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Books - Science - Mathematics - Number Systems - Books for Sequence Fans

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The Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences
by N. J.A. Sloane, Simon Plouffe
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
Hardcover (15 January, 1995)
list price: $75.00 -- our price: $75.00
(price subject to change: see help)
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Reviews (5)

5-0 out of 5 stars Searching for the book vs. the disk?
The Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences is available in three formats.Sellers often incorrectly match the ISBN to the format.It may be helpful to know the ISBN, rather than to rely on the results of a search by Title/Author.

Hardcover Book: ISBN 0125586302
Macintosh Disk:ISBN 0125586310
MSDOS/IBM Disk:ISBN 0125586329

Also, use the price as a clue to which item you will be receiving - the book sells for $70+, the disk for under $20.

5-0 out of 5 stars Searching for the book vs. the disk?
The Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences is available in three formats.Sellers often incorrectly match the ISBN to the format.It may be helpful to know the ISBN, rather than to rely on the results of a search using Title/Author.

Hardcover Book: ISBN 0125586302
Macintosh Disk:ISBN 0125586310
MSDOS/IBM Disk:ISBN 0125586329

Also, use the price as a clue to which item you will be receiving - the book sells for [$]+, the disk for under [$].

1-0 out of 5 stars This is a data disk, not the book
This product is not the Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences as it is portrayed here on Amazon; it is instead an almost useless data disk.The integer sequences are there all right, in lexicograhic order;but they are completely unidentified (except for a code number keyed to the book)!In other words, without the book this very expensive diskette is useless.

Basically I consider this to be false advertising.Do not buy it unless you already have the book and want a machine-readable, searchable copy of the sequences. ... Read more

Isbn: 0125586302
Sales Rank: 1004386
Subjects:  1. Algebraic Number Theory    2. Computer Science    3. Differential Equations    4. Mathematics    5. Number Systems    6. Number Theory    7. Numbers, Natural    8. Science/Mathematics    9. Sequences (Mathematics)    10. Psychology & Psychiatry / General   


$75.00

Sphere Packings, Lattices and Groups (Grundlehren der mathematischen Wissenschaften)
by John Horton Conway, Neil J. A. Sloane
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
Hardcover (07 December, 1998)
list price: $99.00 -- our price: $77.18
(price subject to change: see help)
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Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars The book on lattice
This book is devoted to the subject of lattice packings. It is an outstanding book with all pages interesting. It acts as a reference on the subjects of lattices. What you will find:
--Sphere packings, ie the problem of packing spheres in order to maximize density.
--The problem of Kissin numbers: maximize the number of adjacent sphere to a given sphere in a lattice
--Code, design, and Groups
--Error correcting codes
--Leech lattice
--Integral quadratic forms
--Voronoi cell
--many, many other subjects
What you WON'T find in this book:
--The study of Delaunay cells (or holes, L-polytopes) is quite limited
--The study of continuous families of lattice is not done, you won't find the Voronoi memoires here
--There is just one page on computational aspects of lattice

Nevertheless this book is excellent ... Read more

Isbn: 0387985859
Sales Rank: 648522
Subjects:  1. Algebra - General    2. Combinatorics    3. Finite groups    4. Lattice Theory    5. Mathematics    6. Number Theory    7. Science/Mathematics    8. Sphere packings    9. Mathematics / Group Theory   


$77.18

Enumerative Combinatorics: Volume 1
by Gian-Carlo Rota, Richard P. Stanley, B. Bollobas, W. Fulton, A. Katok, F. Kirwan, P. Sarnak, B. Simon
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
Paperback (May, 2000)
list price: $34.99 -- our price: $34.99
(price subject to change: see help)
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Reviews (4)

5-0 out of 5 stars A Masterpiece on Enumerative Combinatorics
I agree with the other reviewers.The book is a masterpiece on enumerative combinatorics.However, I am not so sure that it is a good book for a beginner.If you are a beginner, then you should read another book first, like John Riordan's book on "Combinatorial Analysis."Stanley's book is best suited for an advanced student who has a high level of mathematical mental maturity.The reason I say this is that in a few places Stanley's formalism, which is entirely appropriate for professional exposition, actually obscures the underlying simplicity of the mathematical ideas.We have all seen this in research papers, where a mathematician takes a trivial idea and "obsures" the underlying simplicity with too much formalism.However, for an advanced student, the book has a high density of important ideas and methods.

