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Books - History - Ancient - Greece - "Books to help write that novel about ancient Greece

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Greek Sculpture : An Exploration
by Andrew Stewart
Paperback (22 September, 1993)
list price: $65.00 -- our price: $54.38
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Isbn: 0300052081
Sales Rank: 647303
Subjects:  1. Art    2. Art & Art Instruction    3. Sculpture    4. Art / Sculpture   


$54.38

Greek Tragedy: A Literary Study
by H. D. F. Kitto
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
Paperback (01 October, 2002)
list price: $34.95 -- our price: $34.95
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Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent and insightful analysis of Greek Tragedy
Kitto has incredible insight into the meaning of Aeschylus', Sophocles' and Euripides' drama, which shows on every page of the book.Where other authors come tothe drama withtheir own agendas, and then ignoreor make excuses for anything in the plays which interferes with their "brilliant" analyses, Kitto develops analyses which address all important elements of virtually every extant play. ... Read more

Isbn: 0415289645
Sales Rank: 441345
Subjects:  1. Ancient and Classical    2. Literary Criticism    3. Literature - Classics / Criticism    4. Ancient (Classical) Greek    5. BCE to c 500 CE    6. Plays & playwrights: classical, early & medieval   


$34.95

The Victorious Youth (Getty Museum Studies on Art)
by Carol C. Mattusch
Paperback (01 April, 1998)
list price: $19.95 -- our price: $19.95
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Isbn: 089236470X
Sales Rank: 1364296
Subjects:  1. Ancient - Greece    2. Ancient Art    3. Art    4. Art & Art Instruction    5. Bronze sculpture    6. Bronze sculpture, Greek    7. Collectors and collecting    8. European    9. Expertising    10. Getty bronze    11. History - General    12. Rome    13. Sculpture   


$19.95

The Getty Bronze
by Jiri Frel
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
Paperback (01 August, 1982)
list price: $1.00 -- our price: $2.99
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Reviews (1)

4-0 out of 5 stars good book
This is a good book and quite interesting...if you like greek literature read this. It's definetly worth the wait! ... Read more

Isbn: 0892360399
Sales Rank: 1239028
Subjects:  1. American - General    2. Art    3. Art & Art Instruction    4. Bronze sculpture, Greek    5. California    6. Collections, Catalogs, Exhibitions - General    7. Getty bronze    8. Influence    9. Lysippus    10. Malibu    11. Sculpture   


$2.99

Reading Greek: Text (Reading Greek)
by Joint Association of Classical Teachers
Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
Paperback (02 November, 1978)
list price: $20.99 -- our price: $20.99
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Reviews (14)

3-0 out of 5 stars Good reading selections, patchy grounding
As other reviewers have noted, the series is ungainly and one needs to have a minimum of three of the books (text, grammar and vocabulary, reader's guide)and possibly a fourth (vocabulary alone)before going on to the intermediate reading selections, of which there are now three.

But more importantly the evident strengths of the series are mixed with equally important weakness.It's indeed exciting to begin to read simplified Greek text from the first lesson, within a very few to be reading only slightly adapted extracts from the great authors, and to end with original passages from Demosthenes, Euripides, Herodotus, and Homer.All the selections (quite a few from Aristophanes and Plato)and settings (adapted from Thucydides for the time of the plague in Athens) are fascinating and authentic.

On the other hand, there are at least two problems apart from the awkwardness of using three or four books together.After the first seven or eight lessons, the level of difficulty gets exponential not so much in absorbing, but in retaining the grammatical complexity.The exercises are just too few to be really helpful in this regard.By the time the student finishes the basic text, the base is insufficient to go on reading other texts with facility.

A second problem is the diffuseness of the texts: a smattering of many different styles and types of ancient Greek does not really provide focus.As the language kept evolving, with the simplest being the koine, it's perhaps a mistake not to start with grounding first in this form.Alternatively, much more emphasis on Homer could equally help provide a base from which to expand.The most difficult authors in some ways are in the classical Attic (Demosthenes, Aristophanes, Plato).Again, it could have been a better strategy, even keeping the focus only on these, to concentrate on say, Plato.

To sum up, my suggestion would be to use this series with some caution: It's quite effective to acquire some of the basics, and reading all the text in the first volume is certainly a satisfying experience.But for a more thorough base in ancient Greek, it may be better to: (i) master the koine of the New Testament; (ii) focus on Homeric Greek with Pharr's text; (iii) and, acquire depth in the Attic dialect with either of different texts which rely on a single author (Hansen's course uses extracts from Plato; in the older tradition, Mather and Hewitt provide the whole of Xenophon's Anabasis in an excellent, annotated version).

3-0 out of 5 stars Good reading selections, patchy grounding
As other reviewers have noted, the series is ungainly and one needs to have a minimum of three of the books (text, grammar and vocabulary, reader's guide)and possibly a fourth (vocabulary alone)before going on to the intermediate reading selections, of which there are now three.

But more importantly the evident strengths of the series are mixed with equally important weakness.It's indeed exciting to begin to read simplified Greek text from the first lesson, within a very few to be reading only slightly adapted extracts from the great authors, and to end with original passages from Demosthenes, Euripides, Herodotus, and Homer.All the selections (quite a few from Aristophanes and Plato)and settings (adapted from Thucydides for the time of the plague in Athens) are fascinating and authentic.

On the other hand, there are at least two problems apart from the awkwardness of using three or four books together.After the first seven or eight lessons, the level of difficulty gets exponential not so much in absorbing, but in retaining the grammatical complexity.The exercises are just too few to be really helpful in this regard.By the time the student finishes the basic text, the base is insufficient to go on reading other texts with facility.

A second problem is the diffuseness of the texts: a smattering of many different styles and types of ancient Greek does not really provide focus.As the language kept evolving, with the simplest being the koine, it's perhaps a mistake not to start with grounding first in this form.Alternatively, much more emphasis on Homer could equally help provide a base from which to expand.The most difficult authors in some ways are in the classical Attic (Demosthenes, Aristophanes, Plato).Again, it could have been a better strategy, even keeping the focus only on these, to concentrate on say, Plato.

