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Books - History - Historical Study - Medieval History and Monarchy

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    The Middle Ages (A Royal History of England)
    by John Gillingham, Peter Earle, Antonia Fraser
    Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (06 November, 2000)
    list price: $13.95 -- our price: $13.95
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    Reviews (1)

    3-0 out of 5 stars Basic and easy reading
    It's not great history but it's short and readable and has nice pictures. I read a lot of history but I've always had trouble sorting out all those Henries and Edwards in between William the Conqueror and Henry VIII and this was a great help. It goes from William the Conqueror up to 1400, which is when Henry IV bumped off Richard II. It's only 117 pages, some of which are illustrations so you just get the basic stories of the kings and queens. There's a little about Wales and Scotland but, even allowing for its brevity, Ireland is short-changed. It reminded me at times of Sellar and Yates's "1066 and All That" which parodies potted histories and snap judgments and I don't know what professional historians think of its accuracy, but it does the job it sets out to do. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0520227999
    Sales Rank: 141831
    Subjects:  1. Biography    2. Europe - General    3. Europe - Great Britain - General    4. Great Britain    5. History    6. History - General History    7. History: World    8. Kings and rulers    9. Medieval    10. Medieval period, 1066-1485    11. Queens   


    $13.95

    The Oxford Illustrated History of Medieval Europe (Oxford Illustrated Histories)
    by George Holmes
    Paperback (01 March, 2001)
    list price: $24.95 -- our price: $16.47
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    Isbn: 0192854356
    Sales Rank: 111845
    Subjects:  1. 476-1492    2. Europe    3. Europe - General    4. History    5. History - General History    6. History: World    7. Medieval    8. Medieval World History (Circa 450 - Circa 1450)    9. European history: c 500 to c 1500   


    $16.47

    Atlas of Medieval History, The New Penguin : Revised Edition (Hist Atlas)
    by ColinMcEvedy, DavidWoodroffe
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (03 November, 1992)
    list price: $13.95 -- our price: $10.46
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    Reviews (8)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Nice for students of Medieval Europe
    Good book with simple maps, black, white and green and not poor texts. Detailed. But unfortunately, mostly focuses on European history. I' d call it Atlas of Medieval Europe.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Poor map quality and duller history!
    This book uses ONE single map on every page to document the movement of various people over time.However, it does notdesignate major landmarks.It tells of tribes crossing the Danube and the Volga but these rivers are never labeled.It refers to the Tigris and Euphrates but you need another map to tell you where they are.When major landmarks are not identified it is hard to understand how this can be called an Atlas.The history is disjointed and poorly written.The only reason to buy this book is that you don't have a match with which to burn your money.

    4-0 out of 5 stars What about Africa and Asia?
    This is a great work and describes the barbarian migrations across Europe very well.The big flaw though lies in the, "History dosen't take place outside of Europe" mindset.India, China, Japan, South-East Asia, and Africa all should have been included in this work and than this book would have been vital to any student of history.Instead Penguin makes you have to buy three other books to get the complete history. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0140512497
    Sales Rank: 39017
    Subjects:  1. 476-1492    2. Europe    3. Europe - General    4. Geography, Medieval    5. Historical Atlases    6. Historical geography    7. History    8. History - General History    9. History: World    10. Maps    11. Medieval    12. History / General    13. Reference works    14. World history: c 500 to C 1500   


    $10.46

    Ecclesiastical History of the English People (Penguin Classics)
    by Bede, D. H. Farmer, Ronald E. Latham, LeoSherley-Price
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 May, 1991)
    list price: $12.95 -- our price: $10.36
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    Reviews (8)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Historians Legacy
    A few years ago, I had the chance to go to Durham Cathedral.As an American medievalist with a love of the Anglo-Saxon era I jumped at the chance.I had a chance there to see not only the resting place of Saint Cuthbert, but also The Vernerable Bede.

    The Venerable Bede -- this is not a name, only an office.What his actual name was we will probably never know, but that is less important than the historical narrative he has left us.Having in mind to write a history of the English peoples, he goes on to write a work filled with wonders, colourful characters, foul villains, and ever and ever again, miracles.

    The Bede was an ecclesiast and saw all of history filtered through the glass of the Church.Yet somehow he does not come off as "preachy" as many other historians of the time.Maybe it is because of his deft characterizations, maybe his succinct view of the seemingly necessary course of history, but in any case I find myself caught up in a well-told tale, with morals attached.