5-0 out of 5 stars This is for people who likes to COUNT
Gosh! This is for people who count, what else does a combinatorist do? Before people dismiss me as somebody who don't know hoot about math: I took a class with Prof. Stanley (the author) in college, and I had actually used vol 1 as a text. The material is highbrow (I agree on the 'hardcore' math observation) but the main theme of the book is how to 'count' -- needless to say not in the sense of everyday counting, but in the sense that 'topology' is 'coffee-to-donut transformation' and 'analysis' is 'honors calculus'. You have to know how to count, and comfortable with combinatorial proof to actually learn from this. I like the fact that Prof. Stanley asks for combinatorial proof to some known results, marking them as unsolved -- he really elevates the status of combinatorial proof, a method many dismiss as 'handwaving'. There is a number given to each exercise, according to the level of difficulty: [1] for trivial, [5] unsolved. I saw a professor who worked in differential topology for 40 years refer to this book -- and first year undergrads thumbing through the pages for exercises marked [1] and [2] to solve in spare time. This is a book for all levels of mathematicians: I am sure even the armchair amateur mathematicians can grasp some of the materials after a hard day's thought. I dont see this book as any less than a definitive text on enumerative combinatiorics.

5-0 out of 5 stars People who like to COUNT?!? People who like hard-core math.
There was an earier review that claimed this book is for "people who like to count." That's a little silly. This book is a rigorous math text. And it's glorious. It's probably my favorite text. But it's not light reading at all.

I spent a semester actively reading and working on this book with my advisor. I read this book and worked on research, 50/50 split on my time. I got through 2.5 of the 4 chapters, and I'm damn proud of myself. It's a great book, but if you didn't know that 'enumerative' was for "people who like to count", you probably want a different text. ... Read more

Isbn: 0521663512
Sales Rank: 80946
Subjects:  1. Combinatorics    2. Discrete Mathematics    3. Functional Analysis    4. Mathematics    5. Theory Of Functions    6. Combinatorics & graph theory    7. Mathematics / General   


$34.99

Enumerative Combinatorics Volume 2
by Richard P. Stanley, Sergey Fomin, B. Bollobas, W. Fulton, A. Katok, F. Kirwan, P. Sarnak, B. Simon
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
Paperback (15 February, 2001)
list price: $42.99 -- our price: $30.35
(price subject to change: see help)
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France
Reviews (4)

5-0 out of 5 stars A Masterpiece on Enumerative Combinatorics
I agree with the other reviewers.The book is a masterpiece on enumerative combinatorics.However, I am not so sure that it is a good book for a beginner.If you are a beginner, then you should read another book first, like John Riordan's book on "Combinatorial Analysis."Stanley's book is best suited for an advanced student who has a high level of mathematical mental maturity.The reason I say this is that in a few places Stanley's formalism, which is entirely appropriate for professional exposition, actually obscures the underlying simplicity of the mathematical ideas.We have all seen this in research papers, where a mathematician takes a trivial idea and "obsures" the underlying simplicity with too much formalism.However, for an advanced student, the book has a high density of important ideas and methods.

5-0 out of 5 stars This is for people who likes to COUNT
Gosh! This is for people who count, what else does a combinatorist do? Before people dismiss me as somebody who don't know hoot about math: I took a class with Prof. Stanley (the author) in college, and I had actually used vol 1 as a text. The material is highbrow (I agree on the 'hardcore' math observation) but the main theme of the book is how to 'count' -- needless to say not in the sense of everyday counting, but in the sense that 'topology' is 'coffee-to-donut transformation' and 'analysis' is 'honors calculus'. You have to know how to count, and comfortable with combinatorial proof to actually learn from this. I like the fact that Prof. Stanley asks for combinatorial proof to some known results, marking them as unsolved -- he really elevates the status of combinatorial proof, a method many dismiss as 'handwaving'. There is a number given to each exercise, according to the level of difficulty: [1] for trivial, [5] unsolved. I saw a professor who worked in differential topology for 40 years refer to this book -- and first year undergrads thumbing through the pages for exercises marked [1] and [2] to solve in spare time. This is a book for all levels of mathematicians: I am sure even the armchair amateur mathematicians can grasp some of the materials after a hard day's thought. I dont see this book as any less than a definitive text on enumerative combinatiorics.

5-0 out of 5 stars People who like to COUNT?!? People who like hard-core math.
There was an earier review that claimed this book is for "people who like to count." That's a little silly. This book is a rigorous math text. And it's glorious. It's probably my favorite text. But it's not light reading at all.

I spent a semester actively reading and working on this book with my advisor. I read this book and worked on research, 50/50 split on my time. I got through 2.5 of the 4 chapters, and I'm damn proud of myself. It's a great book, but if you didn't know that 'enumerative' was for "people who like to count", you probably want a different text. ... Read more

Isbn: 0521789877
Sales Rank: 348283
Subjects:  1. Combinatorics    2. Functional Analysis    3. General    4. Mathematics    5. Science/Mathematics    6. Theory Of Functions    7. Combinatorics & graph theory    8. Mathematics / General   


$30.35

The Theory of Partitions (Cambridge Mathematical Library)
by George E. Andrews
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
Paperback (28 July, 1998)
list price: $37.99 -- our price: $37.99
(price subject to change: see help)
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Reviews (3)

2-0 out of 5 stars Disappointing
Based on other Amazon reviews I had hopes of breezing through this book.But some problems prevented this.1) Use of outdated symbols, including odd italic script letters some of which are unidentifiable, 2) poor organization of material with a complete lack of overview and a disordered approach, 3) a careless "note to self" style of writing, 4) zero examples to backup formulas.Considering that Euler started the ball rolling in the 1700's, and that the last famous breakthrough was by the long dead Hardy and Ramanujan, partition theory is mature enough to deserve a better book than this.