To sum up, my suggestion would be to use this series with some caution: It's quite effective to acquire some of the basics, and reading all the text in the first volume is certainly a satisfying experience.But for a more thorough base in ancient Greek, it may be better to: (i) master the koine of the New Testament; (ii) focus on Homeric Greek with Pharr's text; (iii) and, acquire depth in the Attic dialect with either of different texts which rely on a single author (Hansen's course uses extracts from Plato; in the older tradition, Mather and Hewitt provide the whole of Xenophon's Anabasis in an excellent, annotated version).

4-0 out of 5 stars Tough going, but valuable
Before you buy into this book series, go clear off your desk.You're going to need a lot of space to spread out your Reading Greek library.

At a minimum, you will need two books: the "Text," which includes Greek readings with brief English introductions, and "Grammar, Vocabulary and Exercises," (GVE) which includes the actual pedagogical materials to guide you through the Text's readings.You'll need both books open at the same time to do your work.

Two books might not be enough if you're studying on your own.You will also want to pick up "An independent study guide to Reading Greek."This book gives slightly more in-depth discussion of the vocabulary and grammatical points covered in GVE, translations of the Text, and answers to the GVE exercises.And if you're teaching yourself, you can pick up "The teachers' notes to Reading Greek."This book gives tips on how to manage the materials in the two basic books.If you know a little Greek before you start, this book helps you figure out what strategy the authors are pursuing.

But you're not done.There's a thin "Greek vocabulary" that goes with the series.It provides all the vocabulary for the Text in one place.And there is a nice history of ancient Greece that complements the text, "The world of Athens."This book provides background on Greek culture, politics, and arts.The independent study guide cross-references sections in "The world" to chapters in the "Reading Greek" books.Very helpful when you come across a cultural reference and wonder what it means.

But wait--that's not all.If you can make it through all these books, there are two readers to continue your studies.One is an anthology of classic Greek texts, the other an introduction to the later, New Testament Greek.I hope someday to be in a position to make use of them.

One last thing.If you're like me and need to hear a language to learn it, you should listen to the audio tape that accompanies the series.Be warned that the audio quality is not so good.The recordings are rather noisy, making it hard to hear exactly how the speakers are pronouncing things.But since no one really knows how Attic Greek sounded, maybe you don't need to listen that closely.

Finally, concerning the value of the texts themselves: I find this series difficult to use, but worthwhile.In lesson one, the authors teach you the Greek alphabet and then drop you right into a seven page Greek story.(Perhaps the authors were inspired by that girl in Nabokov's Pnin who thought that, "once you learn the Cyrillic alphabet, you can read 'Anna Karamazov' in the original!")The vocabulary for the first lesson alone must number over 150 words.This approach makes for tough going at first.I can imagine many people give up half way through lesson one.I know I did.Then I spent a few months with a good Koine Greek program, one with better scaffolding for the beginner (William Mounce's,) before coming back to Reading Greek.

Bottom line: these books are well done, but dense and very demanding.If you're studying Greek on your own, you'll require either a lot of persistence--or assistance from other texts--to get you over the hump at the beginning of the course. ... Read more

Isbn: 0521219760
Sales Rank: 319836
Subjects:  1. Ancient Languages - Classical Greek    2. Foreign Language - Dictionaries / Phrase Books    3. Foreign Language Study    4. General    5. Grammar    6. Greek (Modern)    7. Greek language    8. Language    9. Readers    10. Language & Linguistics    11. Language Arts & Disciplines / General    12. Modern Greek   


$20.99

Speaking Greek Cassette (Reading Greek)
by Joint Association of Classical Teachers
Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
Audio Cassette (30 April, 1981)
list price: $26.00 -- our price: $26.00
(price subject to change: see help)
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Features

  • Unabridged
Reviews (4)

4-0 out of 5 stars A Decent Resource, But Not Great
Being a self-studier of Greek using the Reading Greek series from Cambridge Univ. Press, I heartily welcomed this tape which corresponds to the reader from the series with an excellent introduction to the individual sounds.

The only serious bone I had to pick with the tape is its brevity.The 65 minute duration of the tape went by all too quickly and I would have liked to have had perhaps a more in depth introduction (which is basically a vocalized version of the alphabet's explanation in Reading GreeK).Also, maybe an introduction of iambic meters would smooth the transition to the JACT's greek readers to be read after the completion of the course, I believe most of which include excerpts from the dramatists (who mainly use iambic meters).

Unlike the other reviewers, I didn't find the sound quality to be at all lacking.Even though the second section (featuring dramatized readings of a simplified text of Aristophanes' Clouds) does not sound quite as good as the introduction, I was able to hear every sound.

All in all, the tape could have been a bit longer for the price. But for self-study, I find the Reading Greek system to be nonpareil, mainly because it offers resources such as this one as well as introductions to history and texts in the original.

3-0 out of 5 stars like a play you could not hear
The actual reading is like listening to a shakespearean play given in a theater with a single microphone in the circle of speakers and each speaker being at least ten feet from the microphone. Terrible for learninganything.

3-0 out of 5 stars like a play you could not hear
The actual reading is like listening to a shakespearean play given in a theater with a single microphone in the circle of speakers and each speaker being at least ten feet from the microphone. Terrible for learninganything. ... Read more

Isbn: 0521239133
Sales Rank: 399423
Subjects:  1. Ancient Languages - Classical Greek    2. Audio - Language    3. General    4. Language    5. Language Arts & Disciplines    6. Ancient (Classical) Greek    7. Classical languages    8. For National Curriculum Key Stage 4 & GCSE    9. Language Arts & Disciplines / General    10. Linguistics   


$26.00

An Independent Study Guide to Reading Greek (Reading Greek)
by Joint Association of Classical Teachers
Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
Paperback (20 July, 1995)
list price: $26.99 -- our price: $26.99
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Reviews (2)

3-0 out of 5 stars The patch you need for "Reading Greek"
"Reading Greek" was first published in two volumes: the TEXT and the GRAMMAR, VOCABULARY AND EXERCISES."An Independent Study Guide to Reading Greek" was subsequently published to patch up the shortcomings of the original volumes (which could not be easily reprinted with corrections because they are so interrelated).The authors - a committee - admit that even teachers of Greek found the original volumes quite difficult to follow.The original explanations are too brief; reference material is scattered throughout the text; and the typography is poor (with some very small Greek fonts, and badly organized headings and subheadings).
If your school or university has prescribed "Reading Greek" - you wouldn't buy it otherwise - you are, unfortunately, part of a captive market and you really need to buy "An Independent Study Guide to Reading Greek" as well to make sense of the course.