    By modern terms the Bede's work is one-sided and biased, and yet if you wish a true window into a world, it is best to have a guide.The Bede gives us such a window, however imperfect, yet carefully and thoughtfully written.To understand the northern English kingdoms of the early Middle Ages, one must consult the Bede; luckily, he is also a sympathetic fellow and draws us in, gently and knowingly, and offers us historical truths (especially close to his own time) as well as small sermons.

    4-0 out of 5 stars A great overview of early English History
    I found this book wonderful as a broad overview of early England.The reader must keep in mind the social and religous beliefs of the author and of the times.I liked the broad brush the author uses to describe the people and climate of the time. A very enjoyable read....

    5-0 out of 5 stars Treasure of the English People
    There is a definite thrill to reading the actual words set down by the infamously unassuming monk himself.This is why there are so many fields where "Bede" is mandatory foundational literature, but if you are a student of English history, literature, theology, philosophy, or sociology you already know that.One of the most lasting of the many images the book creates is the biography of Bede himself; surviving a plague that left only the abbot and the young boy Bede to sing the Divine Offices, then settling in at Jarrow where he was sheltered with the precious books for the remainder of his life.

    Dated as 731, Bede's history was written in his old age (when he was 60 or so) and his gentle manner of reflection on the relationship of kings, gentry, the Church, it's priests and leaders, and common folk with one another informs one quite clearly of the many years spent teaching other monks, repeatedly re-reading texts, and living the religious life that bestowed the title "Venerable Bede" upon him.A professional academic in every modern sense of the word, knowledgeable, inquiring, conscious of his place in history, inventor of the chronological annotation (A.D.), meticulous researcher of events, places, and times; from any perspective you choose, this book demands to be part of your life experience.

    This edition (which is probably the best-known - it's Sherley-Price's 1955 translation)includes both Bede's Letter to Egbert and the great eyewitness account of Bede's death by Cuthbert, upon which a significant part of Bede's reputation rests.There is no way to read Cuthbert's letter without understanding the ideal of humility for a medieval monk.....the image of him giving away his earthly treasures of pepper, handkerchiefs and incense in the hours before he dies....it's an image that stays with you forever.

    All in all, the work is one of the treasures of our species.... ... Read more

    Isbn: 014044565X
    Sales Rank: 127097
    Subjects:  1. Christianity - History - General    2. Early Church (To 476)    3. Europe - Great Britain - General    4. History - General History    5. History: World    6. Early Church    7. England    8. History / General   


    $10.36

    History of the Britons
    by Nennius
    Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 June, 1986)
    list price: $3.95 -- our price: $3.95
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    Reviews (5)

    1-0 out of 5 stars cheap, disgraceful, and a terrible wasted opportunity
    When J.Giles translated a number of ancient British and English historical texts in 1844, he was, I suppose, breaking new ground - although not so new as might be thought, since many of his texts were widely and long since known.But that any publisher should see fit to reprint his dated and by now thoroughly inadequate translation, is hard to believe; and that it should be the mighty Penguin, the largest British publisher of classic texts in paperback, is beyond condemnation.It is not as though newer translations were not available.These texts are absolutely fundamental to the understanding of the history of Britain, and to place this in the hands of the ordinary paperback reader, with Penguin's supposed authority behind it, in place of a new version with the insights of 160 years of scholarship behind it, is to do them a grave disservice.I really cannot understand why Penguin has been struck with such a sudden fit of cheapskatehood; or should we think of offloading any shares we have in the company?

    2-0 out of 5 stars A Reprint of Part of a Very Old Collection of Translations
    This small paper reprint comes from a very old collection of translations that contained Gildas, Geoffrey, and Nennius with I believe a section of the Anglo Saxon Chronical.The Translation is rather poor and is from a manuscript inferior to that used for Nennius, History of the British, 1980. This manuscript unlike that used for Myres' edition does not contain the Annales Cambriae.The reason this version is the only one in circulation might be the lack of copywrite protection.Be warned this translation by Giles is not annotated in any way and is in an order not congruent with that cited in most Arthurian secondary literature--following up footnotes will be difficult.If you can get the 1980 translation from a university library or a very good public library, you can annotate this text and correct the the most glaring translation errors.

    4-0 out of 5 stars A fascinating historical artifact
    There is considerable controversy about this work. Drawing on earlier sources (some of which are no longer available), it appears to have been compiled around the end of the Eighth Century by a Welsh monk named Nennius. The book contains (not in this order) a history of Britain, complete with genealogies back to Adam, a list of extant British cities, and a short history of Saint Patrick. Most significantly, the book contains numerous references to Vortigern, Ambrosius and Arthur.