5-0 out of 5 stars Basic reference on partitions and q-series
This is *the* classic and most essential reference on the theory ofpartitions and related q-series written by the leading authority on thesubject. It requires almost no technical prerequisites, starts fromscratch, and proceeds in a very clear and orderly manner towards some ofthe more elaborate aspects of the subject. If you (plan to) work on thissubject, buy it.

The book was written in 1976, and as such does not coverthe more recent developments, though the bibliography has been updated (toa limited degree) for the current 1998 paperback edition. However, afterall these years, it remains *the* introduction to the subject (with thepossible exception of chapter 14 on computational methods, which isdefinitely outdated), and can be supplemented only by Gaspar and Rahman's'Basic Hypergeometric Series'. I taught a higher undergraduate level coursebased on chapters 1, 2, 3, 7 and 9, and my students definitely found thesechapters to be highly readable.

My one and only complaint is toCambridge University Press: Dover has shown that paperbacks can be producedin such a way that they can be opened completely flat without beingdamaged, and quite cheaply too. Why can't you adopt the same technology?

5-0 out of 5 stars A Classic
This is the bible for the theory of partitions ... Read more

Isbn: 052163766X
Sales Rank: 566918
Subjects:  1. Algebra - General    2. Combinatorial Analysis    3. Mathematics    4. Number Theory    5. Science/Mathematics    6. Theory Of Numbers    7. Analytic number theory    8. Mathematics / Number Theory   


$37.99

Concrete Mathematics: A Foundation for Computer Science (2nd Edition)
by Ronald L. Graham, Donald E. Knuth, Oren Patashnik
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
Hardcover (28 February, 1994)
list price: $64.99 -- our price: $51.45
(price subject to change: see help)
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Reviews (24)

3-0 out of 5 stars A pourry of combinatorics
I want to start saying that this is a book designed for Engineers, not for Mathematicians. It focuses on the tecniques, not on the arguments. This is not a book about combinatorics, it is a wide raging introduction (it lacks on definitions, and his proofs are a lot far away from mathematical ones). The Enegineers can use this book as a good reference. The Mathematicians can improve their lateral thinking, for them (well: us) it is book about problem-solving strategies.
I will never use this book as a textbook for a graduate/undergraduate course, it can be helpful if used with another book about combinatorics: when you study a combinatorial object, you can read from this book the techniques it involves.
The exercises are extremely exciting, when I read this book I spent a lot of time about its exercises (proportion read:solve = 1:3), and they led me to interesting results.

4-0 out of 5 stars Steep learning curve, the definitive prerequisite for TAOCP.
Why I got this book:
It's a great feeling to know how computers work, when I decided that I want to make a career and a life out of computers, as its truly a passion for me, I delved deeper, discovering the true beauty in the Science part of Computer Science, so I decided to get Donald Knuth' "The Art of Computer Programming" - to describe that seminal, huge work, it's like biting more than you can chew while trying to drink from a fire hose, moreover, the technical and mathematical prerequisites for the work are sometimes too demanding, they require a huge amount of experience with discrete mathematics, although I had some lectures and read some books, none came close "Concrete Mathematics", it covers, from ground up (though with a dangerously steep learning curve) a lot of discrete mathematics topics, it is by far the most extensive work I've read about Sums and really teaches the algorithmic problem solving thinking skill the authors preach so much about, with small amusing comments written by actual students of this course, a comfortable format, and very good writing skills, you can feel these guys are great professors who enjoy this material and are passionate about teaching it.

Recommended, though some better, less steep, introductionary text books are probably out there.

Enjoy.

3-0 out of 5 stars Only one problem with this textbook
Basically, I like this textbook. The material is interesting, the way the authors presented the material is inspiring, and they provided a lot of jokes to make even studying for exams not that boring. But there is one big problem which made me decided to rate this book only 3 stars instead of 5 stars: the authors like to use non-standard notations. For example: m\n means "m>0 and n=mk for some integer k". One of the worst thing in scientific world is writing things others cannot read, and the authors did this by introducing many strange notations. These things makes the good work sometimes almost unreadable. This is not computer systems in which we use "cp" for the copy command and "cd" for change directory command.

What a pity the authors did that. This textbook will be perfect without those strange notations.... ... Read more

Isbn: 0201558025
Sales Rank: 77594
Subjects:  1. Computer Bks - Languages / Programming    2. Computer Science    3. General    4. Mathematics    5. Programming Languages - General   


$51.45

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