4-0 out of 5 stars A self-study guide, designed to be used with the series.
Designed to be used in conjunction with the "Reading Greek" series.Gives answers to problems and translation notes. Excellent for self-study for someone who has had some training in a foreign language (esp. Latin), or has occasional access to a Greek teacher. ... Read more

Isbn: 0521478634
Sales Rank: 321776
Subjects:  1. Ancient Languages - Classical Greek    2. Anthropology - Cultural    3. Foreign Language - Dictionaries / Phrase Books    4. General    5. Greek language    6. Readers    7. Self-instruction    8. Social Science    9. Sociology    10. Ancient (Classical) Greek    11. Language & Linguistics    12. Language Arts & Disciplines / General    13. Language teaching & learning material & coursework    14. Linguistics   


$26.99

Reading Greek: Grammar, Vocabulary and Exercises (Reading Greek)
by Joint Association of Classical Teachers
Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
Paperback (02 November, 1978)
list price: $26.99 -- our price: $26.99
(price subject to change: see help)
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Reviews (14)

3-0 out of 5 stars Good reading selections, patchy grounding
As other reviewers have noted, the series is ungainly and one needs to have a minimum of three of the books (text, grammar and vocabulary, reader's guide)and possibly a fourth (vocabulary alone)before going on to the intermediate reading selections, of which there are now three.

But more importantly the evident strengths of the series are mixed with equally important weakness.It's indeed exciting to begin to read simplified Greek text from the first lesson, within a very few to be reading only slightly adapted extracts from the great authors, and to end with original passages from Demosthenes, Euripides, Herodotus, and Homer.All the selections (quite a few from Aristophanes and Plato)and settings (adapted from Thucydides for the time of the plague in Athens) are fascinating and authentic.

On the other hand, there are at least two problems apart from the awkwardness of using three or four books together.After the first seven or eight lessons, the level of difficulty gets exponential not so much in absorbing, but in retaining the grammatical complexity.The exercises are just too few to be really helpful in this regard.By the time the student finishes the basic text, the base is insufficient to go on reading other texts with facility.

A second problem is the diffuseness of the texts: a smattering of many different styles and types of ancient Greek does not really provide focus.As the language kept evolving, with the simplest being the koine, it's perhaps a mistake not to start with grounding first in this form.Alternatively, much more emphasis on Homer could equally help provide a base from which to expand.The most difficult authors in some ways are in the classical Attic (Demosthenes, Aristophanes, Plato).Again, it could have been a better strategy, even keeping the focus only on these, to concentrate on say, Plato.

To sum up, my suggestion would be to use this series with some caution: It's quite effective to acquire some of the basics, and reading all the text in the first volume is certainly a satisfying experience.But for a more thorough base in ancient Greek, it may be better to: (i) master the koine of the New Testament; (ii) focus on Homeric Greek with Pharr's text; (iii) and, acquire depth in the Attic dialect with either of different texts which rely on a single author (Hansen's course uses extracts from Plato; in the older tradition, Mather and Hewitt provide the whole of Xenophon's Anabasis in an excellent, annotated version).

3-0 out of 5 stars Good reading selections, patchy grounding
As other reviewers have noted, the series is ungainly and one needs to have a minimum of three of the books (text, grammar and vocabulary, reader's guide)and possibly a fourth (vocabulary alone)before going on to the intermediate reading selections, of which there are now three.

But more importantly the evident strengths of the series are mixed with equally important weakness.It's indeed exciting to begin to read simplified Greek text from the first lesson, within a very few to be reading only slightly adapted extracts from the great authors, and to end with original passages from Demosthenes, Euripides, Herodotus, and Homer.All the selections (quite a few from Aristophanes and Plato)and settings (adapted from Thucydides for the time of the plague in Athens) are fascinating and authentic.

On the other hand, there are at least two problems apart from the awkwardness of using three or four books together.After the first seven or eight lessons, the level of difficulty gets exponential not so much in absorbing, but in retaining the grammatical complexity.The exercises are just too few to be really helpful in this regard.By the time the student finishes the basic text, the base is insufficient to go on reading other texts with facility.

A second problem is the diffuseness of the texts: a smattering of many different styles and types of ancient Greek does not really provide focus.As the language kept evolving, with the simplest being the koine, it's perhaps a mistake not to start with grounding first in this form.Alternatively, much more emphasis on Homer could equally help provide a base from which to expand.The most difficult authors in some ways are in the classical Attic (Demosthenes, Aristophanes, Plato).Again, it could have been a better strategy, even keeping the focus only on these, to concentrate on say, Plato.

To sum up, my suggestion would be to use this series with some caution: It's quite effective to acquire some of the basics, and reading all the text in the first volume is certainly a satisfying experience.But for a more thorough base in ancient Greek, it may be better to: (i) master the koine of the New Testament; (ii) focus on Homeric Greek with Pharr's text; (iii) and, acquire depth in the Attic dialect with either of different texts which rely on a single author (Hansen's course uses extracts from Plato; in the older tradition, Mather and Hewitt provide the whole of Xenophon's Anabasis in an excellent, annotated version).

4-0 out of 5 stars Tough going, but valuable
Before you buy into this book series, go clear off your desk.You're going to need a lot of space to spread out your Reading Greek library.

At a minimum, you will need two books: the "Text," which includes Greek readings with brief English introductions, and "Grammar, Vocabulary and Exercises," (GVE) which includes the actual pedagogical materials to guide you through the Text's readings.You'll need both books open at the same time to do your work.