    This short book is (compared to modern books) poorly organized, and of dubious reliability. However, as a historical artifact it is quite fascinating. If you have ever read references to Nennius' work in another book, then it would be worth your wile to get ahold of the book, and read see the references in context. I enjoyed it, and think that you will too. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0899790194
    Sales Rank: 610711


    $3.95

    Kings & Queens of England and Scotland
    by Plantagenet Somerset Fry, Plantagenet Somerset Fry
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 May, 1999)
    list price: $13.00 -- our price: $10.40
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    Reviews (7)

    5-0 out of 5 stars PERFECT REFERENCE BOOK
    As an avid reader of historical fiction, histories, and such I have grown to rely on this book as a companion.Most helpful are the flowcharts that accompany each new dynasty - too often I find myself forgetting who was married to whom...no more!
    However, for those of you interested in more than just a quick thumbprint of the Kings & Queens, this book will not fit the bill.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great for everyone!
    This is a neat, fun, informative book for everyone, young and old alike. Facts, information, interesting anecdotes, and superb pictures and graphics. The handy size makes it perfect for kids working on reports for school as well.A super book for a number of reasons, and a great one to have on your shelf, especially if you have kids in school or simply want to know more about British Royalty.

    5-0 out of 5 stars An enjoyable and well illustrated book!
    I bought this book a couple of years ago. I read it and found it quite easy and enjoyable to read. Now I use it mainly for quick reference and usually find myself spending more time just browsing through its pages and enjoying it over and over. It has a lot of interesting historical facts! I wish there were similar books on other europpean royal houses! ... Read more

    Isbn: 0789442450
    Sales Rank: 41685
    Subjects:  1. Biography    2. Europe - Great Britain - General    3. Europe - Great Britain - Scotland    4. Great Britain    5. History    6. History - General History    7. History: World    8. Kings and rulers    9. Monarchy    10. Politics and government    11. Royalty    12. Scotland   


    $10.40

    The Oxford Illustrated History of Britain (Oxford Illustrated Histories)
    by Kenneth O. Morgan
    Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 November, 2000)
    list price: $26.50 -- our price: $17.49
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    Reviews (5)

    2-0 out of 5 stars Sketchy
    The book shown above is the hardcover edition. It's also published, without illustrations, in five paperback volumes. I read only THE TUDORS AND STUARTS, which had no illustrations other than two or three maps and graphs. The first half of the book, about the Tudors, was written by one man, and the second half, about the Stuarts, by another. The volume was short, only 142 pages.

    This is my favorite period of British history and the one with which I am most familiar, but still, I found the text confusing. I think there were several misplaced lines of type in the second half. Maybe a writer can't do much in 70 pages to elucidate a period, and probably the illustrations would have distracted from the sketchy text. The writing was not lively.

    The very last section is called "Intellectual and Religious Life," but it was mostly about religious life. Literature is almost totally ignored throughout the volume. Pepys is never mentioned.

    There is no index. Perhaps the complete, one-volume version has an index, and the publisher didn't want to go to the trouble of compiling indexes for the individual volumes. Still, a history book without an index is unthinkable.

    On the whole, the book was disappointing.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Mismash of uneven writing
    I'm a half-educated American, with the vaguest notions of British history. I bought this book hoping to be able to understand the story of the British Isles, in a more or less clear outline. That didn't happen: after 200 pages, I tossed the book, wondering just who it was written for. Here's why I tossed it:

    (1) It doesn't have an author. Instead, it has a bunch of authors, each apparently assigned a certain portion of British history to cover. The problem is that none of the authors seem to have consulted each other, nor did the editor seem to edit. On every other page, you see a fact or definition repeated (by a previous author), or a topic referenced (but uncovered by a previous author). History is a messy thing, but it has to be organized to be learned, and any hope of presenting material in terms of themes or movements is lost, because styles and approaches switch radically from author to author, from clear and sparse, to confusing and overly-detailed.

    (2) It should have an author. This sounds like point (1), but hear me out: the editor, Mr. Morgan, claims that writing grand history, spanning the length of the British past, just can't be written anymore. It is better, rather, to have specialists write about their specialities. Sounds good in theory, but is just abominable when placed next to comprehensive histories written by single authors. Toynbee and Trevleyan wrote such history earlier. And J. Roberts writes such history now, particularly his History of Europe, and History of the World, two models of lucid historical writing that make this disjointed compilation look like an ill-considered mishmash.

