures. We are not conned we con ourselves. Perhaps best illustrated in the part where Melville talks about writing.

    In the end, how do you choose the outcome? You will take a walk in the dark, whether it be with faith or fear.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Never more true than in 2002
    No other Melville novel reminds me more of William Gaddis than The Confidence-Man: His Masquerade. In other words, Melville's corrosive yet understated, quintessentially American apocalypse is not an easy read but it rewards the attentive reader.Since I first read it I've never heard the word "confidence" spoken without re-experiencing something of Melville's irony.(And I've been reminded of that irony more frequently recently because the word has seems to have become a great favorite of our own president!)Melville's ironic sense, sharper here than in any of his other novels, shines in wonderfully wrought sentences. Such as:

    "[H]e seemed to have courted oblivion, a boon not often withheld from so humble an applicant as he."(Chapter 2)

    And, "Gradually overtaken by slumber, his flaxen head drooped, his whole lamb-like figure relaxed, and half reclining against the ladder's foot, lay motionless, as some sugar-snow in March, which, softly stealing down over night, with its white placidity startles the brown farmer peering out from his threshold at daybreak."(Chapter 1)

    And, "[O]ne of those who, at three-score-and-ten, are fresh-hearted as at fifteen; to whom seclusion gives a boon more blessed than knowledge, and at last sends them to heaven untainted by the world, because ignorant of it; just as a countryman putting up at a London inn, and never stirring out of it as a sight-seer, will leave London at last without once being lost in its fog or soiled by its mud."(Chapter 45)

    5-0 out of 5 stars story about story-telling
    His contemporaries just did not get it, but then Melville's great works were all written on the eve of the Civil War. Race, region and property were tearing the country apart, and this coming storm is the setting for this April Fool's Day ride on the Mississippi.
    The works of Mark Twain are dogged with controversy. In Innocents Abroad, for example, a simple discussion of Lake Como leads to a discussion of Lake Tahoe, leading to a racist tirade against the Washoe tribe of Nevada. (This would be a tame example.) Perhaps we cannot understand the times apart from Twain's Indian-hating.
    In The Confidence Man, Melville gives us a whole chapter on Indian-hating. It is a story about story-telling above all else; yet, it also takes us into the minds of Melville's contemporaries.
    Samuel Clemens was a great comic writer, and his greatest works remain important historical documents as well as entertaining fictions. Race dogs them, but Melville transcended this problem. In Black Guinea we sense the rich language of American blacks, and we are given a glance at the many levels on which it operates.
    When Black Guinea tries to defend himself, he says "dis poor ole darkie is werry well wordy of all you kind ge'mmen's kind confidence." Worthy or wordy, or maybe both? Herman Melville is in control of just about every word in this book.
    Moby Dick is adventure; The Confidence Man is entertainment. It puts you into a place that only story-telling knows. Liking puns helps. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0192837621
    Sales Rank: 85187
    Subjects:  1. American - General    2. Classics    3. Literary Criticism    4. Literature - Classics / Criticism    5. Literature: Classics    6. 19th century fiction    7. USA   


    $9.95

    Hammond New Century World Atlas
    by Hammond World Atlas Corporation
    Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (01 September, 1999)
    list price: $19.95 -- our price: $19.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Reviews (2)

    1-0 out of 5 stars This one's going back
    The atlas is incomplete. It is missing maps of many areas. The design is haphazard, the index lacks many of the places in the atlas, and I can't see many cities and features becasue they are down inside the binding.

    4-0 out of 5 stars can never have enough atlasses
    This is not my favorite atlas, but it is recent, reasonably priced and complete. I bought it because none of my other atlasses had useful maps of east-central Africa, Rwanda and Burundi, especially.
    Hammond has some proprietary projections in the Atlas. Unfortunately, there is no map of Eurasia. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0843713569
    Sales Rank: 1156867
    Subjects:  1. Atlases    2. Atlases - General    3. Atlases - World    4. Earth Sciences - Geography    5. Reference   


    $19.95

    Mapping
    by David Greenhood
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (15 February, 1964)
    list price: $27.50 -- our price: $27.50
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Reviews (4)

    3-0 out of 5 stars Simple introduction to maps and map-reading
    This book is a simple introduction to maps and map-reading.It is divided into two parts: getting the most out of maps, and making your own.In the first part, getting the most out of maps, Greenhood goes over the basics of how to orient yourself on a map, explaining coordinate systems, latitude, longitude, scale and direction.He then turns to content, and tells us how streams, rivers, roads, mountains, and elevations are represented on maps, including a discussion of topography.This section closes with a lengthy chapter on projections where Greenhood points out the difficulty of representing a spherical reality on a flat surface and goes on to enumerate all the various ways this problem has been addressed over the centuries.

    In the second part of the book, Greenhood gives practical advice for amateur map makers.He describes triangulation methods used by surveyors to accurately record the features of the landscape.He also includes a chapter covering tools and equipment helpful for making maps (such as sharp pencils).

    The language of the text is quite simple, appropriate perhaps for middle-schoolers.For example, when explaining the need for projections, he writes "Nobody now wants a flat earth any more than he wants a flat tire.But we must have flat maps.Flat maps with round meanings."Some of the points are made repeatedly in different parts of the same chapter.Greenhood does not assume that readers will have a strong background in math-some high school geometry should suffice.The level of the content is very basic, and readers with any experience in orienteering will likely find much of the material too basic.On the other hand, for readers with no experience at all in using maps, this book may prove a decent place to start.The Appendix includes a variety of useful tidbits, from metric conversion tables, to conversion of compass points to degrees, to scaling factors.There is also an index.

    4-0 out of 5 stars chattier than Erwin Raisz
    This is a nice intro to map reading. Less historical and theoretical than Erwin Raisz' contemporary "General Cartography," the book remains chockfull of mappy stuff.

    Greenhood and Raisz are of the WWII generation, when map making and map reading became practical issues of worldwide proportion. They're dated. It's not that technology has dated these books, for all the whohaw of the digital revolution. They're just pre- post-modern.

    Post-modern cartography is about deconstruction. Western mapmaking is far from neutral and value-free.

    Sometimes, the naivite of those times makes you chuckle. Neither of these books could be written today, despite their essential truth and wisdom. David Greenhood tries to provide us amateur cartographers with the basic tools we need to begin map-making. He is chatty and likes to make wry little professorial comments.

    I gave it only four stars because you have to do all the deconstructing yourself to make use of it in the twentyfirst century.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Bible of map reading!
    This book is a great reference tool.I used it in my cartography courses at school and still use at work.I help teach many people to read maps, and often refer to this book to help explain complex ideas in layman's terms.I recommend this book to anyone who wants to understand how to both read and create maps.

    Jennifer Barry
    Cartographer ... Read more

    Isbn: 0226306976
    Sales Rank: 760720
    Subjects:  1. Earth Sciences - Geography    2. Map drawing    3. Maps    4. Science    5. Science/Mathematics    6. Science / Geography   


    $27.50

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