Two books might not be enough if you're studying on your own.You will also want to pick up "An independent study guide to Reading Greek."This book gives slightly more in-depth discussion of the vocabulary and grammatical points covered in GVE, translations of the Text, and answers to the GVE exercises.And if you're teaching yourself, you can pick up "The teachers' notes to Reading Greek."This book gives tips on how to manage the materials in the two basic books.If you know a little Greek before you start, this book helps you figure out what strategy the authors are pursuing.

But you're not done.There's a thin "Greek vocabulary" that goes with the series.It provides all the vocabulary for the Text in one place.And there is a nice history of ancient Greece that complements the text, "The world of Athens."This book provides background on Greek culture, politics, and arts.The independent study guide cross-references sections in "The world" to chapters in the "Reading Greek" books.Very helpful when you come across a cultural reference and wonder what it means.

But wait--that's not all.If you can make it through all these books, there are two readers to continue your studies.One is an anthology of classic Greek texts, the other an introduction to the later, New Testament Greek.I hope someday to be in a position to make use of them.

One last thing.If you're like me and need to hear a language to learn it, you should listen to the audio tape that accompanies the series.Be warned that the audio quality is not so good.The recordings are rather noisy, making it hard to hear exactly how the speakers are pronouncing things.But since no one really knows how Attic Greek sounded, maybe you don't need to listen that closely.

Finally, concerning the value of the texts themselves: I find this series difficult to use, but worthwhile.In lesson one, the authors teach you the Greek alphabet and then drop you right into a seven page Greek story.(Perhaps the authors were inspired by that girl in Nabokov's Pnin who thought that, "once you learn the Cyrillic alphabet, you can read 'Anna Karamazov' in the original!")The vocabulary for the first lesson alone must number over 150 words.This approach makes for tough going at first.I can imagine many people give up half way through lesson one.I know I did.Then I spent a few months with a good Koine Greek program, one with better scaffolding for the beginner (William Mounce's,) before coming back to Reading Greek.

Bottom line: these books are well done, but dense and very demanding.If you're studying Greek on your own, you'll require either a lot of persistence--or assistance from other texts--to get you over the hump at the beginning of the course. ... Read more

Isbn: 0521219779
Sales Rank: 323666
Subjects:  1. Ancient Languages - Classical Greek    2. Foreign Language - Dictionaries / Phrase Books    3. Foreign Language Study    4. General    5. Grammar    6. Greek (Modern)    7. Greek language    8. Language    9. Readers    10. Language & Linguistics    11. Language Arts & Disciplines / General    12. Modern Greek   


$26.99

Reading Greek: Greek Vocabulary (Reading Greek)
by Joint Association of Classical Teachers
Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars
Paperback (09 October, 1980)
list price: $14.99 -- our price: $14.99
(price subject to change: see help)
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Reviews (1)

3-0 out of 5 stars Just for JACT
This book, while a handy and concise book, is by no means to be used as a source for anything other than JACT's publications, most notably "Reading Greek: Text" and "World of Heroes," featuring the "Vocabulary to be Learnt" from each. ... Read more

Isbn: 0521232775
Sales Rank: 475431
Subjects:  1. Ancient Languages - Classical Greek    2. Foreign Language - Dictionaries / Phrase Books    3. General    4. Greek Language    5. Language    6. Language Arts & Disciplines    7. Vocabulary    8. Hellenic languages    9. Language & Linguistics    10. Language Arts & Disciplines / General   


$14.99

The World of Athens (Reading Greek)
by Joint Association of Classical Teachers
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
Paperback (30 January, 1984)
list price: $30.99 -- our price: $30.99
(price subject to change: see help)
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Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars Should be the example for other history books
That is the best written history book I've read. The book really kept me concentrated on it for a long time with it's lively and information-rich structure. Book deals with nearly all aspects of life in Athens: political, economical, art, religious, classes, slaves, important people at the time. I would recommend to anyone who likes history generally or anybody who wants a good intro to ancient greeks especially Athens.

5-0 out of 5 stars One of the best referencebooks I own
"The World of Athens" presents a history of Athens in a well organized format.Covers all aspects of Athenian history from geography to wars to politics.It is one of my most valued reference books.

4-0 out of 5 stars Good resource for Athenian society
While this book covers the usual subjects like geography, religion, social apects, the wars etc., it gives enough information on everything to be the one book on classical Athens that you should have as a reference guide tofurther study. I used this booking when studying 5th century Athens andfound that other books added to the information I got from it, but did notequal or replace its content. ... Read more

Isbn: 0521273897
Sales Rank: 354276
Subjects:  1. Ancient - Greece    2. Ancient Greece - History    3. Anthropology - Cultural    4. Athens (Greece)    5. Civilization    6. Greece    7. History - General History    8. Social Science    9. Sociology    10. To 146 B.C    11. Ancient Greece    12. History / General    13. Language & Linguistics   


$30.99

Reading Greek: A World of Heroes : Selections from Homer, Herodotus and Sophocles (Reading Greek)
by Joint Association of Classical Teachers
Average Customer Review: 2.0 out of 5 stars
Paperback (04 October, 1979)
list price: $23.99 -- our price: $23.99
(price subject to change: see help)
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Reviews (2)

2-0 out of 5 stars Not the Best Reader for Intermediate Greek Students
A World of Heroes is one of a number of readers published by the Joint Association of Classical Teachers for students who have finished learning the basics of the language. This volume contains selections from Homer (a book and a half of the Iliad, with the twenty-second book -the slaying of Hector- in its entirety), Herodotus (focusing mainly on Xerxes' invasion of Greece, particularly the battle of Thermopylai), as well as about 650 lines of Sophocles' Oidipous Tyrannos.

Unfortunately, for a number of reasons, I cannot recommend the reader to intermediate students, particularly to those learning the language on their own.

The first reason is that, although Homer, Herodotus, and Sophocles wrote in different dialects, no material is presented that would familiarize the reader with the salient features of each dialect. Although the reader who has worked through the Reading Greek course published by the Joint Association of Classical Teachers will have been introduced to the basic features of the dialects, other students who come to the text having learnt only Attic Greek via the standard texts or Homeric Greek via Pharr's course will need a few pages explicating the basic peculiarities of the dialects.