    (3) It should have an audience. Or at least a different audience: the average intelligent reader wants a clean, interesting exposition of the important events and currents of the past. While some chapters achieve that, the most seem to be written not to the Average Reader, but to the Rival Colleague. And so we see a few facts casually presented, and then a sudden digression into some piece of scholarly minutae that leaves the reader (me, that is) pexplexed.

    (4) It should teach historical knowledge, not assume it. This is one of those histories that assumes from the onset that you know all the relevant history. That might be OK for a narrow scholarly article, but it's an awful presumption for a comprehensive history. I read dozens of pages discussing the 'Domesday Book,' its importance, and its effects. The authors never thought to enlighten the ignorant, and explain what this Domesday Book was (an very old tax survey). Things like this litter every page.

    From previous reading, I've learned that good history can be written. From reading this, I've learned that very bad history can be written, too.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Mismash of uneven writing
    I'm a half-educated American, with the vaguest notions of British history.I bought this book hoping to be able to understand the story of the British Isles, in a more or less clear outline.That didn't happen: after 200 pages, I tossed the book, wondering just who it was written for.Here's why I tossed it:

    (1) It doesn't have an author.Instead, it has a bunch of authors, each apparently assigned a certain portion of British history to cover.The problem is that none of the authors seem to have consulted each other, nor did the editor seem to edit.On every other page, you see a fact or definition repeated (by a previous author), or a topic referenced (but uncovered by a previous author).History is a messy thing, but it has to be organized to be learned, and any hope of presenting material in terms of themes or movements is lost, because styles and approaches switch radically from author to author, from clear and sparse, to confusing and overly-detailed.

    (2) It should have an author.This sounds like point (1), but hear me out: the editor, Mr. Morgan, claims that writing grand history, spanning the length of the British past, just can't be written anymore.It is better, rather, to have specialists write about their specialities.Sounds good in theory, but is just abominable when placed next to comprehensive histories written by single authors.Toynbee and Trevleyan wrote such history earlier.And J. Roberts writes such history now, particularly his History of Europe, and History of the World, two models of lucid historical writing that make this disjointed compilation look like an ill-considered mishmash.

    (3) It should have an audience.Or at least a different audience: the average intelligent reader wants a clean, interesting exposition of the important events and currents of the past.While some chapters achieve that, the most seem to be written not to the Average Reader, but to the Rival Colleague.And so we see a few facts casually presented, and then a sudden digression into some piece of scholarly minutae that leaves the reader (me, that is) pexplexed.

    (4) It should teach historical knowledge, not assume it.This is one of those histories that assumes from the onset that you know all the relevant history.That might be OK for a narrow scholarly article, but it's an awful presumption for a comprehensive history.I read dozens of pages discussing the 'Domesday Book,' its importance, and its effects.The authors never thought to enlighten the ignorant, and explain what this Domesday Book was (an very old tax survey).Things like this litter every page.

    From previous reading, I've learned that good history can be written.From reading this, I've learned that very bad history can be written, too. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0192893262
    Sales Rank: 42663
    Subjects:  1. Europe - Great Britain - General    2. Great Britain    3. Great Britain - History    4. History    5. History - General History    6. History: World    7. Reference    8. BCE to c 500 CE    9. British & Irish history    10. Modern period, c 1500 onwards    11. United Kingdom, Great Britain    12. c 1000 CE to c 1500    13. c 500 CE to c 1000 CE   


    $17.49

    The Lives of the Kings & Queens of England
    by Antonia Fraser
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 February, 2000)
    list price: $29.95 -- our price: $19.77
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    Reviews (16)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Nice overview
    This is book gives a brief but useful history of every English monarch over the past millenium.I knew very little about the monarchy before reading the book, and this was a perfect introduction.This book would also probably be helpful for those who want a refresher in their history or for those who are just trying to keep all of the Henrys, Georges, and Edwards straight.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent resource
    Antonia Fraser does a great job here, outlining the lives and adventures of the Kings and Queens of England, from the time of the Norman conquest.And of course its not just a history of England that we are reading here, from time to time it was also a history of the known world - there were times when if England didn't own another country, they were coveting it, or were in some conflict with it.And what fascinating people these royal people were.They were of their times, they were shaped by the times, they were defeated by their times, and in being so helped shape the world that we see today.They were competent, insane, brilliant, loyal, lecherous and obsessive.This is a history of mankind - only far more visible!

    Antonia Fraser is one of the finest historical writers today.In this book she does not have the space or time to delve into the nitty gritty of the reigns of each monarch, but she does give a fascinating and insightful snap shot of their times.This is a valuable reference book for any half serious library, as it deals not only with the people, but the times tthat they lived in.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Royal Portraits
    Antonia Fraser's 'The Lives of the Kings and Queens of England' has long been one of my favourite books (since my childhood, really), because it has both breadth and brevity simultaneously, a rare feat. Lady Fraser's style is evident here, a non-imposing and non-technical style, that is nonetheless satisfying to all but the most rigourous of academic historians.

    Fraser's account begins with the Norman invasion; like many books on royal history, scant attention is paid to pre-Norman figures. Fraser groups the monarchs into categories:

    Normans
    Angevins
    Plantagenets
    House of Lancaster
    House of York
    Tudors
    Stuarts
    House of Hanover
    House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha
    House of Windsor

    Putting together the genealogical tables is a fun exercise--beware here, however, that lesser historical figures are left off the charts (thus, Queen Anne's bevy of children are not represented on the genealogy as none lived to assume the crown or perpetuate the line). Each monarch is given an article about 10-15 pages in length (a good bedtime reading length, I've found). Pictures and paintings help place visually the stories, together with the interspersed essays on coats-of-arms and other topics.

    Fraser likes to find the humourous aspects whenever possible. Writing on William IV's distaste for the young Victoria's mother:' 'In 1836 the Duchess of Kent took over a large suite of rooms in Kensington Palace without the King's permission. William was furious. If he died now, Victoria would not be old enough to rule without her mother as Regent. At a public dinner, attended by more than a hundred guests, William said that he hoped his life would be spared long enough to prevent such a calamity.'

    His wish was granted.

    An ideal gift for anyone, child to adult, who has an interest in the history of the British royals, and a good ready-reference for students, this book is first-rate. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0520224604
    Sales Rank: 52920
    Subjects:  1. Biography / Autobiography    2. Europe - Great Britain - General    3. Historical - British    4. History    5. History: World    6. Royalty   


    $19.77

    The Oxford Illustrated History of the British Monarchy (Oxford Illustrated Histories)
    by John Cannon, Ralph Griffiths
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Paperback (01 November, 2000)
    list price: $27.50
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    Reviews (2)

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Royal Collection
    The Oxford Illustrated History of the British Monarchy is a uniquely complete book. This is a book very worthy of Oxford, consisting primarily of chapters on royal and political history generally, interspersed throughout with boxed essays on each monarch, special topics, maps, photographs and paintings.

    This book begins with the murky beginnings of royalty in Britain, arising out of the chaos of the post-Roman world. Here we encounter names such as Aethelberht, Raewald, and Hywel Dda -- this book doesn't just concentrate as so many do on the English monarchies, but also on Welsh and Scottish clans, lines, and kingdoms. Here we find that King Eric Bloodaxe, the Viking King of York was followed not too many years later by Edgar the Peacable, king of Mercia and the Danelaw.

    With the inclusion of this extensive pre-Norman section, the book is a must for any British history library. Apart from that, the history is fairly basic -- well written, interesting, but no grand and new insights, more of an encyclopedia writ as an essay rather than articles on particular subjects (for which I am grateful--nothing so disjointed and unsatisfying in many ways as reading an encyclopedia). This however can make looking up topics a bit more difficult, but I've found as I've sought out one piece of information (using the very good index) I find much more (which is always to be desired).

    The final sections include chapters on Royal Residences and Tombs, Genealogies, and Lists of Monarchs, including Scottish as well as English monarchs.

    This book is filled with little bits of interest--for instance, an example of 17th century propaganda: 'In the absence of newspapers, radio, and television, other means of representing events and influencing opinion assumed greater importance. A pack of cards took as its unconvivial theme Monmouth's rebellion in 1685. The six of clubs shows Monmouth's entry into Lyme Regis; the seven of spades shows the duke's fate; and the five of diamonds that of his followers.' This caption accompanies pictures of playing cards with scenes of hanged or beheaded men, etc. An interesting means of information dissemination.