The second reason is that the help offered with the texts is meagre at best. All that is given is a running vocabulary with only the most occasional explanation of difficult phrases. Even with Homer and Herodotus, who are easy authors, a running vocabulary barely suffices. However, with Sophocles, who is most definitely not an easy author, a running vocabulary without extensive explanatory notes is simply cruel.

In order to make reading Sophocles an even more nightmarish experience for the reader, the editors have made errors in printing the text. For example, although lines 435, 436, and lines 447-462 are spoken by Tereisias in every other edition of Oidipous Tyrannos, they are attributed to Oedipus in A World of Heroes. Having to check a translation or other edition of the play in the original to figure out who's really saying which lines only adds to the frustration.

If you have some prior experience in reading Homer and would like to read Book 22 of the Iliad quickly, then you might find A World of Heroes useful. Otherwise, it is not worth the purchase.
A bit of browsing around Amazon.com will lead to much better books for the intermediate student of Ancient Greek.

2-0 out of 5 stars An Alternative Idea
I used the JACT Reading Greek course as a Freshman and have recommended it to many people wanting to learn Greek on their own. It focuses more on reading fluency than on syntax-worship (boring Smyth stuff like "dative of throwing by means of rocks") but doesn't neglect formal grammar, has a nice teach-yourself book to accompany it, and has lots of fun readings from Aristophanes.

In other words, unlike most teachers, I *liked* the Reading Greek course a lot.But the point of the course is to introduce you to basic vocabulary and especially the grammatical structure of the language and its peculiarities.Once you've done that by going through the first-year course, what you need is lots of practice with actual texts.That's what the JACT follow-up books like this offer, with "highlights" of different authors and running vocabulary, and if you find that the most helpful, more power too you.

Me personally though, I recommend using the Loeb parallel-text editions, whose texts are good and whose translations have tended over the last many years towards fairly strict literalness.The advantage there is that, even though you'll still want to look many of the words up to see what their central or most basic meaning is (independent of present context), you have a translation there specially designed to guide the language-learner.You won't sit there thinking, "did that say what I think it said?", or start joking with or pontificating to your fellows based on a wrong reading.

The classic second-year text for Greek is Xenophon's Anabasis, which is very repetitious but in a good way.Less conventional but just as appealing are the mythographer Apollodorus, the historian Diodorus Siculus (book 17 is on Alexander the Great), and of course Plato.The first book of Herodotus too, though not Attic, would be an excellent second-year text.

And if you're particularly eager to get into Homer (the best of all) and then the tragedians, I recommend Pharr's excellent Homeric Greek, which is meant as a first-year book but better for a second- or third-year one. He takes the whole first book of the Iliad, a paragraph or so at a time, with notes and full vocabulary.(You might even use it with the very literal Loeb translation by A. T. Murray.) Good luck! ... Read more

Isbn: 0521224624
Sales Rank: 545027
Subjects:  1. Ancient Languages - Classical Greek    2. Ancient and Classical    3. General    4. Greek language    5. Language    6. Language Arts & Disciplines    7. Literature - Classics / Criticism    8. Readers    9. Language & Linguistics    10. Language Arts & Disciplines / General   


$23.99

Reading Greek Tragedy
by Simon Goldhill
Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars
Paperback (08 May, 1986)
list price: $27.99 -- our price: $27.99
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Reviews (3)

4-0 out of 5 stars An introduction for anyone serious about understanding...
The two reviews here are silly and do not address the book directly. Goldhill is ambitious. He is trying to explain the nature of Greek tragedy and the circumstances of its development. He does this by discussing, in turn, particular works and particular themes. For instance, he discusses works that can only be understood in terms of the interworkings of the Greek polis and then describes the nature of the polis and its imhabitants. It is an impressive and illuminating product; those who are serious about understanding Greek tragedy should take the time to work though it.

4-0 out of 5 stars Tempering the One Critique on this Page
Admittedly, I have not read this book, but I have read a number of Goldhill's essays on Greek tragedy, published in a variety of journals and collections. Goldhill is a fine scholar. He is certainly not the most readable, but few classicists are. While I cannot guarantee that this book is excellent or easy, I find it improbable (in the extreme) that it is wholly poor, certainly not to the extent that the reviewer above implies.

1-0 out of 5 stars The only Greek tragedy is Goldhill's lack of talent.
An abomination - that is, literally, an offence against God. And I am an atheist. So awful that one must create a deity in order to match its evil.

Never, ever buy this book - you will be supporting a despicable, talentless and depraved individual in his sordid and contemptible quests. ... Read more

Isbn: 0521315794
Sales Rank: 193013
Subjects:  1. Ancient, Classical & Medieval    2. General    3. Greek drama (Tragedy)    4. History and criticism    5. Language    6. Language Arts & Disciplines    7. Literature - Classics / Criticism    8. Language Arts & Disciplines / General    9. Literary studies: classical, early & medieval   


$27.99

A Greek-English Lexicon
by Henry George Liddell, Robert Scott, Henry Stuart Jones, Roderick McKenzie
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
Hardcover (01 July, 1996)
list price: $150.00 -- our price: $150.00
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Reviews (15)

4-0 out of 5 stars The Big One
As an ageing student of Greek, an aged pensioner only half way through the second year of a university course in the subject,I decided to ask my wife to give me the big lexicon for Christmas. Some say it is best to wait until more advanced study is required, but waiting several years at my age is perhaps overly optimistic.Generally I find the Intermediate version very useful, and I have it sitting on top of the Big One. I am sure the large version will be of considerable use, but it won't be travelling with me. I also have the small version which fits well into my luggage.

The use of Victorian English does not worry me (we can all change "hither" and "thither" into more likely expressions), but the smallness of the print and its lack of clarity is a bit of a problem. I have decided that when I use the unabridged edition it will be in the daytime, and on sunny days at that! I am very thankful for a little magnifying set-up that I made when using Reading Greek as a textbook- very clear but very small print. My spectacles help too of course!

A CD-ROM version may be useful to some people, but I much prefer books for frequent use. The computer is in a different room from where I do my real work. I couldn't stand having one of these monstrosities looking at me as I study Greek.