    A very worthy book, perhaps the only royal book a non-historian would ever need; a definite need for any historian or royal watcher.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Thouroughly enjoyable. Scholarly, but highly readable.
    This book is a must for those readers interested in the history of the British Monarchy. The authors and editors have masterly created both an historical perspective of the institution as well as a personal viewpointwhich is both critical and sentimental. Some may be turned off by thelength of this book, but once you begin reading, you'll wonder where thetime goes. And the wonderful photographs and illustrations bring theirwords to life. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0192893289
    Sales Rank: 415757
    Subjects:  1. Europe - Great Britain - General    2. Great Britain    3. History    4. History - General History    5. History: World    6. Monarchy    7. Politics and government    8. Biography: royalty    9. British & Irish history    10. Rank & titles    11. United Kingdom, Great Britain   


    The Oxford Illustrated History of Medieval England (Oxford Illustrated Histories)
    by Nigel Saul
    Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars
    Hardcover (01 May, 1997)
    list price: $75.00 -- our price: $75.00
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    Reviews (1)

    3-0 out of 5 stars The Oxford Illustrated History of Medieval England.
    This is a well constructed book which contains much valuable and interesting information together with an excellent selection of illustrations.

    Unfortunately the author's use of rather poor English grammar combined with convoluted and involved sentences tends to detract from reading enjoyment Nobody wishes to have to re-read sentences in order to obtain the sense in them. ... Read more

    Isbn: 0198205023
    Sales Rank: 598727
    Subjects:  1. 0-1066    2. 1066-1485    3. Civilization    4. England    5. Europe - Great Britain - General    6. European    7. Great Britain    8. Great Britain - History    9. History    10. History - General History    11. Medieval    12. Medieval period, 1066-1485    13. Reference    14. British & Irish history: c 1000 to c 1500    15. British & Irish history: c 500 to c 1000    16. c 1000 CE to c 1500    17. c 500 CE to c 1000 CE   


    $75.00

    The Cambridge Illustrated History of the Middle Ages 3 volume set
    by Robert Fossier
    Hardcover (29 May, 1997)
    list price: $200.00 -- our price: $200.00
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    Isbn: 0521590787
    Sales Rank: 864366
    Subjects:  1. Civilization, Medieval    2. Europe - General    3. History - General History    4. History: World    5. Medieval    6. Medieval World History (Circa 450 - Circa 1450)    7. BCE to c 500 CE    8. Europe    9. European history: c 500 to c 1500    10. History / Europe / General    11. Modern period, c 1500 onwards    12. c 1000 CE to c 1500    13. c 500 CE to c 1000 CE   


    $200.00

    The Cambridge Illustrated History of the Middle Ages: Volume 1, 350-950 (Cambridge Illustrated History of the Middle Ages)
    by Robert Fossier, Janet Sondheimer
    Hardcover (23 February, 1989)
    list price: $80.00 -- our price: $64.66
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    Isbn: 0521266440
    Sales Rank: 824161
    Subjects:  1. Civilization, Medieval    2. Europe - General    3. History    4. History - General History    5. History: World    6. Medieval    7. Medieval World History (Circa 450 - Circa 1450)    8. Europe    9. European history: c 500 to c 1500    10. History / Europe / General   


    $64.66

    The Cambridge Illustrated History of the Middle Ages: Volume 2, 950-1250 (Cambridge Illustrated History of the Middle Ages)
    by Robert Fossier, Stuart Airlie, Robyn Marsack
    Hardcover (29 May, 1997)
    list price: $80.00 -- our price: $65.22
    (price subject to change: see help)
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France

    Isbn: 0521266459
    Sales Rank: 939367
    Subjects:  1. Civilization, Medieval    2. Europe - General    3. History    4. History - General History    5. History: World    6. Medieval    7. Medieval World History (Circa 450 - Circa 1450)    8. Europe    9. European history: c 500 to c 1500    10. History / Europe / General    11. c 1000 CE to c 1500    12. c 500 CE to c 1000 CE   


    $65.22

    The Cambridge Illustrated History of the Middle Ages: Volume 3, 1250-1520 (Cambridge Illustrated History of the Middle Ages)
    by Robert Fossier, Sarah Hanbury-Tenison
    Hardcover (04 December, 1986)
    list price: $80.00 -- our price: $80.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France

    Isbn: 0521266467
    Sales Rank: 746065
    Subjects:  1. Civilization, Medieval    2. Europe - General    3. History    4. History - General History    5. Medieval    6. Medieval World History (Circa 450 - Circa 1450)    7. Europe    8. European history: c 500 to c 1500    9. History / Europe / General   


    $80.00

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