So far I am very positive about the large version of the lexicon. It can hardly have five stars because it has some inadequacies, but it is better to have it than not.I might write another review in a year's time and give a revised view.


5-0 out of 5 stars This is really about a CD-Rom Version
Logos Research software has now made this edition in electronic form, all the supplements are integrated in the main text.Each time there is an abbreviation you just hover the mouse over it and the full title is put up, no more having to look in the abbriviation lists, it makes it a lot easier.This also solves the problem of small typeface, you can really see everything clearly.They have also done an electronic form of the BDAG lexicon and HALOT for the OT.So if you want to get this lexicon but the small typeface is a problem check out the electronic versions.Logos has a lot of other stuff related to Greek, Hebrew, Aramaic, and Syriac also, and the Dead Sea Scrolls.So check it out.

5-0 out of 5 stars Older Eighth Edition from the American Book Company
Just to add comment on all the discussion concerning printing.After reading the above comments, I decided to purchase an earlier edition of the Liddell & Scott via eBay.I took a risk but found that the "big" Liddell, 8th ed., published American Book Company (New York: Cincinnati: Chicago) was typeset and not the undesirable offset.At a savings of about $100, I got the best version (the big Liddell) of the best lexicon (Liddell & Scott) with the clearest printing (typeset).There is no better lexicon for pagan or sacred writings in the classical or koine Greek. ... Read more

Isbn: 0198642261
Sales Rank: 62075
Subjects:  1. Ancient Greek    2. Ancient Languages - Classical Greek    3. Dictionaries    4. English    5. Foreign Language - Dictionaries / Phrase Books    6. Greek language    7. Language    8. Ancient (Classical) Greek    9. Bilingual dictionaries    10. Language & Linguistics   


$150.00

Greek Grammar
by Herbert W. Smyth
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
Hardcover (01 June, 1983)
list price: $43.95 -- our price: $37.98
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Reviews (5)

5-0 out of 5 stars Still the best Greek grammar
I am sad to say that I never bought this Grammar during my four years of studying Classics while in college.If I had been smart and actually bought this when I started I could have saved myself a lot of time and prevented a lot of headaches.Now I know that Smythe is old, and some of his approaches are outdated, but that does not mean his grammar book is still effective.His work on both prepositions and moods of verbs are the best I have found and have helped me tremendously.There are some scholars who have surpassed Smythe's work in other areas of Greek grammar and syntax, but as far as a basic and comprehensive grammar goes, Smythe is still the best for your both your wallet and your studies.

5-0 out of 5 stars The best for all pre-modern Greek except Hellenistic.
This is an excellent reference book! It has passed the test of heavy usage, and it has outlasted many academic fads.

Smyth does a thorough yet concise job on the known varieties of written Greek usage from the Homeric epics up to the beginning of the Hellenistic period .

Smyth does not cover Hellenistic (Koiné) Greek as much, especially not for texts that have Semitic or Egyptian "flavors:" the Septuagint, New Testament and Egyptian Greek papyri. For real grammars on those, look up these authors: Wallace, Dana, Mantey, Robertson, Blass, Debrunner, Funk, Conybeare, Stock and Zerwick.

Some writers in the centuries between the reigns of Augustus and Constantine, and the Byzantines afterward, tried to "return" to Classical Attic usage in writing, with mixed results. When reading them, use both Smyth and a Hellenistic/Koiné grammar together, carefully.

5-0 out of 5 stars You will thank yourself.
This specific edition of the book is a joy.The brilliant oxblood leather cover, the cream-colored pages, intoxicating in their aroma.You think I'm a fool, but this book is a dream.And as a grammar, it's indispensable. Read what the other reviewers have said, then read what I have and decide:is $30 too much to spend for such a valuable reference, and so beautiful abook besides?I think not. ... Read more

Isbn: 0674362500
Sales Rank: 9365
Subjects:  1. 1870-    2. Ancient Languages - Classical Greek    3. Foreign Language - Dictionaries / Phrase Books    4. Grammar    5. Greek (Modern)    6. Greek language    7. Language   


$37.98

Diodorus Siculus (Loeb Classical Library, No 390)
by Diodorus Siculus
Hardcover (01 June, 1939)
list price: $21.50 -- our price: $21.50
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Isbn: 0674994299
Sales Rank: 843900
Subjects:  1. Ancient - Greece    2. History - General History    3. History: World   


$21.50

The Campaigns of Alexander (Penguin Classics)
by Arrian, Flavius Arrianus
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
Paperback (01 October, 1976)
list price: $15.00 -- our price: $10.20
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Reviews (9)

5-0 out of 5 stars Cavemen?
The wierdest part of this history was the account in Indika of the island of cavemen that Nearchos ran into, and battled with his fleet...

"There was a lagoon at the mouths of the river, and the depressions near the bank were inhabited by natives in stifling cabins. These seeing the convoy sailing up were astounded, and lining along the shore stood ready to repel any who should attempt a landing. They carried thick spears, about six cubits long; these had no iron tip, but the same result was obtained by hardening the point with fire. They were in number about six hundred. Nearchus observed these evidently standing firm and drawn up in order, and ordered the ships to hold back within range, so that their missiles might reach the shore; for the natives' spears, which looked stalwart, were good for close fighting, but had no terrors against a volley. Then Nearchus took the lightest and lightest-armed troops, such as were also the best swimmers, and bade them swim off as soon as the word was given. Their orders were that, as soon as any swimmer found bottom, he should await his mate, and not attack the natives till they had their formation three deep; but then they were to raise their battle cry and charge at the double. On the word, those detailed for this service dived from the ships into the sea, and swam smartly, and took up their formation in orderly manner, and having made a phalanx, charged, raising, for their part, their battle cry to the God of War, and those on shipboard raised the cry along with them; and arrows and missiles from the engines were hurled against the natives. They, astounded at the flash of the armour, and the swiftness of the charge, and attacked by showers of arrows and missiles, half naked as they were, never stopped to resist but gave way. Some were killed in flight; others were captured; but some escaped into the hills. Those captured were hairy, not only their heads but the rest of their bodies; their nails were rather like beasts' claws; they used their nails (according to report) as if they were iron tools; with these they tore asunder their fishes, and even the less solid kinds of wood; everything else they cleft with sharp stones; for iron they did not possess. For clothing they wore skins of animals, some even the thick skins of the larger fishes."

Cavemen who dont at all use metal, but only stones and fingernails...they wear animal skins...but most importantly, bodies COVERED in hair? What?! I want to go search for this island.

I want to go look for this island, i know how wierd it is, but THIS paragraph caught my eye more than any other in this work.

PS:
Arrian's account of Alexander is the best ancient source, though he is a bit of an apologist for the actions of Alexander, so dont believe ALL that Arrian says. The guy though was an actual general, and he had fought and conquered, he was someone who had been through many of the same situations as Alexander as a governor and general, so he DOES know what he is talking about.
Great work...

5-0 out of 5 stars Of Myth and Men
The most amazing thing that about this book is that Arrian somehow managed to rescue the man from the legend, the god from the myth and the story from the soothsayers.He intended to write a factual history of the great leader but by necessity was forced to rely on word of mouth, old stories, past recollections and hardly any authoritative manuscripts.

Considering what he had to work with, the outcome is simply amazing.Like Thucydides, Herodotus and Livy, his goal was to write a factual work that was to have been definitive...and it was.The campaigns are given much attention as well as the character of Alexander.For a more scholarly and literary work I recommend Robin Lane Fox and his biography of Alexander - just stupendous.

5-0 out of 5 stars Amazing Book!
This book is a PRIMARY SOURCE that is great for any student. An ancient work that has great deatails. It is actually interesting to read, even if you just use it for school. If you want more information on this book, feel free to e-mail me at Silvermouse51@aol.com. I will try to respond to your e-mail as soon as possible. Again, buy this book if you're doing a project on Alexander the Great! It's the absolute best you can ever buy! ... Read more

Isbn: 0140442537
Sales Rank: 121668
Subjects:  1. 356-323 B.C    2. 356-323 B.C.    3. Alexander the Great    4. Alexander,    5. Ancient - Greece    6. Early works to 1800    7. History    8. History - General History    9. History: World    10. Iran    11. the Great,    12. Alexander    13. Ancient Greece    14. Campaigns    15. European history: BCE to c 500 CE   


$10.20

History of Alexander, The (Penguin Classics)
by Quintus Curtius Rufus, WaldemarHeckel, JohnYardley
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
Paperback (06 November, 1984)
list price: $13.00 -- our price: $10.40
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Reviews (4)

5-0 out of 5 stars Five stars academically, two stars as 'popular' history
Not an easy book to review.This is a 'scholarly' account-Curtius' "History of Alexander" is one of the sources for the great general's life, written some time after his death, written by a Roman, and written for a Roman market which venerated the military genius of Alexander and appreciated his skills in prefiguring the Roman methods of diplomacy ... i.e., proffering the hand of friendship, but carrying a very sharp sword.

Anyone with an academic interest in the era will be aware of the strengths and weaknesses of this work and will hardly require a populist review.However, anyone looking for an accessible, readable account and analysis of Alexander's career and impact on Europe and Asia will not find it here.So, while the work merits five stars for its scholarship, as a piece of accessible, popular history, two stars is not an uncharitable assessment.

Curtius' "History" is preserved in fragmentary form only.The first two 'books' are missing and can only be offered in summary form.Written at least three hundred years after Alexander's death, Curtius' work is based on primary Greek sources which are no longer to be found.In his introduction Heckel argues that the author, Curtius, was alive in the time of Claudius and wrote this work around 40-50 AD.Others, however, have suggested that the writer lived later, and wrote around 200 AD.

This may appear a spurious debate for those interested solely in Alexander himself, but Heckel demonstrates that the content of the work does make allusions to contemporary Roman life and politics, and that it's historical accuracy is distorted to provide commentary on Roman life, thus diverging from a true description of Alexander's world.

Heckel's introduction is informative, well argued, and provides a sound basis for appreciating the value of the text. John Yardley's translation is fine.It is scholarly and, from what I can gather, an accurate translation.This does not, however, make it a 'good read' in 21st century terms.The Roman style of historical writing is a trifle staccato for modern tastes, tends to follow a process of making statements or offering allusions.Its narrative dynamic and analytical style are slow, terse, and somewhat disjointed.Given that fragments of the 'books' are missing, the sense of continuity is further fractured.

The content of Curtius' "History" is fascinating.For anyone with a scholarly interest in the era (and that can include amateur historians or even wargamers), there is plenty of detail and plenty of flavour of the Greek world to have you poring over this for years.This is a book to dissect, to search for evidence rather than to read.It is a book which poses questions rather than provides answers.

An essential source, a fine translation backed by a sound introduction, this is not a book for light reading, but it is a 'must' for the shelves of the enthusiast, and it is a book which will be referred to again and again by anyone with more than a passing interest in the world of Alexander.

3-0 out of 5 stars Alexander the Great's Art of Strategy is much better
I recently read a slew of books about Alexander the Great in anticipation of the movie. I have to admit that hile this academic text might be required reading of many college and high school history classes, I found Alexander the Great's Art of Strategy much more engaging, insightful, and fun to read. The battle descriptions in the this book are phenomenal. One feels like one is right in the middle of a battle. Rufus doesn't do such a great job.

5-0 out of 5 stars Brilliant Source
Though not the definitive work on Alexander, Curtius provides detail not included by other sources. Sometimes hypocritical and biased, Curtius details the campaigns of Alexander with heavy focus on Alexander the person. To read this book is a must for anyone interested in Alexander. It is one of the primary sources and the fact that he is not as nice about Alexander (such as Plutarch or Arrian) may indeed do justice to the reader. This book can best be understood with the addition of Fuller's "The Generalship of Alexander The Great". ... Read more

Isbn: 0140444122
Sales Rank: 76876
Subjects:  1. 356-323 B.C    2. 356-323 B.C.    3. Alexander,    4. Biography    5. Biography/Autobiography    6. Early works to 1800    7. General    8. Generals    9. Greece    10. History    11. History - General History    12. Macedonian Expansion, 359-323 B.C    13. the Great,    14. Alexander    15. Ancient Greece    16. Biography: historical    17. European history: BCE to c 500 CE    18. History / General   


$10.40

Plutarch's Lives: Demosthenes and Cicero, Alexander and Caesar (Lcl, No. 99)
by Plutarch
Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
Hardcover (01 July, 1985)
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Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars Intriguing Lives, Great Biographies
Plutarch (or Ploutarchos in Greek), shows in this book that he is one of the best biographers of all time.

He uses written and oral sources to construct the life stories of four important historical figures, Demosthenes, Cicero, Alexander, and Caesar. These are all great personalities, with virtues and vices, wtih strengths and weaknesses, and Plutarch shows both the negative and the postive sides of their character and actions.

Plutarch is both a historian and a storyteller. In this sense he is no different than the popular biographers and historians of today. In addition, he does not detach himself form the events and people he writes about; he frequently makes moral judgements. He praises them when they do something praiseworthy, and he criticizes them when they do something deplorable. That is also not different from the way the current popular historians and biographers approach their topics. Don't Stephen Ambrose or David McCullough also make moral judgements about the people they write about? Don't they also emotionally attach themselves to the people and events they examine? Isn't that what makes their books such a pleasure to read?

Plutarch's books are a pleasure to read, too. That's why they have been popular for more than eighteen hundred years.

A parallel recounting of the stories of persons whose lives had some striking similarities (thus leading to comparison and contrast) is a clever method, and it is difficult to understand why it is hardly ever used today.

The Greek used by Plutarch is relatively easy to understand; the translation is good and, albeit more than eighty years' old, is appealing to today's reader.

So, if you want to improve, or work on, your Ancient Greek, this book is for you.

If you are interested in the history of 4th-Century B.C. Ancient Greece, and the conflicts, intrigues, interpersonal clashes, political systems, and cultural values of that period, this book is for you.

And, finally, if you enjoy reading intriguing life stories, well told, this book is definitely for you.

4-0 out of 5 stars Action and Words
Is the sword mightier than the pen? It certainly is in the short term going by the lives featured here. Alexander and Caesar were the greatestconquerors of the ancient world while Cicero and Demosthenes are consideredto have been its greatest wordsmiths.

This collection of four lives isfurther connected by the fact that the two orators opposed the twoconquerors, raising important moral questions about freedom and democracy.Demosthenes, a great speaker who was cowardly by nature, saw Alexander andhis father Philip as no better than barborous tyrants, while Cicero, whoalso lacked the military virtues, fought a verbal war to preserve the RomanRepublic. Although being spared by their opponents, both Demosthenes andCicero were finally hunted and killed by their successors.

By today'sstandards we would condemn Alexander and Caesar as ruthless, bloodthirstytyrants, however, judging these two great men outside their historicalcontext is grossly unfair. Without Alexander, the Greeks would havecontinued to fight their petty wars and Hellenic culture would haveremained confined to a small corner of the Mediterranean. As for Caesar'susurpation of power, it was vital for Rome's survival to separategovernment from politics as the constant electioneering, bribery, partisanstrife, riots, plots, and military coups were causing anarchy at the heartof the Republic.

Writing at a time when a strong Imperial system wassafeguarding Hellenic culture and prosperity throughout the Mediterranean,it is not surprising that Plutarch saw Alexander and Caesar in such apositive light.

Whatever message he may wish to convey, Plutarch'swriting is full of delights, focusing on character traits, interestingquotes, great events, and always going off on those wonderful tangentsabout natural history, superstitions, or the customs of far awaycountries.

These are four interesting biographies. But why buy 4 whenthere are volumes with 8 or 9, or even ALL the 'Lives' of Plutarch?

2-0 out of 5 stars Plutarch:The historian that changes history
You have ancient historians like Polybius, Thucydides, and Seutonius who tell the facts and do not change them.But with Plutarch, it's a different ballgame.Plutarch wants to make the good people look bad and the badpeople look good. Try to avoid any book written by Plutarch for all thelives he has written about are sketchy.I was kind enough to give the booktwo stars so if you actually are resding this, here's my advise:if youhave money to blow, get it and try and read it, but don't go out of yourway. ... Read more

Isbn: 0674991109
Sales Rank: 152348
Subjects:  1. Literature - Classics / Criticism    2. Reference   


$21.50

Justin: Epitome of the Philippic History of Pompeius Trogus : Books 11-12 : Alexander the Great (Clarendon Ancient History Series)
by Marcus Junianus Justinus, John Yardley, Waldemar Heckel
Paperback (01 October, 1996)
list price: $65.00 -- our price: $65.00
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Isbn: 0198149085
Sales Rank: 1143552
Subjects:  1. 356-323 B.C    2. 356-323 B.C.    3. Alexander,    4. Ancient - Rome    5. Ancient and Classical    6. Biography    7. Early works to 1800    8. Generals    9. Greece    10. History    11. History - General History    12. History: World    13. Macedonian Expansion, 359-323 B.C    14. the Great,    15. Ancient Greece    16. Ancient Rome    17. European history: BCE to c 500 CE   


$65.00

Women and Monarchy in Macedonia (Oklahoma Series in Classical Culture)
by Elizabeth Donnelly Carney
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
Hardcover (01 June, 2000)
list price: $45.00 -- our price: $45.00
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Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars same quality as Heckel's Marshals
If you liked Heckel's book "Marshals of Alexander", you will like this one too. Beth Carney writes good, short biographies of the important women that were around in Alexander's time. I might disagree on deatils with her view e.g. on Roxane, but this is a thorough, serious and especially very readable scholarly study. I have waited two years since its publication before I bought it. I wished I had not. ... Read more

Isbn: 0806132124
Sales Rank: 710052
Subjects:  1. Ancient - General    2. Ancient - Greece    3. Ancient World History    4. Biography    5. History    6. History - General History    7. History: World    8. Macedonia    9. Queens    10. Women    11. Women - Ancient History    12. Women in public life    13. Women's Studies - General    14. Women's Studies - History   


$45.00

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